BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir

A year has passed since I set up my first BiOrbAir, an automated, specialised terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from Reef One.  I have loved and appreciated this special terrarium every day, and will continue to do so.

Now, thanks to a wonderful and very generous, special gift, from my family and friends, who all enjoy seeing my first BiOrbAir terrarium, and have appreciated watching the plants inside develop and grow.  I am lucky enough to have another, second BiOrbAir terrarium to plant up and enjoy.  I will share my experiences of this, my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium, which I planted up with miniature orchids and mosses in August 2015, with you in this review.

Apart from your plants, everything else you need to plant up your terrarium is included when you buy your BiOrbAir – it all arrives together in one wonderful, ginormous box!  Terrarium plants are also available on the BiOrbAir website, and you can even purchase a pre-planted BiOrbAir from their website, if it’s being delivered to the UK – pre-planted terrariums can’t be shipped overseas.

The BiOrbAir's capillary matting, shown here fitted to the support tray, which will in a moment be fitted inside the BiOrbAir terrarium, above the base water reservoir.
The BiOrbAir’s capillary matting, shown here fitted to the support tray, which will, in a moment’s time be fitted inside the BiOrbAir terrarium, above the base water reservoir.
Here you can see the BiOrbAir's green capillary matting in position, over the support tray, which in turn fits over the base reservoir. The rain water from the base reservoir is absorbed and taken up through the capillary matting, thereby moistening the coir compost above, a process known as capillary watering. The blue wrap is a protective covering, which is left in place until the BiOrbAir is planted and ready to be admired.
Here you can see the BiOrbAir’s green capillary matting in position, over the support tray, which in turn fits over the base reservoir. The rain water from the base reservoir is absorbed and taken up through the capillary matting, thereby moistening the coir compost above, a process known as capillary watering. The blue wrap is a protective covering, which should be left in place until the BiOrbAir is planted and ready to be admired.

Irrigation

Naturally, I will regularly top up the base reservoir of my BiOrbAir with rain water as required.  The rain water in the base reservoir will be absorbed by the capillary matting, which is fitted to the support tray.  The support tray sits above the base reservoir, the strips of capillary matting hang down into the rain water in the base reservoir below.  The capillary matting absorbs the rain water, which in turn will moisten the compost above.  The absorption of water through the capillary matting will keep the coir compost moist, and as a result, any plants growing in the coir compost will be watered automatically.

Terrarium misting unit

I will regularly top up the ultrasonic mister unit with Humidimist, a pure bottled water, low in electrolytes.  Humidimist is available from Reef One, and is included as part of the package when you purchase a BiOrbAir.  The Humidimist is the only type of water recommended for use in the ultrasonic misting unit of the BiOrbAir, and it is the only product I will use.

Misting and feeding miniature orchids

I will regularly mist my miniature orchids.  I don’t have set days to mist the orchids, but I will endeavour to mist the plants several times a week.

To feed my miniature orchids, I will use Orchid Focus Grow and Orchid Focus Bloom, I purchased both of these fertilisers from the shop at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.  I feed my orchids only sparingly, following the instructions on the pack.  Epiphytic miniature orchids wouldn’t receive an abundance of nutrients in their natural environment, here the only nutrients they receive arrive on the moisture in the air, rainfall, and any debris that has accumulated over time where they are growing.  Over feeding can be detrimental to your plants, causing further problems.

I decided to plant this new terrarium with miniature orchids, mounted onto cork bark, and surrounded by a bed of pillow moss.  I will review my new BiOrbAir terrarium and update this page each month with information of how the miniature orchids are growing inside my BiOrbAir.  I will detail any maintenance or indoor gardening work I undertake to either my BiOrbAir terrarium, and any of the plants inside.

I hope this review will help you if you’re looking to start up a terrarium of your own, or would like to learn more about growing miniature orchids.  Through this trial and review I hope to identify miniature orchids that will thrive inside the BiOrbAir .

Terrarium compost – peat free coir compost

This BiOrbAir peat-free coir compost block comes as part of the package when you purchase a BiOrbAir terrarium, you can also purchase additional coir compost blocks on the BiOrbAir website.
This BiOrbAir peat-free coir compost block comes as part of the package when you purchase a BiOrbAir terrarium, you can also purchase additional coir compost blocks on the BiOrbAir website.
Here’s the BiOrbAir peat-free coir compost being soaked in water prior to planting.
Here’s the BiOrbAir peat-free coir compost being soaked in water prior to planting.
The BiOrbAir peat-free coir compost after soaking in a bucket of water.
The BiOrbAir peat-free coir compost after soaking in a bucket of water.

I used the peat-free, coir compost that was included with my BiOrbAir as the growing media for this terrarium.  I followed the straight-forward instructions to pre-soak the compost before adding it to my terrarium.  This was the only compost I used when planting this terrarium, I didn’t add any other growing media or fertiliser, I used only the coir compost provided with the BiOrbAir.

Any fertilisers I use, and any care and maintenance of either the plants or terrarium I undertake, I will detail here in my review – I hope this will help you if you’re looking to start a terrarium, or if you’re interested in growing miniature orchids.  Through reading this trial of growing miniature orchids inside a BiOrbAir you have the opportunity to learn from my mistakes, and fingers crossed, to learn from my successes too!

My punnet of Pillow moss ready to be planted inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
My punnet of Pillow moss ready to be planted inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.

Moss for terrariums

I have been looking for ethical moss growers in the UK for quite a while.  I sent out a number of emails and enquiries to try to find out more about UK moss growers, sadly so far without success.  Then I found Triangle Nursery – although Triangle Nursery don’t grow their moss in the UK – their moss is grown in Holland, none of their pillow moss is taken from the wild, it’s all grown on their nurseries.  Following the company’s guarantee that the moss wasn’t removed from its natural environment, I went ahead and purchased a punnet of pillow moss online from Triangle Nursery.  My new pillow moss is a beautiful verdant green, the moss really adds to the planting inside this BiOrbAir, enhancing the beauty of this terrarium.

Epiphytic, miniature orchids

All of the orchids that I have chosen for this trial are epiphytic – they grow naturally on other plants, often trees, which provide support, and a place for the orchid to grow.  Epiphytic plants are not the same as parasitic plants like mistletoe, they don’t take any sustenance from their host plant – epiphytic orchids don’t usually cause any harm to the host plant they are growing on.  Epiphytic plants simply use another plant as a support, taking all their water and nutrients from the air, the rain, and any accumulated debris that has collected in the branches of their host tree.

Mounting orchids onto cork bark

All of the epiphytic miniature orchids featured in this trial have been mounted on to cork bark, the orchids have been secured in place onto the cork using fishing line.  Fishing line is a clear material, that won’t detract from the beauty of the orchids.  I did have a concern that the fishing line might slice into the roots of the orchids, so I have tried counteract this risk by positioning moss in front of the fishing line to protect the orchid roots.

I carried out all kinds of sterilising techniques to the cork before introducing it to my BiOrbAir – this cork has been boiled, baked in the oven, and microwaved – hopefully the cork was free from insects beforehand – now it certainly is!

Cork is such an amazing and interesting, fascinating natural material, obtained from the bark of Quercus suber, (commonly known as the Cork Oak).  Cork has many uses.  The cork industry is regarded as sustainable, as the Quercus suber trees are not required to be cut down to harvest the bark, and harvesting the bark does not harm the tree – the Quercus suber trees continue to grow after their bark is harvested, and their bark also re-grows.  The trees go on provide future harvests at regular intervals every 9 years or so.  I purchased my cork bark online from the Jelinek Cork Group.

My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 26th August 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 26th August 2015.

Terrarium planting list

I decided to plant a number of different varieties of miniature epiphytic orchids, which originate from different countries and climates in my BiOrbAir Trial to make this trial more interesting.

I am keen to observe each miniature orchid variety, and see how the plants grow in the constant conditions provided by the BiOrbAir – many orchids require dryer periods, needing periods of rest and distinct changes between the seasons to grow well.  Often changes in the growing conditions are required to encourage and induce flowering in orchids, as is true of many plants.  Some orchids just won’t grow under artificial light, they need natural light to succeed, whereas other orchids thrive when grown in a terrarium, growing far better than they would outside of this contained, controlled environment.  Let’s hope that some of the miniature orchids I have chosen to grow for this trial will succeed when grown inside my BiOrbAir terrarium!

My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on 26th August.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on 26th August.

I decided to include the following orchids in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir:

  • Aerangis fastuosa
  • Aerangis punctata
  • Angraecum equitans
  • Diplocaulobium abbreviatum
  • Domingoa purpurea
  • Masdevallia decumana

All of the orchids listed above were purchased from Orchids-shop.eu

You can see photographs and read a little more information about each of the miniature orchids I am trialling in this BiOrbAir, together with information about other miniature orchids I am growing inside my first BiOrbAir, in my planting list of miniature orchids for terrariums.

My miniature orchids being misted by the BiOrbAir’s ultra sonic misting unit. 26th August 2015.
My miniature orchids being misted by the BiOrbAir’s ultra sonic misting unit. 26th August 2015.

19th September 2015

I am so enjoying having this second BiOrAir terrarium, I am thrilled to be trialling miniature orchids, to find out which varieties of miniature orchids will grow best in the constant conditions provided by the specialised, automated, BiOrbAir terrarium.  I feel so grateful to have been given such a generous gift of the terrarium, moss, cork and orchids – everything inside the terrarium and the terrarium itself, is a special present from my family and friends.  Therefore I do also have quite a few feelings of anxiety and responsibility around the success of the orchids, and the success of the terrarium as a whole.  This terrarium and the orchids mean just so much to me, I hope so much that they will all grow well inside the BiOrbAir.

When the orchids for this terrarium arrived in the post on the 25th August 2015, the four potted orchids – Aerangis fastuosa, Aerangis punctata, Angraecum equitans, and Masdevallia decumana – had got entangled in their own packaging.  Each of the potted orchids had packing material, held in place with sticky tape, around the top of each of the pots, just under the plant’s leaves.  Unfortunately most of the surface area of the sticky tape had not been throughly stuck down before posting, and as a consequence four of the orchids, all of them in pots, had all become stuck to each other.  The sticky tape from one pot had attached itself to the leaves of another orchid, and so on, with the weight of each attached pot, pulling at the leaves and plant they had become stuck to, for their entire journey to me.

This mistake with the sticky tape becoming attached to the orchids, resulted in my Angraecum equitans being damaged in transit and consequently uprooted from its pot.  This error could have been entirely avoided had the orchids after being wrapped with a protective covering, then been wrapped individually with newspaper to cover the entire plant, ensuring that the whole plant was packaged with protective wrap to protect from any bumps on the journey, but also ensuring that the orchids would not damage each other in transit or stick together.

I mounted this Angraecum equitans orchid, along with the other orchids in this terrarium, onto cork bark, on the 26th August 2015.  I placed the pieces of cork complete with the mounted orchids inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir straight after mounting.

My Angraecum equitans on 26th August 2015. Sadly this miniature orchid was damaged in the post, after the four potted orchids became entangled in their own packaging and the attached sticky tape from one pot, became attached to the leaves of another orchid in another pot. This uprooted the Angraecum equitans from its pot and damaged the roots.
My Angraecum equitans on 26th August 2015. Sadly this miniature orchid was damaged in the post, after the four potted orchids became entangled in their own packaging and the attached sticky tape from one pot, became attached to the leaves of another orchid in another pot. This uprooted the Angraecum equitans from its pot and damaged the orchid’s roots.
My Angraecum equitans on 26th August 2015. Sadly this miniature orchid was damaged in the post, after the four potted orchids became entangled in their own packaging and the attached sticky tape from one pot, became attached to the leaves of another orchid in another pot. This uprooted the Angraecum equitans from its pot and damaged the orchid's roots. In this photograph you can see a close up of the remainder of the damaged root that was attached to the Angraecum equitans when it arrived with me after purchase.
My Angraecum equitans on 26th August 2015. Sadly this miniature orchid was damaged in the post, after the four potted orchids became entangled in their own packaging and the attached sticky tape from one pot, became attached to the leaves of another orchid in another pot. This uprooted the Angraecum equitans from its pot and damaged the orchid’s roots. In this photograph you can see a close up of the remainder of the damaged root that was attached to the Angraecum equitans when it arrived with me after purchase.
My Angraecum equitans on 26th August 2015. Sadly this miniature orchid was damaged in the post, after the four potted orchids became entangled in their own packaging and the attached sticky tape from one pot, became attached to the leaves of another orchid in another pot. This uprooted the Angraecum equitans from its pot and damaged the orchid's roots. In this photograph you can see the remainder of the damaged root that was attached to the Angraecum equitans.
My Angraecum equitans on 26th August 2015. Sadly this miniature orchid was damaged in the post, after the four potted orchids became entangled in their own packaging and the attached sticky tape from one pot, became attached to the leaves of another orchid in another pot. This uprooted the Angraecum equitans from its pot and damaged the orchid’s roots. In this photograph you can see the remainder of the damaged root that was attached to the Angraecum equitans.
My Angraecum equitans pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 15th September 2015.
Here’s my Angraecum equitans pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 15th September 2015.

Masdevallia decumana problems

On the 2nd September 2015 I noticed that the leaves of my Masdevallia decumana looked a little off colour, and I could see some spotting and marking of the leaves.  This quickly progressed, and by the morning the leaves looked to be in a much worse condition.

My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 3rd September 2015. As you can see there is some yellowing and marking on the leaves of my Masdevallia decumana.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 3rd September 2015. As you can see there is some yellowing and marking on the leaves of my Masdevallia decumana.
A close up of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 3rd September 2015. Again you can see the marked, yellowing leaves of my Masdevallia decumana.
A close up of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 3rd September 2015. Again you can see the marked, yellowing leaves of my Masdevallia decumana.
My Masdevallia decumana, looking in a poor state inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 3rd September 2015.
My Masdevallia decumana, looking in a poor state inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 3rd September 2015.
My Aerangis puctata pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium. As you can see there is also some damage to the leaf of this orchid.
My Aerangis puctata pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium. As you can see there is also some damage to the leaf of this orchid.

I am a member of the Royal Horticultural Society, a UK gardening charity who offer a free plant advisory service to all their members.  I decided that this would be the perfect time to receive some advice about my new orchids, so I sterilised my tools and removed all of the affected leaves from my Masdevallia decumana, sterilising again in between each cut and leaf removal.  I parcelled the Masdevallia decumana leaves, together with a leaf that I had removed from my Aerangis fastuosa – the Aerangis fastuosa had different, but still concerning markings on its leaf, which had been present since its arrival in the post.  I posted these samples to The Advisory Service at RHS Garden Wisley on 4th September 2015 and awaited a reply.

In the meantime I ensured that all of the infected plant material was removed from my orchids.  I allowed the orchids to dry out more than usual, leaving the lid of my BiOrbAir open for a little while the same evening to achieve this.  I then closed the BiOrbAir lid and left the terrarium to its automatic mistings, knowing that the humidity would be 75% RH inside the BiOrbAir, thanks to the automatic settings in this terrarium.  If I could have opted to have reduced the humidity in this instance I would have done so, but this isn’t possible with the pre-set automatic settings of the BiOrbAir.

My Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd September 2015. This miniature orchid is suffering from a virus. Since this photograph was taken I have removed the leaves which are showing signs of infection from the virus, ensuring that I sterilised my tools between each cut and every leaf removal.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd September 2015. This miniature orchid is suffering from a virus. Since this photograph was taken I have removed the leaves which are showing signs of infection from the virus, ensuring that I sterilised my tools between each cut and every leaf removal.
An infected leaf from the Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd September 2015. The leaf shows signs of black depressions and markings, which look to be caused by a virus.
An infected leaf from the Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd September 2015. The leaf shows signs of black depressions and markings, which look to be caused by a virus.
A close up of an infected leaf from the Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd September 2015. The leaf shows signs of black depressions and markings, which look to be caused by a virus.
A close up of an infected leaf from the Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd September 2015. The leaf shows signs of black depressions and markings, which look to be caused by a virus.
Here's my Masdevallia decumana on 3rd September 2015, showing very clear signs of infection. Here you can see a close up of the fungal leaf spot, which is most likely to be Colletotrichum leaf spot.
Here’s my Masdevallia decumana on 3rd September 2015, showing very clear signs of infection. Here you can see a close up of the fungal leaf spot, which is most likely to be Colletotrichum leaf spot.
One of the infected leaves I have removed from my Masdevallia decumana to send into the Advisory Service at RHS Garden Wisley. The Royal Horticultural Society offer a free advisory service, which includes identifying pests and diseases, to all their members.
One of the infected leaves I have removed from my Masdevallia decumana to send into the Advisory Service at RHS Garden Wisley. The Royal Horticultural Society offer a free advisory service, which includes identifying pests and diseases, to all their members.
Another of the infected leaves I have removed from my Masdevallia decumana to send into the Advisory Service at RHS Garden Wisley. The Royal Horticultural Society offer an advisory service, which includes identifying pests and diseases, to all their members, this is one of the many benefits offered to RHS members. My Masdevallia decumana was deemed to be suffering from a fungal leaf spot, the spotting looking typically like Colletotrichum leaf spot, which is commonly seen in orchids.
Another of the infected leaves I have removed from my Masdevallia decumana to send into the Advisory Service at RHS Garden Wisley. The Royal Horticultural Society offer an advisory service, which includes identifying pests and diseases, to all their members, this is one of the many benefits offered to RHS members. My Masdevallia decumana was deemed to be suffering from a fungal leaf spot, the spotting looking typically like Colletotrichum leaf spot, which is commonly seen in orchids.

On the 11th September 2015, the RHS replied to my letter, having analysed the orchid leaves and samples I sent in.  Here’s a summary of their reply and analysis:

The Aerangis fastuosa leaf sample enclosed had black marks present. There are depression and streaks, which leads me to suspect that this is likely to be due to a virus. There are several viruses that can affect orchid plants, they have similar symptoms, but we do not have the facilities to be able to identify them. The best thing to do would be to remove the affected plant tissue and hope that it has not spread throughout the plant. With no fungicides that can be used, the only control would be to prevent the virus from being moved about which could be via insects or sap on your hand and tools. I am guessing that there is unlikely to be any insects present, so cleaning tools is the best action.

With regards to the Masdevallia decumana leaves enclosed, these were found to have a fungal leaf spot present. The spotting looked typical for Colletotrichum leaf spot which is one of the more common fungal problems that affects orchids. There are no fungicides specifically labelled for use on orchids, but many can be used on ornamental plants and may have some incidental control of this disease. Fungicides will not give a 100% control and therefore I’d recommend to remove the affected plant tissue. With fungal leaf spot my normal advice would be to improve the general growing conditions around the plant, eg watering and feeding. Also making sure they have good spacing and airflow around will help reduce leaf diseases in general. I can see that the last few points might be a bit difficult in a terrarium.

I was very happy with the advice I received from the Royal Horticultural Society, it confirmed my own thoughts and suspicions.  Since the removal of the infected leaves, my Masdevallia decumana looks a lot better, it has two, new healthy looking leaves growing.

After what has happened I will be keeping a close eye on this orchid and the other orchids growing inside this terrarium.

My Masdevallia decumana pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 15th September 2015. This miniature orchid is now looking much healthier since I removed its infected leaves. This plant has been suffering from a fungal leaf spot infection. I am keeping a close eye on its progress.
My Masdevallia decumana pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 15th September 2015. This miniature orchid is now looking much healthier since I removed its infected leaves. This plant has been suffering from a fungal leaf spot infection. I am keeping a close eye on its progress.
My Domingoa purpurea (top) and Masdevallia decumana (below) pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 15th September 2015.
My Domingoa purpurea (top) and Masdevallia decumana (below) pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 15th September 2015.
My Aerangis fastuosa pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 20th September 2015. This miniature orchid was found to be suffering from a virus. I will be keeping a close eye on all my orchids, but especially this one and will update this review with their progress.
My Aerangis fastuosa pictured in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 20th September 2015. This miniature orchid was found to be suffering from a virus. I will be keeping a close eye on all my orchids, but especially this one and will update this review with their progress.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 20th September 2015.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 20th September 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, pictured on the 15th September 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium, pictured on the 15th September 2015.

7th October 2015

My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial on 1st October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial on 1st October 2015.

Miniature orchids recovering?

I have been keeping a close eye on my orchids in my Miniature Orchid Trial.  At the moment, things are looking much better inside this terrarium, and so far I’ve not seen any new signs of disease on my miniature orchids.  I still have some real concerns for my orchid plants, but I am glad to see that for the moment, things have stabilised inside this terrarium, with no new signs of disease appearing as yet.  Of course this could change quickly, so I am keeping a close eye on all of the miniature orchids inside this terrarium.

My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum inside my BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum inside my BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Angraecum equitans inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Angraecum equitans inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Angraecum equitans inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Angraecum equitans inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015.
A close up of my Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. As you can see this miniature orchid isn't showing any new signs of disease.
A close up of my Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. As you can see this miniature orchid isn’t showing any new signs of disease.
My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. This miniature orchid has produced a number of new, healthier looking, leaves over the past month.
My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. This miniature orchid has produced a number of new, healthier looking, leaves over the past month.
My Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015. I've not noticed any new signs of disease on this miniature orchid.
My Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015. I’ve not noticed any new signs of disease on this miniature orchid.
My Aerangis punctata inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. I am not totally convinced of the health of this orchid, it's possible that this orchid is also infected with a virus.
My Aerangis punctata inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. I am not totally convinced of the health of this orchid, it’s possible that this orchid is also infected with a virus.
My Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. Could this be the early signs of a flower developing?
My Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. Could this be the early signs of a flower developing?
My Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015. Could this be the early signs of a flower developing?
My Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015. Could this be the early signs of a flower developing?
A close up of my Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. Could this be the early signs of a flower developing?
A close up of my Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 1st October 2015. Could this be the early signs of a flower developing?

Currently inside my other BiOrbAir terrarium, I have an Ornithophora radicans in flower, you can see photographs of this interesting miniature orchid in flower in my long-term review of my BiOrbAir  (part two).  So it’s exciting to see, what are quite possibly, the very earliest signs of a flower being produced by the Domingoa purpurea, inside this – my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

A close up of the moss in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir. Photograph taken on 7th October 2015.
A close up of the moss in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir. Photograph taken on 7th October 2015.

I’ve been really pleased with the colour and appearance of the moss inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium.  The moss complements my orchids beautifully.

A close up of the moss in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir. Photograph taken on 7th October 2015.
A close up of the moss in my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir. Photograph taken on 7th October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir pictured on 7th October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir pictured on 7th October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 7th October 2015.

15th October 2015

Masdevallia decumana – Colletotrichum leaf spot returns

Today I noticed a dark spot on one of the leaves of the Masdevallia decumana.  I quickly removed the leaf using my long handled terrarium scissors and tweezers.  I did this in two stages, first the leaf was removed, then I removed the remainder of the stem, cutting it right back to the base of the plant.  I ensured that I sterilised my tools before, and after use.

My Madevallia decumana on 15th October 2015, here you can see that one of the leaves of this miniature orchid has a dark brown spot or mark on its leaf. I am not sure when this spot first appeared, I saw it for the first time today and removed it cleanly and promptly, sterilising my tools before and after use.
My Madevallia decumana on 15th October 2015, here you can see that one of the leaves of this miniature orchid has a dark brown spot or mark on its leaf. I am not sure when this spot first appeared, I saw it for the first time today and removed it cleanly and promptly, sterilising my tools before and after use.
The long handled tweezers and scissors from my Reef One Gardening Toolset make removing the infected leaf from my Masdevallia decumana an easy task.
The long handled tweezers and scissors from my Reef One Gardening Toolset make removing a leaf infected with leaf spot, a fungal disease, an easy task.
Removing a leaf with leaf spot from my Masdevallia decumana, using my long handled terrarium toolset from Reef One.
Removing a leaf with leaf spot from my Masdevallia decumana, using my long handled terrarium toolset from Reef One.
Here's the Masdevallia decumana leaf with leaf spot. The leaf as you see here was removed first, then the remainder of the stem was removed, so the plant wasn't left with any of the stem of this leaf, there was no stump left, it was cut right back to the base of the plant.
Here’s the Masdevallia decumana leaf with leaf spot. The leaf as you see here was removed first, then the remainder of the stem was removed, so the plant wasn’t left with any of the stem of this leaf, there was no stump left, it was cut right back to the base of the plant.

My long handled Gardening Toolset from Reef One is so useful.  These long handled tools makes terrarium gardening so much easier.  You can read my review of using these specially designed, long handled tools here.

21st October 2015
I noticed another leaf on my Masdevallia decumana today was also showing very obvious signs of leaf spot – the leaf was progressively yellowing and another dark brown leaf spot was clearly present.  I removed the infected leaf promptly, sterilising my tools before and after use.  You can see photographs of this leaf below.

Here's the leaf I removed from my Masdevallia decumana on 21st October 2015. This miniature orchid is suffering with colletotrichum leaf spot. You can see the underside of this same leaf in my next photograph.
Here’s the leaf I removed from my Masdevallia decumana on 21st October 2015. This miniature orchid is suffering with colletotrichum leaf spot. You can see the underside of this same leaf in my next photograph.
The underside of the Masdevallia decumana leaf I removed on 21st October 2015.
The underside of the Masdevallia decumana leaf I removed on 21st October 2015.

29th October 2015

Another day, and another orchid needs attention.  Today it’s my Aerangis punctata, as you can see in the photographs below, this orchid isn’t looking very healthy.

Here's my Aerangis punctata on the 26th October 2015, it's not looking great, I have been concerned about the health of this orchid since it arrived in the post.
Here’s my Aerangis punctata on the 26th October 2015, it’s not looking great, I have been concerned about the health of this orchid since it arrived in the post.
Here's my Aerangis punctata on the 29th October 2015, as you can see the colour of the lower leaf has changed quite dramatically in just a few days.
Here’s my Aerangis punctata on the 29th October 2015, as you can see the colour of the lower leaf has changed quite dramatically in just a few days.
Here's the leaf I removed from my Aerangis punctata on the 29th October 2015.
Here’s the leaf I removed from my Aerangis punctata on the 29th October 2015.
Here's the underside side of the Aerangis punctata leaf. Photograph taken on 29th October 2015.
Here’s the underside side of the Aerangis punctata leaf. Photograph taken on 29th October 2015.

6th November 2015

You can see a photograph I have just taken of my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium below.  All is looking OK inside this terrarium today…….but only because I have been busy removing more diseased leaves from my miniature orchids……….

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015.

Sadly, my Aerangis fastuosa has been showing signs of the virus that it’s infected with again.

My Aerangis fastuosa on 29th October 2015, this miniature orchid doesn't look too bad in this photograph.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 29th October 2015, this miniature orchid doesn’t look too bad in this photograph.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 2nd November 2015. As you can see one of the lower leaves is yellowing.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 2nd November 2015. As you can see one of the lower leaves is yellowing.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd November 2015. The health of this lower leaf has declined further, as is shown in this photograph.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 3rd November 2015. The health of this lower leaf has declined further, as is shown in this photograph.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015. I couldn't leave it any longer and this lower leaf was removed after this photograph was taken. I sterilised my tools before and after the leaf was removed. You can see the black markings and depressions at the base of the leaf, which is by now quite a bright yellow colour.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015. I couldn’t leave it any longer and this lower leaf was removed after this photograph was taken. I sterilised my tools before and after the leaf was removed. You can see the black markings and depressions at the base of the leaf, which is by now quite a bright yellow colour.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015 after the lower leaf was removed.
My Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015 after the lower leaf was removed.
I removed this leaf from my Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015, as you can see it's showing clear signs of disease.
I removed this leaf from my Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015, as you can see it’s showing clear signs of disease.
A close up of the base of the leaf I removed from my Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015, as you can see this leaf is showing clear signs of disease, with black markings at the base of the leaf and yellowing of the leaf as a whole.
A close up of the base of the leaf I removed from my Aerangis fastuosa on 4th November 2015, as you can see this leaf is showing clear signs of disease, with black markings at the base of the leaf and yellowing of the leaf as a whole.
My Aerangis punctata inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015. This miniature orchid isn't looking very healthy or vibrant.
My Aerangis punctata inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015. This miniature orchid isn’t looking very healthy or vibrant.

Thankfully it’s not entirely bad news – there is some new growth appearing on the miniature orchids in this terrarium, below you can see the very start of some new leaf growth on my Masdevallia decumana.

Here's my Masdevallia decumana on 6th November 2015, you might just be able to see new leaves forming at the base of the plant.
Here’s my Masdevallia decumana on 6th November 2015, you might just be able to see new leaves forming at the base of the plant.
My Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir. It's very exciting as this orchid is in the early stages of producing a flower!
My Domingoa purpurea inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir. It’s very exciting as this orchid is in the early stages of producing a flower!
A rather sweet seedling has popped up in the moss in my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.
A rather sweet seedling has popped up in the moss in my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Angraecum equitans inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir on 6th November 2015.
My Angraecum equitans inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir on 6th November 2015.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum inside my miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015.
My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum inside my miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015.
My Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on 6th November 2015.

8th November 2015

Can you leave the BiOrbAir terrarium for three weeks without attention?

Yesterday I received a very good question from a reader, Justin, who asked if you could leave the BiOrbAir for about three weeks without needing to add water to the terrarium.  I have previously left my BiOrbAir terrariums for this length of time without attention, but it’s always good to demonstrate the experience.  So, I topped up the base reservoirs in both my BiOrbAir terrariums with rainwater on the 6th November 2015.  At the same time I topped up the Humidimist in the reservoir for the ultrasonic mister.  I will report back and let you know when they both need topping up again.

The water level indicator on my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 8th November 2015. The rainwater in the base reservoir for this terrarium was topped up on 6th November 2015. I will update this review when I next need to top up the base reservoir of this terrarium with rain water. I also topped up the reservoir for this BiOrbAir’s ultrasonic misting unit with Humidimist at the same time, so I will update you when this next requires a top up.
The water level indicator on my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 8th November 2015. The rainwater in the base reservoir for this terrarium was topped up on 6th November 2015. I will update this review when I next need to top up the base reservoir of this terrarium with rain water. I also topped up the reservoir for this BiOrbAir’s ultrasonic misting unit with Humidimist at the same time, so I will update you when this next requires a top up.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 12th November 2015 - it's been a week since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 12th November 2015 – it’s been a week since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 19th November 2015 - it's been exactly two weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 19th November 2015 – it’s been exactly two weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 26th November 2015 - it's been exactly three weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 26th November 2015 – it’s been exactly three weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 4th December 2015 - it's been just over four weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on 4th December 2015 – it’s been just over four weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on the 10th December 2015 - it's been five weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir of this terrarium.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on the 10th December 2015 – it’s been five weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir of this terrarium.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on the 17th December 2015 - it's been six weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir of this terrarium.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on the 17th December 2015 – it’s been six weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir of this terrarium.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on the 24th December 2015 - it's been seven weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir of this terrarium.
The water-level indicator on my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir on the 24th December 2015 – it’s been seven weeks since I topped up the rainwater in the base reservoir of this terrarium.

26th November 2015

I topped up the reservoirs for my ultra-sonic misting units in both my BiOrbAir terrariums at the same time, so that I could monitor how often the reservoir for the misting unit needed to be topped up with Humidimist.  After a week, I noted that both my BiOrbAir misting unit reservoirs were 2/3 full – at this time it was 7 days from when I last topped them up.  Two weeks later, the misting unit reservoirs were about 1/3 full.  Three weeks later, the reservoir for my BiOrbAir misting unit had only a couple of mm of Humidimist left.  The lights started to flash on both BiOrbAir terrariums, to alert me that they had run out of Humidimist, on Sunday 29th November 2015 – 23 days after I topped them up.  So from monitoring my BiOrbAir terrariums over this period of time, I would advise that the Humidimist will need topping up every three weeks to maintain the constant humidity levels within the terrarium.

24th December 2015

It’s now seven weeks since I last topped the base reservoir of both my BiOrbAir terrariums – I topped up both of my BiOrbAir terrariums with rain water at the same time, and I have been monitoring them since then.  I realise that in my photographs above, in the second photograph of the water-level indicator, it looks as if the terrarium has had a top up – it hasn’t!  I am unsure if the angle I was at when I took the photographs has made the water level look higher/lower in the photographs, or if somehow the rainwater I poured in and over the cork and moss takes longer than I have anticipated to drain through into the base reservoir, and as a consequence this reading and the amount of rainwater inside the terrarium wasn’t fully recorded in the first photograph.

Anyway, as you can see, the rainwater in the base reservoir in my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium has been sufficient to last this BiOrbAir terrarium, planted with moss, and miniature orchids mounted on bark, for seven weeks.  The water level in the base water reservoir inside my other BiOrbAir terrarium registered as lower than the reading for this Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium after the same period of time had passed.  My other BiOrbAir terrarium has been planted with ferns, miniature orchids, mosses and other terrarium plants, as opposed to the BiOrbAir featured in this trial, which is planted with mosses and miniature orchids which are mounted on bark.  Naturally the plants featured in my other terrarium require more water.  The water level indicator for my other BiOrbAir terrarium registered as about 10% full after seven weeks.

I would feel confident to leave either of my BiOrbAir terrariums unattended for a period of 3 weeks, provided I had topped up the Humidimist in the ultra-sonic misting unit and topped up the base reservoir with rain water just prior to leaving, and topped both up again on my return.

Following this experiment, I would estimate that you might only need to top up your base reservoir with water every five weeks, depending of course on the planting within your BiOrbAir terrarium.  Why am I not recommending that you leave your BiOrbAir for six weeks, or seven, as I have clearly done so myself without a problem?  Well because the capillary matting within the BiOrbAir, works by drawing up water from the base reservoir below, the capillary matting has longer sections, like tails, that are permanently submerged within the rainwater, these longer tail sections draw the water up from the base reservoir, and moisten the coir compost above.  Naturally the tails, or longer sections of capillary matting, require sufficient water to cover them to enable an efficient capillary watering system, it’s not worth leaving your terrarium for as long as possible, unless of course you’re on holiday, or in an emergency situation, as you don’t want to take a risk that your plants might not have sufficient water.  It takes only a moment to check the water level in your base reservoir, and just a few moments more to top up the rain water.  Keeping your BiOrbAir terrarium watered is so simple and easy to do, it’s better to monitor your terrarium regularly, and in doing so provide your plants with everything they require for healthy growth.  I’ve now topped up both my BiOrbAir terrariums’ base reservoirs with rainwater.

10th December 2015

Here's my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 25th November 2015.
Here’s my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 25th November 2015.

I’ve been so disappointed with the condition of my Aerangis punctata since it arrived in the post – this miniature Orchid has never looked very healthy or strong.  The Aerangis punctata has continued to decline since I included it in my BiOrbAir terrarium, as you can see in the following photographs………..

I took this photograph of my Aerangis punctata on 25th November 2015.
I took this photograph of my Aerangis punctata on 25th November 2015.
I took this photograph of my Aerangis punctata on the 27th November 2015.
I took this photograph of my Aerangis punctata on the 27th November 2015.
I took this photograph of the Aerangis punctata on the 28th November 2015. I've not thought this Orchid to be in good health since it arrived in the post, the decline of this miniature orchid can be seen in the following photos.
I took this photograph of the Aerangis punctata on the 28th November 2015. I’ve not thought this Orchid to be in good health since it arrived in the post, the decline of this miniature orchid can be seen in the following photos.
On the morning of the 29th November 2015, I noticed that this leaf had fallen from the Aerangis punctata.
On the morning of the 29th November 2015, I noticed that this leaf had fallen from the Aerangis punctata.
On the morning of the 29th November 2015, I noticed that this leaf had fallen from the Aerangis punctata, in this photograph you can see the underside of the leaf.
On the morning of the 29th November 2015, I noticed that this leaf had fallen from the Aerangis punctata, in this photograph you can see the underside of the leaf.
Here's my Aerangis punctata as pictured on 2nd December 2015.
Here’s my Aerangis punctata as pictured on 2nd December 2015.
Here's my Aerangis punctata as pictured on 10th December 2015, not a pretty sight! I have now removed this miniature Orchid from my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium and disposed of it.
Here’s my Aerangis punctata as pictured on 10th December 2015, not a pretty sight! I have now removed this miniature Orchid from my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium and disposed of it.

Springtails

A close up of an adult Springtail, also known as Collembola.
A close up of an adult Springtail, also known as Collembola.

The Springtail, or Collembola, pictured above was alive as I photographed it.  It was quite amazing that I was able to take this photograph, as Springtails, hence their common name, have an appendage to their abdomen, known as a furcula, which enables the Springtail to jump remarkable distances.

In this photograph of my Masdevallia decumana you might just be able to make out a tiny brown blur of a Springtail or Collembola. Pictured here on 2nd December 2015.
In this photograph of my Masdevallia decumana you might just be able to make out a tiny brown blur of a Springtail or Collembola. Pictured here on 2nd December 2015.

My Masdevallia decumana has been growing well, producing new leaves and roots, as you can see in the two photographs above and below.

My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on 10th December 2015.
My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on 10th December 2015.
I first noticed that my Domingoa purpurea was producing a second flower on 24th November 2015, when I took this photograph. In this image you can see the very first stages of the Domingoa purpurea flowers being produced.
I first noticed that my Domingoa purpurea was producing a second flower on 24th November 2015, when I took this photograph. In this image you can see the very first stages of the Domingoa purpurea flowers being produced.

On the 24th November 2015, I noticed that my Domingoa purpurea was in the earliest stages of producing a second flower.  There’s a very long way to go yet before this miniature Orchid flowers, but it’s very exciting all the same!

My Domingoa purpurea is in the earliest stages of producing a second flower. Pictured here on 27th November 2015 inside my BiOrbAir terrarium from Reef One.
My Domingoa purpurea is in the earliest stages of producing a second flower. Pictured here on 27th November 2015 inside my BiOrbAir terrarium from Reef One.
My Domingoa purpurea is producing a second flower. Pictured here on 29th November 2015 inside my BiOrbAir terrarium from Reef One.
My Domingoa purpurea is producing a second flower. Pictured here on 29th November 2015 inside my BiOrbAir terrarium from Reef One.
Here's the second, flower of my Domingoa purpurea, in the earliest stages of growth. This orchid produces its flowers in succession.
Here’s the second, flower of my Domingoa purpurea, in the earliest stages of growth. This orchid produces its flowers in succession.
Diplocaulobium abbreviatum pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 1st December 2015.
Diplocaulobium abbreviatum pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on 1st December 2015.
Diplocaulobium abbreviatum pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on the 10th December 2015.
Diplocaulobium abbreviatum pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on the 10th December 2015.
Here's my Aerangis fastuosa as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on the 2nd December 2015. I love this miniature Orchid, I hope so much that it will improve and grow well inside my BiOrbAir. In this photograph you can see two of the aerial roots that help to sustain this orchid. It's a little blurred in this image, but the aerial roots are covered in velamen, a protective layer.
Here’s my Aerangis fastuosa as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir terrarium on the 2nd December 2015. I love this miniature Orchid, I hope so much that it will improve and grow well inside my BiOrbAir. In this photograph you can see two of the aerial roots that help to sustain this orchid. It’s a little blurred in this image, but the aerial roots are covered in velamen, a protective layer.
Sadly today, on the 10th December 2015, I noticed another yellowing leaf on my Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Sadly today, on the 10th December 2015, I noticed another yellowing leaf on my Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
On the 11th December 2015, I removed this yellowing leaf from my Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
On the 11th December 2015, I removed this yellowing leaf from my Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
On the 11th December 2015, I removed this yellowing leaf from my Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
On the 11th December 2015, I removed this yellowing leaf from my Aerangis fastuosa inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Terrarium toadstool

I noticed this tiny toadstool inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 4th December 2015 and quickly took a couple of photos. I didn't remove the toadstool straight away - as I wasn't sure that the photographs I had taken were in focus.
I noticed this tiny toadstool inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 4th December 2015 and quickly took a couple of photos. I didn’t remove the toadstool straight away – as I wasn’t sure that the photographs I had taken were in focus.

I noticed the tiny toadstool you see pictured here, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 4th December 2015.  As I noticed the toadstool, I only had a brief moment to take a couple of photographs, which I expected to be blurred, so I left the toadstool as it was, and planned to photograph the toadstool again, as soon as I was able.  My next opportunity was on the 6th December 2015, but as I was interrupted whilst taking my first photograph, I again left the toadstool until 7th December 2015.  This time I took a few more photographs, and then I removed the toadstool!

Here's the other photograph I took of the tiny toadstool on 4th December 2015.
Here’s the other photograph I took of the tiny toadstool on 4th December 2015.
This is the same toadstool, pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 6th December 2015.
This is the same toadstool, pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 6th December 2015.
A close up of the same toadstool, this photograph was taken on the 7th December 2015.
A close up of the same toadstool, this photograph was taken on the 7th December 2015.
Here's the same toadstool again inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 7th December 2015.
Here’s the same toadstool again inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 7th December 2015.
And the final image taken on 7th December 2015, just before I removed the toadstool from the terrarium.
And the final image taken on 7th December 2015, just before I removed the toadstool from the terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on 8th December 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on 8th December 2015.
My Angraecum equitans pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 10th December 2015.
My Angraecum equitans pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 10th December 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on 8th December 2015.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on 8th December 2015.

28th December 2015

Masdevallia decumana recovering

Happily I can report that my Masdevallia decumana seems to now be thriving within my BiOrbAir terrarium, here’s a photograph below that I took a couple of days ago.

My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on 20th December 2015. I am so happy to see this miniature orchid looking so healthy! This Masdevallia decumana has produced a number of new leaves and a number of new aerial roots, which is great to see; the leaves are a beautiful, and very healthy looking green colour.
My Masdevallia decumana inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on 20th December 2015. I am so happy to see this miniature orchid looking so healthy! This Masdevallia decumana has produced a number of new leaves and a number of new aerial roots, which is great to see; the leaves are a beautiful, and very healthy looking green colour.

1st January 2016

Happy new year!  Here are some photographs I took today of the miniature orchids growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium:

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana as pictured on the 1st January 2016. As you can see this miniature orchid is looking very healthy, and has readily produced new leaves and aerial roots.
My Masdevallia decumana as pictured on the 1st January 2016. As you can see this miniature orchid is looking very healthy, and has readily produced new leaves and aerial roots.
Here's my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
Here’s my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana as pictured on the 1st January 2016. As you can see this miniature orchid is looking very healthy, and has readily produced new leaves and aerial roots.
My Masdevallia decumana as pictured on the 1st January 2016. As you can see this miniature orchid is looking very healthy, and has readily produced new leaves and aerial roots.
Here's my aerangis fastuosa, as pictured on 1st January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I really like this miniature orchid and just hope it can survive the virus it's suffering with. I would hate to lose this orchid.
Here’s my aerangis fastuosa, as pictured on 1st January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I really like this miniature orchid and just hope it can survive the virus it’s suffering with. I would hate to lose this orchid.
My Aerangis fastuosa as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
My Aerangis fastuosa as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
My Angraecum equitans as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
My Angraecum equitans as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
Here's my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
Here’s my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016.
Here's my Domingoa purpurea as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016. I am enjoying watching the early stages of this orchid coming into flower; as you can see in the photograph, two flowers are being produced, one is more advanced than the other - this miniature orchid flowers in succession.
Here’s my Domingoa purpurea as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016. I am enjoying watching the early stages of this orchid coming into flower; as you can see in the photograph, two flowers are being produced, one is more advanced than the other – this miniature orchid flowers in succession.
This is a close up of the roots of my Domingoa purpurea. I have so enjoyed watching the roots of this miniature orchid grow into the cork bark inside my BiOrbAir terrarium. This miniature orchid has so far thrived inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
This is a close up of the roots of my Domingoa purpurea. I have so enjoyed watching the roots of this miniature orchid grow into the cork bark inside my BiOrbAir terrarium. This miniature orchid has so far thrived inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
This is a close up of the roots of my Domingoa purpurea. I have so enjoyed watching the roots of this miniature orchid grow into the cork bark inside my BiOrbAir terrarium. This miniature orchid has so far thrived inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
This is a close up of the roots of my Domingoa purpurea. I have so enjoyed watching the roots of this miniature orchid grow into the cork bark inside my BiOrbAir terrarium. This miniature orchid has so far thrived inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
Here's my Domingoa purpurea as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016. This miniature orchid has anchored itself firmly into the cork bark, and is thriving inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Here’s my Domingoa purpurea as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016. This miniature orchid has anchored itself firmly into the cork bark, and is thriving inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Here's my Domingoa purpurea as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016. As you can see in this photograph, the miniature orchid is growing very close to the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium!
Here’s my Domingoa purpurea as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 1st January 2016. As you can see in this photograph, the miniature orchid is growing very close to the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium!
A closer photograph of my miniature orchids mounted on cork bark inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016. As you can see in this photograph, my Domingoa purpurea is growing very close to the top of my BiOrbAir Terrarium!
A closer photograph of my miniature orchids mounted on cork bark inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016. As you can see in this photograph, my Domingoa purpurea is growing very close to the top of my BiOrbAir Terrarium!
A closer photograph of my miniature orchids mounted on cork bark inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
A closer photograph of my miniature orchids mounted on cork bark inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 1st January 2016.

10th January 2016

My Domingoa purpurea pictured as the flower stem was measured on the 10th January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. The longest flower stem so far measures 12cm.
My Domingoa purpurea pictured as the flower stem was measured on the 10th January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. The longest flower stem so far measures 12cm.

I’ve just recently replanted my other BiOrbAir terrarium – I now have five miniature orchids, each mounted on cork bark, growing inside this terrarium.  If you’re interested to have a look at this terrarium and see the orchids, please click here.

15th January 2016

It’s very exciting to have a Restrepia sanguinea in flower inside my other BiOrbAir terrarium!  But this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium is proving just as exciting!

My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 9th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower and is in the earliest stage of producing flowers.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 9th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower and is in the earliest stage of producing flowers.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 15th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower having produced three flower buds.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 15th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower having produced three flower buds.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 15th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower having produced three flower buds.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 15th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower having produced three flower buds.
Here's my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum as pictured on the 15th January 2016. This miniature orchid has produced some new leaves since it has been growing inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
Here’s my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum as pictured on the 15th January 2016. This miniature orchid has produced some new leaves since it has been growing inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.

Orchid quarantine

Up until now, I have only included orchids purchased from one supplier inside each of my BiOrbAir terrariums – all of the miniature orchids inside this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium were purchased at Orchids-shop.eu and the miniature orchids growing inside my other BiOrbAir terrarium were all purchased from Burnham Nurseries.  This was intentional, as some of the miniature orchids I purchased from Orchids-shop.eu were suffering from fungal problems, and at least one virus.  So I purposely kept these orchids separate from the orchids I purchased from Burnham Nurseries, which were all in excellent health when I purchased them, as I wanted to avoid any risk of transmitting any viruses or fungal problems to my healthy orchids.

It’s always a good idea to quarantine any new plants, so that you can be certain that your new plants are in good health, before introducing them to your collection.  This way you can avoid introducing pests and disease to your plants.  Wherever you can, keep plants with health problems separate, and always sterilise your tools before and after each use, and before tending to another plant.

I have such affection for Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, a very cute miniature orchid, that has grown so well, and is just coming into flower inside my other BiOrbAir terrarium, that I decided to purchase another plant from Burnham Nurseries.  When my Lepanthopsis arrived in the post I noticed it had two leaves with black marks at their tips, so I photographed the plants, and then removed these damaged leaves.

Here's a photograph of my Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' taken just after I received my parcel from Burnham nurseries.
Here’s a photograph of my Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ taken just after I received my parcel from Burnham nurseries.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' pictured just after it arrived in the post.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ pictured just after it arrived in the post.
A close up of one of the damaged leaves on my new Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' pictured just after it arrived in the post.
A close up of one of the damaged leaves on my new Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ pictured just after it arrived in the post.

This Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ has now been mounted on cork bark and placed inside this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir.  This is such a super little orchid to grow, it is very small in size, so doesn’t take up much space inside your terrarium.  Once it reaches flowering size Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ flowers frequently, this is a super miniature orchid to include as part of your collection, however small or large your collection is.

My new Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016, after I had removed two of this miniature orchid's leaves.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016, after I had removed two of this miniature orchid’s leaves.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016, after I had removed two of this miniature orchid's leaves.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016, after I had removed two of this miniature orchid’s leaves.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016. You might just be able to make out the tiny flowering spikes on this Lepanthopsis and also the flower bud on the Masdevallia decumana behind.
My new Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016. You might just be able to make out the tiny flowering spikes on this Lepanthopsis and also the flower bud on the Masdevallia decumana behind.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
My Angraecum equitans as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016. I am glad to see this orchid has produced new leaves since it's been growing inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Angraecum equitans as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016. I am glad to see this orchid has produced new leaves since it’s been growing inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower having produced three flower buds.
My Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, this miniature orchid is just coming into flower having produced three flower buds.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
My Aerangis fastuosa as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016.
My Aerangis fastuosa as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 17th January 2016.
A close up of my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
A close up of my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
My Domingoa purpurea, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 17th January 2016. As you can see this miniature orchid produces very long flowering stems! This stem will grow longer still before it flowers.
My Domingoa purpurea, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 17th January 2016. As you can see this miniature orchid produces very long flowering stems! This stem will grow longer still before it flowers.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 17th January 2016, after the addition of a new miniature orchid, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, which was first mounted onto a piece of cork bark, and then added to the terrarium.

21st January 2016

Masdevallia decumana flower buds

My Masdevallia decumana about to flower, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 21st January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana about to flower, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 21st January 2016.
A close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 21st January 2016.
A close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 21st January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana in bud, as pictured on the 21st January 2016, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Masdevallia decumana in bud, as pictured on the 21st January 2016, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
The largest of my Masdevallia decumana flower buds as pictured on the 24th January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.
The largest of my Masdevallia decumana flower buds as pictured on the 24th January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Masdevallia decumana has so far produced three flower buds, the largest of the three can be seen on the left hand side in this photograph.
My Masdevallia decumana has so far produced three flower buds, the largest of the three can be seen on the left hand side in this photograph.
The largest of my Masdevallia decumana flower buds as pictured on the 24th January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.
The largest of my Masdevallia decumana flower buds as pictured on the 24th January 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 22nd January 2016. Inside this terrarium my Domingoa, Masdevallia and Lepanthopsis are all coming into flower!
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 22nd January 2016. Inside this terrarium my Domingoa, Masdevallia and Lepanthopsis are all coming into flower!
Here's a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here’s a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here's a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here’s a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here's a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here’s a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here's a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here’s a close up of the largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here's a close up of the second largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
Here’s a close up of the second largest flower bud on my Masdevallia decumana, a miniature orchid that I enjoy growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This photograph was taken on the 25th January 2016.
A close up of the flower buds produced by one of my most recent purchases - Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', a miniature orchid that I recently purchased from Burnham Nurseries.
A close up of the flower buds produced by one of my most recent purchases – Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, a miniature orchid that I recently purchased from Burnham Nurseries. Photograph taken on the 25th January 2016.

26th January 2016

Masdevallia decumana flowering

The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened this morning!  It’s so wonderful to see this beautiful miniature orchid in flower inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.

Masdevallia decumana in flower, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 26th January 2016.
Masdevallia decumana in flower, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium, on the 26th January 2016.
The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened on the 26th January 2016, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened on the 26th January 2016, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016. The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened inside this terrarium today.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016. The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened inside this terrarium today.
The first of my Masdevallia decumana flowers opened today inside my BiOrbAir terrarium. This miniature orchid has two smaller buds, which are still to open.
The first of my Masdevallia decumana flowers opened today inside my BiOrbAir terrarium. This miniature orchid has two smaller buds, which are still to open.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 26th January 2016. My Masdevallia decumana is flowering inside this terrarium, and two of my other miniature orchids are in the earliest stages of flowering.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 26th January 2016. My Masdevallia decumana is flowering inside this terrarium, and two of my other miniature orchids are in the earliest stages of flowering.
My Masdevallia decumana pictured in flower inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 26th January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana pictured in flower inside my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 26th January 2016.
A close up of the beautiful markings on the petals of Masdevallia decumana, a beautiful miniature orchid that is currently flowering inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings on the petals of Masdevallia decumana, a beautiful miniature orchid that is currently flowering inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings on the petals of my Masdevallia decumana, which is currently in flower inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings on the petals of my Masdevallia decumana, which is currently in flower inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings in the centre of this beautiful Masdevallia decumana flower, which opened today inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings in the centre of this beautiful Masdevallia decumana flower, which opened today inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings in the centre of my Masdevallia decumana flower, which is currently flowering inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of the beautiful markings in the centre of my Masdevallia decumana flower, which is currently flowering inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.
A close up of my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016. The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened today. Inside this terrarium Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' has flower buds which will open any day now, and Domingoa purpurea is also in the early stages of producing flowers.
A close up of my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016. The first flower on my Masdevallia decumana opened today. Inside this terrarium Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ has flower buds which will open any day now, and Domingoa purpurea is also in the early stages of producing flowers.
Masdevallia decumana flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 26th January 2016.
Masdevallia decumana flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 26th January 2016.
A Masdevallia decumana flower.
A Masdevallia decumana flower.
The ultra sonic misting unit in operation inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016.
The ultra sonic misting unit in operation inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016.
The ultra sonic misting unit in operation inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016. The misting unit will operate automatically if the humidity level drops below 75 RH. There's a discrete lever inside the BiOrbAir, that when pressed for a second operates the misting unit, so you easily mist your plants as often as you'd like to.
The ultra sonic misting unit in operation inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 26th January 2016. The misting unit will operate automatically if the humidity level drops below 75 RH. There’s a discrete lever inside the BiOrbAir, that when pressed for a second operates the misting unit, so you easily mist your plants as often as you’d like to.
My Domingoa purpurea has almost reached the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium, there's a gap of less than a centimeter from the top of the flower spike to the top of the terrarium! Photographed on the 26th January 2016.
My Domingoa purpurea has almost reached the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium, there’s a gap of less than a centimeter from the top of the flower spike to the top of the terrarium! Photographed on the 26th January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana in flower, inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 26th January 2016.
My Masdevallia decumana in flower, inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 26th January 2016.
A close up of one of the Masdevallia decumana flowers inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium. Photograph taken on the 26th January 2016.
A close up of one of the Masdevallia decumana flowers inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium. Photograph taken on the 26th January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 26th January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 26th January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 26th January 2016.
My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 26th January 2016.

28th January 2016

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ flowering

The first flower on my Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ opened this morning!  I only very recently purchased this miniature orchid online from Burnham Nurseries, a super UK orchid nursery based in South Devon.  I have another ‘Stalky’ that I also purchased from Burnham Nurseries in 2015, which is coming into flower inside another of my BiOrbAir terrariums, you can see this terrarium by clicking here.  I am so fond of this miniature orchid, I am so happy to see the first of its flowers this morning.

I have two miniature orchids in flower inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium - a Masdevallia decumana, the larger flower at the forefront of this photograph, and Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' the little blurred purple flower you might just be able to make out, on the right hand side of this photograph.
I have two miniature orchids in flower inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium – a Masdevallia decumana, the larger flower at the forefront of this photograph, and Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ the little blurred purple flower you might just be able to make out, on the right hand side of this photograph.
Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' as pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I purchased this miniature orchid from Burnham Nurseries in the UK.
Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ as pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I purchased this miniature orchid from Burnham Nurseries in the UK.

If you plan to grow Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, avoid the temptation to remove the older flower stalks, as these stems will continue to produce flowers, sometimes randomly after a gap in flowering, when you could have mistakenly believed the stem to be dead.

Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' pictured with a British five pence piece to show the diminutive size of its flowers. As pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ pictured with a British five pence piece to show the diminutive size of its flowers. As pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' as pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid is a real joy to see.
Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ as pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid is a real joy to see.
A close up of Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' as pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A close up of Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ as pictured on the 28th January 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A close up of the miniature orchids which have been mounted on cork bark, and are growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2016.
A close up of the miniature orchids which have been mounted on cork bark, and are growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2016.
My Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' in flower, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 30th January 2016.
My Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ in flower, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 30th January 2016.
My Domingoa purpurea flower spike has almost reached the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium! This photograph was taken on the 30th January 2016.
My Domingoa purpurea flower spike has almost reached the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium! This photograph was taken on the 30th January 2016.
The longest flower spike of my Domingoa purpurea has almost reached the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium!
The longest flower spike of my Domingoa purpurea has almost reached the top of my BiOrbAir terrarium!
My Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2016. I so enjoy watching these beautiful miniature orchids growing inside my automated, specialised terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2016. I so enjoy watching these beautiful miniature orchids growing inside my automated, specialised terrarium.
Here's my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured in flower, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 30th January 2016. This miniature orchid produces very large flowers which cannot fail to impress.
Here’s my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured in flower, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 30th January 2016. This miniature orchid produces very large flowers which cannot fail to impress.
Here's another photograph of my Masdevallia decumana flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Here’s another photograph of my Masdevallia decumana flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
My Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2016. Here you can see my my Masdevallia decumana flowering and my Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', which is also flowering - you might be able to just make out its teeny, tiny flower buds below the Masdevallia.
My Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2016. Here you can see my my Masdevallia decumana flowering and my Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, which is also flowering – you might be able to just make out its teeny, tiny flower buds below the Masdevallia.

To read the second part of my Miniature Orchid Trial – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir (part two), please click here.

Other articles and links that may interest you……….

To see the first part of my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, please click here.

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To find out how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark or other wood mounts, please click here.

To read about the new features that the new 2017 BiOrbAir terrarium offers, please click here.

To see the planting list for this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, please click here.

To read a longer planting list for terrariums and bottle gardens, which includes a wide variety of different terrarium plants, please click here.

To see a planting list of miniature orchids, suitable for growing in terrariums, please click here.

To read about the special features of the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To read the first part of my long-term review of the BiOrbAir, this terrarium is planted with miniature orchids, ferns, mosses and other terrarium plants, please click here.

To read the second part of my long-term review of the BiOrbAir, this terrarium is planted with ferns, mosses and other terrarium plants, please click here.

To read the third part of my long-term review of the BiOrbAir, this terrarium is planted with miniature orchids, ferns, mosses and other terrarium plants, please click here.

To read about using decorative features in terrariums and bottle gardens, please click here.

To see my suggestions of innovative, interesting, useful and fun gifts for gardeners, please click here.

To go to the other extreme and read about the largest orchid in the world, Grammatophyllum speciosum, which started flowering at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in August 2015, please click here

To read about Suttons Seeds F1 Sweet Corn ‘Bodacious’ seeds, and how to grow these seeds indoors to produce sweet, intensely flavoured shoots, please click here.

To read about my 2015 Sweet Pea Trial to find out the best time to sow Sweet Pea seeds, please click here

To read about reputable suppliers of Snowdrops sold ‘in the green’, please click here.

To read about Daffodils, please click here.

To read about growing mushrooms indoors – I grew some delicious oyster mushrooms, including some edible pink mushrooms!  Please click here.

Other articles you might like:

3 thoughts on “BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir

    1. Hi there,

      I didn’t glue any of the Orchids to the cork – what I did was I made holes in the cork, using a fine drill bit for some of the thicker cork pieces, and a large needle for the thinner pieces of cork. I then used clear fishing line, which I threaded through the holes and I used this to mount the Orchids onto the cork bark. Each of the orchids has a little piece of moss placed directly under where they are mounted to, and I also used the odd tiny fragment of moss to soften the fishing line where I needed to – I didn’t want to use the fishing line like a cheese wire and damage the orchids! All of the Orchids I have mounted are epiphytes and live naturally on trees or other plants – you couldn’t use this method of growing for every Orchid species.

      I am so glad that you are also enjoying your BiOrbAir terrarium – I just love mine so much!

      If you have any other questions just ask – I’ve got quite a number of meetings coming up, but I will always reply to any questions as soon as I can.

      Best wishes
      Beth

    2. Hello Wing,
      I just thought I’d let you know, I have now changed the way I mount my orchids onto the cork bark – you can see all the details in my latest two reviews of the BiOrbAir. I hope you’re enjoying your indoor gardening.
      Best wishes
      Beth

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *