The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium (part two)

Welcome to the second part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial – growing epiphytic orchids, which are endemic to Madagascar, inside the BiOrbAir terrarium.

My reason for planting this very special terrarium with orchids that are endemic to Madagascar, was to highlight and raise awareness of the fragility of Madagascar.  I wanted showcase the beauty of some of Madagascar’s plants, with the hope that by sharing these images I would encourage more love, protection, and support for Madagascar.  Many of the orchids that are seen growing in Madagascar are not found anywhere else on Earth, so it really is a unique and very special place.

To learn more about Madagascar and the vital work in conservation and research that is being undertaken by the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC), a non-profit, non governmental organisation (NGO), please click here.  To read the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC) blog, please click here.

The BiOrbAir terrarium that I have used to plant up these rare orchids, was designed by Barry Reynolds and is available from BiOrb.  The orchid plants that are featured inside this terrarium were grown in cultivation and not taken from the wild.

My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2017.
The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 2nd June 2017. Inside this terrarium, Aerangis citrata and Aeranthes arachnites are in bud, but have yet to flower.

The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Planting List

  • Aerangis citrata
  • Aerangis fastuosa
  • Aerangis macrocentra
  • Aerangis modesta
  • Aerangis punctata
  • Aerangis sp.
  • Aeranthes arachnites
  • Angraecum didieri 

Many readers have asked about the growth and health of an unknown Aerangis specimen, which which I was previously growing inside another of my BiOrbAir terrariums.  A recent terrarium update, led to this older BiOrbAir terrarium being emptied, and then re-planted with different orchids.  So no current updates for this particular Aerangis had been listed for the past few months.   I understand the interest in this Aerangis, so consequently, I have decided to pop this miniature Aerangis orchid inside this terrarium, so that you can follow the plant’s growth, development, or decline here.  I believe this Aerangis also hails from Madagascar.

You can see the full planting list for this terrarium here, where you’ll find more details about each of these orchids, together with the details of all of the nurseries and suppliers where I purchased my orchids, mosses, and cork for this terrarium.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2017.
The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 2nd June 2017. Inside this terrarium, Aerangis citrata and Aeranthes arachnites are in bud, but have yet to flower.

Miniature epiphytic orchids from Madagascar

My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2017.
The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 2nd June 2017. Inside this terrarium, Aerangis citrata and Aeranthes arachnites are in bud, but have yet to flower.

Aerangis citrata

Aerangis citrata, pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 10th May 2017.

I think one or two of this Aerangis citrata specimen’s leaves were damaged in transit.  One of the leaves was bent when it arrived with me.  This leaf has continued dying at a steady rate since I purchased the plant, whereas the black markings on one of the other leaf tips has not noticeably grown in size since it has been in my care.  Naturally I will keep an eye on these marks.

I noticed a flower spike on this Aerangis citrata specimen in early May, a lovely surprise!

Aerangis citrata, as pictured on the 2nd June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Aerangis citrata, pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 2nd June 2017.

Aerangis fastuosa

Aerangis fastuosa, pictured on the 2nd June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

This Aerangis fastuosa specimen has just finished flowering, the plant is now producing a new leaf.  One of this orchid’s older leaves had died and was recently removed, but this is probably not evident in these photographs as the faded leaf was hidden by the newer, younger leaves which had grown over the old leaf.

I hope this lovely orchid will acclimatise to this new Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, and will grow happily and healthily inside this terrarium.

Aerangis fastuosa, pictured on the 2nd June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis macrocentra

Aerangis macrocentra, as pictured on the 2nd June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I have two Aerangis macrocentra specimens growing inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, both purchased from Burnham Nurseries at the same time.  These Aerangis macrocentra specimens are young plants, so far they seem to be growing well.

Aerangis modesta

Aerangis modesta roots, pictured on the 2nd June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

This Aerangis modesta specimen has one or two leaves which have developed black marks over the time that this plant has been in my care.  I think these marks are from the plant being damaged in transit or delivery.  This orchid dropped one of its older leaves a couple of weeks after purchase.

I always expect some leaves to be discarded from any new plants that I purchase.  This is due to the stress that the plant undergoes, as it’s moved from one environment (where the plant was established), to another new environment, which may be quite different.  Not forgetting the stresses caused by transporting the plants, and any damage, or changing temperatures etc that the plants may have endured during delivery.

By dropping a leaf or two, the plant is helping itself to survive and to adjust to its new growing conditions, as the plant has effectively made itself smaller.  By dropping the older leaves the plant is better able to conserve its energy to have a better chance of surviving in its new environment, as the plant will have less leaf space to supply water to etc.

Aerangis punctata

Aerangis punctata, pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 2nd June 2017.

Aerangis punctata is a slow glowing orchid.  This Aerangis punctata specimen has not changed its appearance during the time that this plant has been in my care.  I am not aware of this orchid dropping any old leaves, or producing any new leaves.  I hope that this Aerangis punctata specimen will grow well inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis species

The unknown Aerangis species, pictured on the 2nd June 2017, inside the Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

This unknown Aerangis specimen seems to be growing well so far inside this terrarium.  This miniature orchid is producing new leaves, and the plant’s roots are also developing well.  Fingers crossed for this orchid’s survival!

Aeranthes arachnites

Aeranthes arachnites, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 2nd June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 2nd June 2017.

This Aeranthes arachnites specimen was in bud when I purchased the plant in April 2017.  The flowering stem was approximately 25cm long when I purchased the plant, this same flowering stem now measures about 40cm!  Happily I can report that this Aeranthes arachnites specimen has recently started producing a second flowering stem, which you can see in the photographs above!

This orchid is also in the process of producing new leaves, which is great!

Angraecum didieri

Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 2nd June 2017.
Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 2nd June 2017.

This Angraecum didieri specimen’s roots are developing well, having extended themselves by 2.5cm during the couple of months that the plant has been growing inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.  This dear orchid has produced one large leaf since the plant’s introduction to this terrarium, and some smaller leaves are also being produced by the plant, which is great to see!

The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 2nd June 2017. Inside this terrarium, Aerangis citrata and Aeranthes arachnites are in bud, but have yet to flower.
The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 2nd June 2017. Inside this terrarium, Aerangis citrata and Aeranthes arachnites are in bud, but have yet to flower.

To head straight to the next review instalment and see this Aeranthes arachnites specimen’s blooms in their full glory, please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

To read about the great new features of the 2017 BiOrbAir terrarium, please click here.

To read a Planting List of a wide range and variety of beautiful plants which are suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To see a Planting List of beautiful, miniature orchids, suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To read about the Writhlington Orchid Project, please click here.

To read about the Queen of Orchids, Grammatophyllum speciosum, and this plant’s flowering at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in September 2015, please click here.

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