Sowing Sweet Peas

I love Sweet Peas.  Every year I look forward to being charmed by the Sweet Pea’s beautiful flowers and romanced by their heavenly fragrance.  Sweet Peas are certainly an annual that I recommend you try growing.  Sweet Peas, which are also known by their botanical name of Lathyrus odoratus, are very versatile, here in the UK, you can sow their seeds from September right through until April.  So there’s absolutely no reason not to try growing this pretty annual, you have plenty of time!

Eight months is of course plenty of time to sow your Sweet Pea seeds, or even to buy plants from your local nursery if you prefer, but if you’re looking to sow Sweet Pea seeds and have ever wondered what difference the month you choose to sow your seeds in will make, or if you’ve wondered if there’s a best time to sow your Sweet Pea seeds, I hope that this article with the results of my 2015 Sweet Pea Trial, will help you.

Sweet Pea Trial

For my trial I decided to sow the same varieties of Sweet Pea seeds, all of which were purchased from the same company, and grown in the same conditions, the seeds were sown at the same time every month, from September 2014 through until March 2015.  This allowed me to compare the number of flowers, the length of the stem produced, and evaluate if there was a better time of year to sow Sweet Peas for a greater harvest of flowers, or for a longer length of stem.

Sweet Pea cultivars

I purchased all of the Sweet Pea seeds I sowed for this trial from Roger Parson’s Sweet Peas, the varieties I chose are:

  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Frances Kate’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Gwendoline’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Judith Wilkinson’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Just Julia’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Susan Burgess’
Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey' is a maroon/violet bicolour flaked on white ground.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey’ is a maroon/violet bicolour flaked on white ground.

Sweet Pea ‘Frances Kate' also known as Lathyrus odoratus 'Frances Kate', a pretty Sweet Pea with a deep blue picotte edge. Deep blue stripe on white ground.

Sweet Pea ‘Frances Kate’ also known as Lathyrus odoratus ‘Frances Kate’, a pretty Sweet Pea with a deep blue picotte edge. Deep blue stripe on white ground.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Gwendoline'. Deep rose pink on a white ground. This is a very popular Sweet Pea.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Gwendoline’. Deep rose pink on a white ground. This is a very popular Sweet Pea.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Judith Wilkinson'. A deep carmine pink flower which adds a vibrancy to the garden and to a posy of flowers.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Judith Wilkinson’. A deep carmine pink flower which adds a vibrancy to the garden and to a posy of flowers.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Just Julia', a mid-blue Sweet Pea with large flowers.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Just Julia’, a mid-blue Sweet Pea with large flowers.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth', a very pretty, pale blue Sweet Pea.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’, a very pretty, pale blue Sweet Pea.

Lathyrus odoratus 'Pip's Cornish Cream', a beautiful cream Sweet Pea.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’, a beautiful cream Sweet Pea.

Lathyrus odoratus ’Susan Burgess', a deep blush pink variety, whose flowers enrich to salmon pink if grown under glass. I enjoyed growing this Sweet Pea and found that the weather and temperature affected the colour of the flowers with some paler and others a more vibrant shade of the same blush pink.

Lathyrus odoratus ’Susan Burgess’, a deep blush pink variety, whose flowers enrich to salmon pink if grown under glass. I enjoyed growing this Sweet Pea and found that the weather and temperature affected the colour of the flowers with some paler and others a more vibrant shade of the same blush pink.

Rootrainers

I started my Sweet Pea trial on Friday 26th September 2014, using one pack of Deep Rootrainers, I sowed the eight different varieties of Spencer type Sweet Peas mentioned above.  All of the Sweet Pea seeds were steeped in liquid paraffin for a few moments to deter mice, prior to sowing in Deep Rootrainers, which were filled with New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi-Purpose Compost.  The tray of Rootrainers was then placed onto the top shelf of a Rootrainers Racking Station, which had triple consecutive strips of copper tape wrapped around its legs for slug protection.  The racking system was positioned outside, the Sweet Pea seedlings received no protection whatsoever over the winter months.

Sweet Pea seedlings sown on 26th October 2014, pictured on 16th November 2014. I sowed all of my Sweet Peas for this trial in Rootrainers, using New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi Purpose Compost.

Sweet Pea seedlings sown on 26th October 2014, pictured on 16th November 2014. I sowed all of my Sweet Peas for this trial in Rootrainers, using New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi Purpose Compost.

I sowed four seeds of each of the aforementioned varieties, into each row of Rootrainers, and labelled each of the Rootrainers compartments with the date of sowing and the variety name.  I intended to be able to monitor the conditions and water my Sweet Pea seedlings when they required it, but the reality was that the seedlings didn’t always receive water when they should have done, and were consequently grown in quite harsh conditions, with all of the plants experiencing repeated periods of drought.  The seedlings did all experience the same equally harsh conditions though!  

I also intended to be able to feed my Sweet Pea plants more often than I was able to in reality, again the plants all received the same amount of fertiliser, and were all grown in the same growing media.

I sowed another tray of Rootrainers next month and every month from September 2014 until March 2015.  

Sweet Pea Sowing Dates

My sowing dates were as follows:

  • 26th September 2014
  • 26th October 2014
  • 26th November 2014
  • 26th December 2014
  • 26th January 2015
  • 26th February 2015
  • 26th March 2015
Sweet Pea seedlings. I sowed all of my Sweet Peas for this trial in Rootrainers, using New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi Purpose Compost.

Sweet Pea seedlings. I sowed all of my Sweet Peas for this trial in Rootrainers, using New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi Purpose Compost.

Sweet Pea Wigwams

The Sweet Pea plants in this trial were all planted out at the same time, and were grown in a rather wild, natural way – none of the Sweet Pea plants had any of their tendrils removed, and none of the plants were tied to their supports.  The Sweet Pea plants were grown up a series of home-made wigwams.  All of the Sweet Pea plants were self supporting and required no further tying in or support.

This is Sweet Pea 'Gwendoline' as seen growing in my Sweet Pea Trial. My Sweet Pea plants were all grown naturally, I didn't remove any of the Sweet Pea tendrils, as a grower using the cordon method for growing Sweet Peas would do. All of the Sweet Pea plants were self supporting, using their tendrils to attach themselves naturally to the twiggy wig wams with no additional tying in or support provided.

This is Sweet Pea ‘Gwendoline’ as seen growing in my Sweet Pea Trial. My Sweet Pea plants were all grown naturally, I didn’t remove any of the Sweet Pea tendrils, as a grower using the cordon method for growing Sweet Peas would do. All of the Sweet Pea plants were self supporting, using their tendrils to attach themselves naturally to the twiggy wigwams with no additional tying in or support provided.

Sweet Pea tendrils as seen in my Sweet Pea Trial on the 9th June 2015. Growers wishing to achieve the best Sweet Pea flowers regularly remove these tendrils and provide support, tying in their plants at regular, frequent intervals.

Sweet Pea tendrils seen in my Sweet Pea Trial on the 9th June 2015. Growers wishing to achieve the best Sweet Pea flowers regularly remove these tendrils and provide support, tying in their plants at regular, frequent intervals, this is known as the cordon method.

Sweet Pea tendrils are very efficient at supporting the plants. I have found there to be no need to tie my plants to the wig wams or supports as the sweet pea tendrils are so efficient.

Sweet Pea tendrils are very efficient at supporting the plants. I have found there to be no need to tie my plants to the wigwams or supports as the sweet pea tendrils are so efficient.

My Sweet Pea plants were planted around my home-made wig wams, I then left my Sweet Pea plants to attach themselves to their supports, every now and then the plants would receive a gentle shove in the right direction, but other than that they have been entirely self supporting, with no ties holding them into place. Sweet Pea tendrils have a charm all of their own, securing the plants in place rather beautifully.

My Sweet Pea plants were planted around my home-made wigwams, I then left my Sweet Pea plants to attach themselves to their supports, every now and then the plants would receive a gentle shove in the right direction, but other than that they have been entirely self supporting, with no ties holding them into place. Sweet Pea tendrils have a charm all of their own, securing the plants in place rather beautifully.

Some Sweet Pea tendrils form beautiful, intricate shapes.

Some Sweet Pea tendrils form beautiful, intricate shapes.

Sweet Pea Pests

I didn’t apply any preventative sprays or deterrents for pests, and I didn’t spray my plants at all, even when pests arrived.

Aphids

As you can see in the photograph below, my Sweet Pea plants suffered from infestations of aphids, also known as greenfly.  Aphids are a commonly found, sap sucking insect that feed on the sap of the Sweet Peas (and many other plants!), feeding through the Sweet Pea plant’s leaves, stems and flowers.  The resulting damage and nutrient loss weakens plants, resulting in distortion and stunted growth.

Sweet Pea plants are prone to suffer with viruses, aphids are virus vectors – they can transmit viral diseases from one plant to another, quickly infecting plants and spreading disease.  Aphids are a consequently a serious pest of Sweet Peas and cause significant damage.  As aphids feed on the sap from plants, they excrete honeydew, a sugary sticky substance on which dark, sooty moulds quickly form, hampering the plant’s ability to photosynthesise.

Aphids on the underside of the Sweet Pea leaves.

Aphids on the underside of the Sweet Pea leaves.

A colony of aphids on the Sweet Pea plants.

A colony of aphids feasting on the stems of my Sweet Pea plants. The white shapes you can see in this photograph are the cast skins of the aphids, which are shed as the insects increase in size. Sometimes these cast skins are mistaken for whitefly.

Beneficial Insects

With no preventative sprays my Sweet Pea plants relied on the protection of beneficial insects to control the aphid infestations – ladybirds, a natural predator of aphids, ladybird larvae who also feed on aphids, and hoverflies, whose larvae feed on aphids, were frequently seen on the plants, as were a variety of different garden birds, including long-tailed tits and blue tits.  These natural predators soon had the aphids under control.

The aphids were not noticeably more prevalent on any of the Sweet Pea plants, and neither were they absent on any of the plants.  The aphids were, as expected, very evenly, and efficiently spread throughout the plants, no matter as to the plant’s date of their sowing.

An Episyrphus balteatus, also known as a marmalade hoverfly, on Sweet Pea ‘Susan Burgess'.

An Episyrphus balteatus, also known as a marmalade hoverfly, on Sweet Pea ‘Susan Burgess’.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa. I photographed this particular hoverfly laying eggs on my Sweet Pea plants, as you can see in this photograph the plants are suffering with an infestation of aphids. Thankfully hoverfly larvae are predators of aphids and will soon control this outbreak.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa. This hoverfly is laying its eggs on my Sweet Pea plants.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa.

Episyrphus balteatus, commonly known as the marmalade hoverfly, is a well established species, found in widespread area across Europe, North Asia and North Africa.

A Ladybird on my Sweet Pea plants.

A Ladybird on my Sweet Pea plants.

Slugs and snails

A commonly found garden snail on my Sweet Pea wig wam.

A commonly found garden snail on my Sweet Pea wigwam.

Other than the copper tape, of which I used three strips of in succession for each leg of my Rootrainers Racking Station, I provided no other deterrents for slugs or snails.  I did see a number of snails and slugs during the course of the trial, but they caused very little noticeable damage to my plants.  I was happy to let these little creatures eat some of the leaves from my Sweet Pea plants and did not attempt to remove them.  No month of sowing provided any greater slug or snail protection than another, and all plants received the same amount of damage, i.e. very little.

Sweet Pea Trial 2015 Results

I picked my first Sweet Pea flower, Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’, on 28th May 2015.  I ended my trial on 25th September 2015, when I picked 8 Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’ flowers, 5 Lathyrus odoratus ‘Just Julia’ flowers, 5 Lathyrus odoratus ‘Gwendoline’ flowers, 9 Lathyrus odoratus ‘Susan Burgess’ flowers, and 4 Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey’ flowers.  The Sweet Pea flowers were picked, recorded and their stem lengths measured once each day for the duration of the trial.  I stopped collecting data for my trial on 25th September 2015, although I should mention that some of my Sweet Pea plants are continuing to flower now, at the beginning of October 2015.

Some interesting facts and figures from the trial:

  • During the course of my trial 3,155 Sweet Pea flowers were picked.
  • The most productive day during the trial was on the 10th July 2015, when 88 Sweet Pea flowers were harvested, with an average stem length of 19.8cm.
  • The longest length of a Sweet Pea flower stem recorded in my trial was 47cm, this was measured on a Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’ flower, which was picked on the 24th June 2015.
  • The Sweet Pea plant that produced the longest stem was sown in September 2014.

I’ve produced some charts which show various breakdowns of the data I collected during the trial.

Numbers of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day

This chart shows the total number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day that were picked over the period of the trial.

This chart shows the total number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day that were picked over the period of the trial.

This chart shows the number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day throughout the trial. Each colour represents a different variety.

This chart shows the number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day throughout the trial. Each colour represents a different variety.

This chart shows the number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day throughout the trial. Each colour represents a different month in which the seeds were sown.

This chart shows the number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested per day throughout the trial. Each colour represents a different month in which the seeds were sown.

Total number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested 

 

This chart shows the number of flowers of each variety of Sweet Pea, that were picked throughout the trial. The different colour blocks indicate the breakdown of the sowing months. Lathyrus odoratus 'Pip's Cornish Cream' and Lathyrus odoratus 'Earl Grey' were the clear leaders in terms of the number of flowers harvested throughout this trial.

This chart shows the number of flowers of each variety of Sweet Pea, that were picked throughout the trial. The different colour blocks indicate the breakdown of the sowing months. Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’ and Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey’ were the clear leaders in terms of the number of flowers harvested throughout this trial.

Number of Sweet Pea flowers harvested for each month’s sowing time

This chart shows the number of flowers for each month's sowing time. Clearly, October gives a significantly better yield than the other months. The colour blocks indicate the breakdown of varieties within each month; for October, you can see that the blocks are evenly spaced - showing that all varieties performed well for that month's sowing - whereas only Lathyrus odoratus 'Pip's Cornish Cream' performed well for November's sowing; all other varieties produced few flowers. Note, however, that this chart is not adjusted for the number of surviving seedlings; see the other charts for the adjusted numbers.

This chart shows the number of flowers for each month’s sowing time. Clearly, October gives a significantly better yield than the other months. The colour blocks indicate the breakdown of varieties within each month; for October, you can see that the blocks are evenly spaced – showing that all varieties performed well for that month’s sowing – whereas only Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’ performed well for November’s sowing; all other varieties produced few flowers. Note, however, that this chart is not adjusted for the number of surviving seedlings; see the other charts for the adjusted numbers.

This chart shows the number of flowers for each variety – but it has been adjusted to normalise the results for seedling survival rates at planting time. This removes the effect of where one month’s sowing of (say) Lathyrus odoratus ‘Gwendoline’ resulted in only two seedlings, compared to Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey’ which produced four seedlings – immediately the latter has a head-start. Once the adjustment has been applied, it’s a close run between Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’ and Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’ for the most Sweet Pea flowers produced during the 2015 Sweet Pea Trial.

This chart shows the number of flowers for each month's sowing time - but it has been adjusted to normalise the results for germination and seedling survival rates. This removes the effect of where more seedlings were lost or didn't germinate in January, which immediately puts this month at a disadvantage. With the adjustment applied, January just pips October to the lead (the unadjusted numbers showed October miles out in front). This demonstrates that if you can get all your seedlings through the winter and into the ground, January, October and March are the months to sow. Of course, in the unadjusted chart, January was much further down the chart, indicating that this time is at greater risk of losing more seedlings or has a lower rate of germination success, but the seedlings that germinated and survived will flower well. Lastly, it's useful to note that adjusted or unadjusted, November always comes out with the least number of flowers - so is clearly the worst month to sow your Sweet Pea seeds!

This chart shows the number of flowers for each month’s sowing time – but it has been adjusted to normalise the results for germination and seedling survival rates. This removes the effect of where more seedlings were lost or didn’t germinate in January, which immediately puts this month at a disadvantage. With the adjustment applied, January just pips October to the lead (the unadjusted numbers showed October miles out in front). This demonstrates that if you can get all your seedlings through the winter and into the ground, January, October and March are the months to sow. Of course, in the unadjusted chart, January was much further down the chart, indicating that this time is at greater risk of losing more seedlings or has a lower rate of germination success, but the seedlings that germinated and survived will flower well. Lastly, it’s useful to note that adjusted or unadjusted, November always comes out with the least number of flowers – so is clearly the worst month to sow your Sweet Pea seeds!

Sweet Pea flowering stem lengths by variety

This chart shows the average stem length for each variety of Sweet Pea in my trial. There's a wide range of stem lengths - 19cm to 21cm - but Lathyrus odoratus 'Pip's Cornish Cream' and Lathyrus odoratus 'Susan Burgess' are clearly the winners with the longest stems of the varieties featured in my trial.

This chart shows the average stem length for each variety of Sweet Pea in my trial. There’s a wide range of stem lengths – 19cm to 21cm – but Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’ and Lathyrus odoratus ‘Susan Burgess’ are clearly the winners with the longest stems of the varieties featured in my trial.

Sweet Pea flowering stem lengths by sowing month

This chart shows the average stem length for each sowing month. Interestingly, despite October producing the most flowers, the average stem length was shorter. This is likely to be due to the longer flowering period for October plants - stem lengths tail off throughout the season, so the more flowers you get for one month, the shorter they might be. January, on the other hand, had much fewer flowers as they died out more quickly - but those flowers that did bloom had longer stems.

This chart shows the average stem length for each sowing month. Interestingly, despite October producing the most flowers, the average stem length was shorter. This is likely to be due to the longer flowering period for October plants – stem lengths tail off throughout the season, so the more flowers you get for one month, the shorter they might be. January, on the other hand, had much fewer flowers as they died out more quickly – but those flowers that did bloom had longer stems.

Sweet Pea flowering stem lengths and temperature

This chart shows the average stem length of the Sweet Pea flowers and the maximum temperature on each day. There appears to be a slight correlation between the stem length and temperature, which could imply that warmer weather results in longer stems for Sweet Pea flowers.

This chart shows the average stem length of the Sweet Pea flowers and the maximum temperature on each day. There appears to be a slight correlation between the stem length and temperature, which could imply that warmer weather results in longer stems for Sweet Pea flowers.

Sweet Pea Trial Conclusions

Before making any assertions about the data, it’s important to note that the data volume in this trial is not huge, so some of the apparent conclusions may not be statistically significant. However, we can certainly draw some conclusions on the basis of the data in this small trial:

  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’ and Lathyrus odoratus ‘Pip’s Cornish Cream’ were the most prolific flowering varieties in this trial.
  • Lathyrus odoratus ‘Just Julia’ produced the least number of flowers in this trial.
  • The best month to sow sweet peas, to get the most flowers, is October.
  • The worst month to sow sweet peas – when looking for the maximum number of flowers – is November.
  • If you are looking for flowers with the longest stems, October is the worst month to sow, and instead you should sow in mid-winter – January or February.
  • The day-to-day weather appears to affect the stem length of flowers, giving longer stems when the temperature is warmer.
  • With a planned schedule of succession sowing, it’s possible to pick a large bouquet of sweet peas, every day, from early June until October!
A vase of Sweet Peas collected during my 2015 Sweet Pea Trial.

A vase of Sweet Peas collected during my 2015 Sweet Pea Trial.

A Sweet Pea seed pod, you can see the seeds developing inside. In order to receive the most flowers from your Sweet Pea plants you need to pick often and be thorough in your picking, don't leave any old flowers as once the plants start producing seed they don't produce as many flowers.

A Sweet Pea seed pod, you can see the seeds developing inside. In order to receive the most flowers from your Sweet Pea plants you need to pick often and be thorough in your picking, don’t leave any old flowers on your plants, as once the flowers fade and the plants start producing seed they don’t produce as many flowers .

Lathyrus odoratus 'Naomi Nazareth', as pictured on the 22nd September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Naomi Nazareth’, as pictured on the 22nd September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus 'Earl Grey'. Photograph taken on 25th September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Earl Grey’. Photograph taken on 25th September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus 'Susan Burgess'. Photograph taken on 25th September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Susan Burgess’. Photograph taken on 25th September 2015.

Sweet Peas yet to open. Photograph taken on 25th September 2015.

Sweet Peas yet to open. Photograph taken on 25th September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus 'Just Julia', photograph taken on the 26th September 2015.

Lathyrus odoratus ‘Just Julia’, photograph taken on the 26th September 2015.

Photograph taken on the 17th September 2015, many of the Sweet Pea plants have now died back.

Photograph taken on the 17th September 2015, many of the Sweet Pea plants have now died back.

A collage of some of the Sweet Pea photographs taken during my 2014/2015 Sweet Pea Trial.

A collage of some of the Sweet Pea photographs taken during my 2014/2015 Sweet Pea Trial.

A composite image made up of 50 Sweet Pea photographs combined!

A composite image made up of 50 Sweet Pea photographs combined!

I’ll be starting my next Sweet Pea Trial soon, I will be using Rootrainers again to sow my seeds, and I will again be using seed purchased from Roger Parson’s Sweet Peas.  This time however, after seeing some great results during my Peat Free Compost Trials this year, I will be using the Wool Potting Compost from Dalefoot Composts, a wonderful peat free potting compost made from composted bracken and sheep’s wool, which provides excellent water retention and slow release nitrogen.  I’ll let you know how I get on next year, I am already looking forward to my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial!

Further Trials

Sweet Pea Trials

To read the results of my 2017 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

Compost Trials

To see all of my Compost Trials, please click here.

To read advice on planting up containers, please click here.

Scented Daffodil Trials

To read the results of my 2018 Scented Daffodil Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2018 Scented Daffodil Container Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2017 Scented Daffodil Trial, please click here.

Terrarium, Vivarium, and Orchidarium Trials

To see how my Orchidarium was created, please click here.

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

To read how I track the temperature, humidity, and light conditions inside my terrariums, please click here.

Other articles and links that may interest you……….

 To read about the Queen of Orchids, the largest Orchid species in the world, which flowered at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, please click here

To read about terrariums and bottle gardens, please click here.

To read about the 20 shortlisted plants, including the finalists and winner of the RHS Chelsea Flower Show Plant Of The Year 2015, a special competition to find the most innovative new plant launched at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, please click here.

To read about the new lives of some of the Show Gardens from the 2015 RHS Chelsea Flower Show, please click here.

To read about some of the Gold Medal winning nurseries at the 2015 RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show, please click here.

To read about growing mushrooms indoors, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

One thought on “Sowing Sweet Peas

  1. Joan Speight

    November 17, 2016 at 3:22pm

    Have you tried Sweetpea Hannah Magovern? Very long stems, deep colour and very strong perfume.

    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      November 17, 2016 at 5:55pm

      Hello Joan, I haven’t grown this Sweet Pea cultivar, it sounds lovely though! Thank you for telling me about it. Are you growing Sweet Pea ‘Hannah Magovern’?

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