White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial (part four)

Welcome to the fourth part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial.

I decided to plant up this White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium in April 2017, after receiving many requests from readers asking about white flowered, miniature, epiphytic orchids.  I didn’t have a spare terrarium available to plant at the time, so I decided to empty, and then re-plant my long-term review BiOrbAir terrarium with a variety of species of white-flowering orchids, to showcase how beautiful a single colour planting scheme for terrariums, vivariums, orchidariums, or bottle gardens, can be.

The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated, terrarium, which was designed by Barry Reynolds, and is available from BiOrb.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium Planting List

    • Aerangis biloba
    • Aerangis mystacidii
    • Amesiella monticola
    • Angraecum distichum
    • Brachypeza semiteretifolia
    • Ceratochilus biglandulosus
    • Holcoglossum flavescens
    • Humata repens
    • Masdevallia tovarensis
    • Neofinetia falcata
    • Phalaenopsis gibbosa
    • Phalaenopsis micholitzii
    • Podangis dactyloceras 

Since I set up this terrarium in April 2017, I have made a couple of new introductions to this terrarium: on the 28th May 2017, I added a young Aerangis mystacidii specimen, which had been previously growing inside a flask, and at the same time I added an attractive fern, Humata repens, which was previously growing inside another of my terrariums to this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

You can see the full planting list for this terrarium here, where you’ll find more details about each of these orchids, together with the details of all of the nurseries and suppliers where I purchased my orchids, mosses, and cork for this terrarium.

For more information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

White flowered miniature epiphytic orchids

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.
My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.
My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.
My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

Aerangis biloba

Aerangis biloba, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

I am so happy that this Aerangis bilioba specimen has produced a new leaf!

This miniature orchid is losing another of its leaves, probably due to the change of conditions the plant experienced when I purchased the plant earlier this year and it was moved from one environment to another.

Aerangis biloba, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

Aerangis mystacidii

Aerangis mystacidii, pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I have two Aerangis mystacidii specimens growing inside this terrarium.  These young seedlings are establishing nicely inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis mystacidii, pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Amesiella monticola

Amesiella monticola, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I am a great fan of the Amesiella genus, so it won’t surprise you to hear that this Amesiella monticola specimen is another of my favourite orchids; although I do have a number of favourites!

This Amesiella monticola specimen has quickly established itself inside this White Orchid Trial Terrarium, the plant has produced a new leaf and a number of roots, which have burrowed into the cork, securing the plant firmly in place.

Angraecum distichum

Angraecum distichum, pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Angraecum distichum is another of my favourite miniature orchids, I just love everything about this plant!

I am unsure as yet as to how well this Angraecum distichum specimen is adjusting to this terrarium, I hope the plant will be happy here.

Brachypeza semiteretifolia

Brachypeza semiteretifolia, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

There are two Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimens growing inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, both appear to be growing well, one is in the earliest stages of producing a flower spike.  I spotted a tiny snail on one of the plants, which I removed after taking its photograph.

Brachypeza semiteretifolia, as pictured on the 22nd August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A teeny tiny snail resting on Brachypeza semiteretifolia, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.
Brachypeza semiteretifolia, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Ceratochilus biglandulosus

Ceratochilus biglandulosus, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

This Ceratochilus biglandulosus specimen has not succeeded inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, the plant has dropped two of its three stems over the past few months.  I believe the reason for the plant’s decline is that the plant has not been watered frequently enough, and when it has received water the plant has dried out too quickly.  This miniature orchid is very small in size.  I placed this plant in the upper level of this terrarium, which was very close to the BiOrbAir’s fan, so the plant dried out in less time that it would have liked.

It’s important to create good air circulation inside terrariums, to give your plants a healthy environment in which to grow.  It’s also important to remember that your plant’s position within your BiOrbAir terrarium will determine how quickly its roots will become dry, so you will need to increase or decrease your misting to find the optimum level for your plant’s favoured growing conditions.

I could have thoroughly soaked this Ceratochilus biglandulosus specimen in rainwater, then added some additional moss to cover the plant’s roots, to help to retain water around the roots, and left the orchid inside this terrarium, but this time I opted to move the plant to another of my terrariums which enjoys more frequent misting, so that I could be sure of its survival.

Holcoglossum flavescens

Holcoglossum flavescens, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

This Holcoglossum flavescens specimen seems to be adjusting to its new environment.  I hope it will grow well inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Humata repens

Humata repens, pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Humata repens is an absolutely charming little fern, it’s demure and understated, yet utterly beautiful.  This diminutive fern grows to only 8cm (3 inches) tall, so can be accommodated inside event the smallest of terrariums.

Masdevallia tovarensis

Masdevallia tovarensis, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

I am so glad that I was able to include this Masdevallia tovarensis specimen inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, it’s still early days of course, but so far this miniature orchid seems to be growing well inside this terrarium.  The plant has produced new leaves and roots.

Masdevallia tovarensis, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

Neofinetia falcata

Neofinetia falcata pictured in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Neofinetia falcata pictured in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Neofinetia falcata pictured in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Neofinetia falcata pictured in flower on the 30th June 2017.
Neofinetia falcata pictured in flower on the 30th June 2017.

This Neofinetia falcata specimen delighted us with its exquisite inflorescences, from the 2nd June 2017, until the beginning of July 2017.  How I enjoyed these Neofinetia falcata flowers and their exclusive scent.  Now that the flowers have faded, this Neofinetia falcata species has its own beauty, which I admire each time I see this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

As you can see in the photographs below, this Neofinetia falcata specimen is in the process of losing a leaf.  The leaf has turned yellow, but it is currently still firmly attached to the plant; when the leaf dies and naturally comes away from the plant I shall remove it.  Orchids regularly loose leaves, this is a natural process and is not a cause for concern.

Neofinetia falcata, pictured inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 20th August 2017.
Neofinetia falcata, pictured inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 20th August 2017.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, pictured on the 8th August 2017, inside the White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, pictured on the 8th August 2017, inside the White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside the White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Well these photographs speak for themselves!  This Phalaenopsis gibbosa specimen has sent up a keiki in an attempt to propagate itself and stay alive.  This is another very small miniature orchid, I positioned this plant in the higher part of the terrarium, just under the fan, this was too dry an environment for this miniature orchid, so the plant has suffered.  I love this Phalaenopsis gibbosa specimen, I hope it will survive.

I have moved this Phalaenopsis gibbosa specimen into another of my terrariums, where it will receive more water.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside the White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii

Phalaenopsis micholitzii flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th June 2017.
Phalaenopsis micholitzii flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th June 2017.

Although it fits beautifully inside the BiOrbAir, Phalaenopsis micholitzii is quite a large orchid for a terrarium, and consequently  would not suit every type of terrarium.  I feel so lucky to have been able to include this orchid inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as the plant really adds a wow factor to this terrarium.  Phalaenopsis micholitzii is a beautiful plant even when it’s not flowering, as its shape is very pleasing.  The orchid’s leaves have an attractive shine and handsome finish.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii is such a floriferous orchid, it’s nearly always in bloom.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Phalaenopsis micholitzii, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Phalaenopsis micholitzii, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

This Phalaenopsis micholitzii specimen has produced these beautiful new roots, which you can see pictured above, and these exciting flower buds, which you can see in the photograph below.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii, as pictured on the 20th August 2017, inside my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Podangis dactyloceras

Podangis dactyloceras, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

This Podangis dactyloceras specimen has such a charm and charisma about it, I hope that this special fan shaped orchid which, produces the most fascinating translucent flowers, will flourish inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAIr Terrarium.

Podangis dactyloceras, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.
My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

Other articles that may interest you…………

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

To read about the great new features of the 2017 BiOrbAir terrarium, please click here.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

To read a Planting List of a wide range and variety of beautiful plants which are suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To see a Planting List of beautiful, miniature orchids, suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To read about the Writhlington Orchid Project, please click here.

To read about the Queen of Orchids, Grammatophyllum speciosum, and this plant’s flowering at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in September 2015, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

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