The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium (part three)

Welcome to the third part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial – growing small and miniature, epiphytic orchids, which are endemic to Madagascar, inside the BiOrbAir terrarium.

My reason for planting this very special terrarium with orchids that are endemic to Madagascar, was to highlight and raise awareness of the fragility of Madagascar.  Madagascar is a wonderful and exclusive, unique place.  I wanted showcase the beauty of some of Madagascar’s plants, with the hope that by sharing these images I would encourage more love, protection, and support for Madagascar.  Many of the orchids that are found growing in Madagascar are not found anywhere else on Earth, so it really is an exquisite place, which needs our protection, conservation, and support.

To learn more about Madagascar and the vital work in conservation and research that is being undertaken by the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC), a non-profit, non governmental organisation (NGO), please click here.  To read the Kew Madagascar Conservation Centre (KMCC) blog, please click here.

The BiOrbAir terrarium that I have used to plant up these rare orchids, was designed by Barry Reynolds and is available from BiOrb.  The orchid plants that are featured inside this terrarium were grown in cultivation and not taken from the wild.

My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.

The Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Planting List

  • Aerangis citrata
  • Aerangis fastuosa
  • Aerangis macrocentra
  • Aerangis modesta
  • Aerangis punctata
  • Aerangis sp.
  • Aeranthes arachnites
  • Angraecum didieri 

You can see the full planting list for this terrarium here, where you’ll find more details about each of these orchids, together with the details of all of the nurseries and suppliers where I purchased my orchids, mosses, and cork for this terrarium.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.

Miniature epiphytic orchids from Madagascar

Welcome to a photographic tour of the Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium!

My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.

Aerangis citrata

Aerangis citrata, as pictured on the 25th June 2017.

This Aerangis citrata specimen has been putting a lot of energy into producing its flower spike.  I first noticed this Aerangis citrata specimen’s flower spike at the start of May 2017.  Since then this Aerangis citrata specimen’s flower spike has naturally grown and developed, and as you can see in the photograph below, now that we’ve reached June 2017, the flower buds are clearly visible.

This Aerangis citrata specimen looks rather ragged and tatty, as many of the plant’s leaves are displaying brown marks and die back at their tips.

As you can see in the photographs that accompany this review, the leaves of my orchids could do with a clean!  So after I took these photographs on the 25th June 2017, I wiped over the leaves of all of these orchids with some kitchen paper which was moistened with rainwater.  I used a new, small piece of kitchen paper to clean each leaf, so as to avoid spreading any pest or disease around my plants.

When I introduced this Aerangis citrata specimen into this terrarium, I had concerns as to whether this orchid would receive more light than it would wish for.  I positioned this Aerangis citrata specimen at the very top of this terrarium’s planting in order to accommodate the orchid’s blooms, which are pendent and hang below; so due to my positioning, this plant is directly under the BiOrbAir terrarium’s LED lights.

A closer look at this Aerangis citrata specimen’s flower spike, as pictured on the 25th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Aerangis citrata flower buds, as pictured on the 30th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Aerangis citrata flower buds, as pictured on the 30th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis fastuosa

Aerangis fastuosa, pictured on the 25th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Since I introduced this Aerangis fastuosa specimen to this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium in April 2017, this delightful orchid has produced a beautiful new, shiny leaf, which you can see in the photographs above and below.  It’s always such a joy to see new leaves and roots developing!

I love Aerangis fastuosa!  I am already looking forward to this miniature orchid’s next flowering, even though it’s a long way off!  I am so lucky to be able to see this orchid grow.

Aerangis fastuosa, pictured on the 25th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis macrocentra

Aerangis macrocentra, as pictured on the 25th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I instaled both of these young Aerangis macrocentra specimens inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, along with the other orchids, in April 2017.

As you can see in the photographs I have taken, these two plants are both displaying a few black marks around the tips and margins of a couple of their leaves.  I don’t believe that these marks have increased in size since the plants have been under my care, but I will take care to monitor these young plants over the coming months.

Aerangis macrocentra, as pictured on the 25th June 2017, inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis modesta

Aerangis modesta, as pictured on the 25th June 2017.

During the four months that this Aerangis modesta specimen has been in my care, this orchid has produced a new leaf.  This specimen lost a couple of leaves very rapidly after I purchased the plant, so I am happy to see the beautiful new leaf that the plant has produced.

The black marks that this Aerangis modesta specimen is displaying are of concern to me, I will continue to monitor this orchid’s growth and development.

I am hoping that this Aerangis modesta specimen has began to adjust to its new growing conditions, inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis punctata

Aerangis punctata, pictured on the 25th June 2017.

I have yet to see any noticeable change or development of this Aerangis punctata specimen since I introduced this miniature orchid to this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium in April 2017.  Aerangis punctata is a slow growing, miniature orchid, so I do not anticipate seeing any change in the plant’s growth and development at this early stage.

I haven’t noticed a change in the plant’s demeanour.  I hope that this Aerangis punctata specimen will grow happily inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis sp.

The unknown Aerangis species, pictured on the 25th June 2017, inside the Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.

This unknown Aerangis species is producing new roots and leaves, this specimen is growing as well as I could expect, I am pleased to see this plant’s growth and improvement.

On the 28th June 2017, a reader suggested via Twitter, that this unknown Aerangis species was Aerangis fuscata.  This identification is in agreement with a another reader’s identification of this orchid back in January 2016.  I hope that this Aerangis will eventually flower, so that I can confirm this identification.

Aeranthes arachnites

Aeranthes arachnites, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.

This Aeranthes arachnites specimen has produced two flowering spikes.  The first Aeranthes arachnites flower opened on the 27th June 2017.  This Aeranthes arachnites specimen’s racemes just fit inside this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, which is lucky, as it is a real joy to see this Madagascan orchid in bloom.

Aeranthes arachnites, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
A closer look at this Aeranthes arachnites specimen’s flower bud, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
An Aeranthes arachnites flower bud, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
A closer look at the Aeranthes arachnites flower bud further up the flowering stem, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
A closer look at this Aeranthes arachnites specimen’s flower bud, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.

Aeranthes arachnites flowers

Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
A closer look at this Aeranthes arachnites specimen’s flower bud, as pictured on the 27th June 2017.
A closer look at this Aeranthes arachnites specimen’s flower bud, as pictured on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 27th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Aeranthes arachnites in flower on the 30th June 2017.

Angraecum didieri

Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.

This Angraecum didieri specimen has really started to establish itself within this Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium.  This orchid has produced six new leaves and a number of new roots since I introduced the plant to this terrarium in April 2017.  I have so enjoyed seeing this endearing orchid grow and develop, this Angraecum didieri specimen already holds a very special place in my heart.

Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.

This Angraecum didieri specimen produces very beautiful, rather etherial looking roots.

Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
Angraecum didieri, as pictured inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 25th June 2017.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.
My Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th June 2017. Inside this terrarium Aeranthes arachnites is in flower, and Aerangis citrata is in bud.

Continue straight to the next update for this terrarium and and see how these orchids from Madagascar are growing, by clicking here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read about how my orchidarium was constructed, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

To read about the great new features of the 2017 BiOrbAir terrarium, please click here.

To read a Planting List of a wide range and variety of beautiful plants which are suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To see a Planting List of beautiful, miniature orchids, suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To read about the Writhlington Orchid Project, please click here.

To read about the Queen of Orchids, Grammatophyllum speciosum, and this plant’s flowering at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in September 2015, please click here.

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