BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir (part three)

Welcome to the third part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir.  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from Reef One.  If you would like to start at the very beginning, and read the first part of this trial and review, please click here, to read the second part of this trial and review, please click here.

For this trial and review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir, I have chosen a variety of different miniature orchids, originating from different climates and countries, to trial growing inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.  Throughout this trial I will identify miniature orchid species that will grow well inside the constant conditions provided by the BiOrbAir terrarium.  I hope this trial will help you if you’re interested in growing miniature orchids, or planting your own indoor terrarium garden.

You can see the full planting list of all the plants that I have trialled growing inside this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, featured in this review here, where you’ll also find the details of the nurseries and companies I used to purchase the miniature orchids, moss, and cork, for this terrarium.

Peat free coir compost

I used the peat-free, coir compost that was included with my BiOrbAir terrarium as the growing media for this terrarium.  I followed the straight-forward instructions to pre-soak the compost before adding it to the terrarium, when I planted it eight months ago.  I didn’t add any other growing media or fertiliser, I used only the coir compost provided with the BiOrbAir.

Fertilisers

In the six months since planting I haven’t used any fertilisers on either the moss or the coir compost inside this terrarium, the moss has been watered only with rainwater.  The moss is still looking in optimum condition, it’s a beautiful verdant green and provides the perfect backdrop for the miniature orchids.  So far, in the eight months since planting, I haven’t replaced any of the moss from this terrarium.  Any fertilisers I use, as well as the care and maintenance of both the plants and the BiOrbAir terrarium that I undertake, I will detail here in my review – I hope this will help you if you’re looking to start a terrarium or if you’re interested in growing miniature orchids.

Irrigation

Naturally, I will regularly top up the base reservoir of my BiOrbAir with rain water as required.  The water in the base reservoir will be absorbed by the capillary matting, which is fitted to the support tray above the base reservoir, which in turn will moisten the compost above.  The absorption of water through the capillary matting will keep the coir compost moist, and as a result, the moss will be watered automatically.

I will regularly top up the ultrasonic misting unit with Humidimist, a pure bottled water, low in electrolytes, available from Reef One, and included as part of the package when you purchase a BiOrbAir.  The Humidimist is the only type of water recommended for use in the ultrasonic misting unit of the BiOrbAir, and it is the only product I will use.

Epiphytic Miniature Orchids

All of the orchids that I have chosen for this trial are epiphytic – epiphytic plants grow naturally on other plants, often trees.  The trees or plants that the epiphytic orchids grow on, provide height, support and a place for the orchid to grow.  These epiphytic orchids are not the same as parasitic plants like mistletoe, they don’t take any sustenance from their host plant.  Epiphytic orchids don’t usually cause any harm to the host plant they are growing on, they simply use another plant as a support to raise them up, which allows the epiphytic orchid to gain a better position, and often to receive more light and better air circulation than it would otherwise.  Epiphytic orchids take all their water and nutrients from the air, the rain, and any accumulated debris that has collected in the branches of their host tree.  All of the miniature epiphytic orchids featured in this trial have been mounted on cork bark.

Cork for terrariums

Cork is such an amazing and interesting, fascinating natural material, obtained from the bark of Quercus suber, (commonly known as the Cork Oak) cork has many uses.  The cork industry is regarded as sustainable, as the Quercus suber trees are not required to be cut down to harvest the bark, and harvesting the bark does not harm the tree – the Quercus suber trees continue to grow after their bark is harvested, and their bark also re-grows – the trees go on provide future harvests at regular intervals every 9 years or so.

Misting the orchids

I mist my miniature orchids when I think they would benefit from some additional moisture.  I have been feeding my miniature orchids, I have used Orchid Focus Grow and Orchid Focus Bloom, I purchased both of these fertilisers from the shop at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.  I feed my orchids only sparingly, following the instructions on the pack.  These miniature orchids wouldn’t naturally receive an abundance of nutrients in their natural environment.  Over feeding can be very detrimental to your orchid plants.

New Miniature Orchids!

I recently visited The RHS London Orchid Show, where I purchased a number of new, interesting orchids, three of which I have now included in this trial.  Following the re-organisation of this terrarium on the 9th April 2016, I now have the following orchids growing inside this terrarium:

  • Aerangis fastuosa*
  • Angraecum equitans
  • Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’
  • Diplocaulobium abbreviatum
  • Domingoa purpurea
  • Dryadella simula
  • Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’
  • Masdevallia decumana
  • Masdevallia rechingeriana

Five of these miniature orchids were included in my original planting of this terrarium eight months ago, I then added the Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ specimen in January 2016.  As you’ll see from the list of plants above, I have only one Aerangis plant left growing inside this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium – sadly my Aerangis punctata died, and was removed from this terrarium in December 2015.  So far this is the only orchid to have been removed from this terrarium.

* I received a question from a reader a couple of months, who asked if my Aerangis fastuosa, might in fact be an Aerangis fuscata, a rarer miniature orchid species, which is also from Madagascar.  When this miniature orchid arrived in the post, I had a question mark in my mind as to whether I had been sent the orchid I requested when I placed my order.  I referred to a number of library books on orchids and searched online for photographs of different Aerangis cultivars.  Currently I cannot say with any certainty which variety of Aerangis I have received – I have shown photographs of this orchid to a number of orchid experts from around the world, so far no one has been able to identify the specimen.  The best and easiest way to identify this orchid will be if it flowers.  I say ‘if’, as this Aerangis doesn’t look as healthy or happy as I would like.  As you’ll see in my photographs in a moment, I have now re-mounted this orchid to see if it would be happier growing in a different orientation.  I will continue to refer to this orchid as Aerangis fastuosa, but I hope to make a definite identification, if and when the orchid flowers.

The following plants were purchased at The RHS London Orchid Show in April 2016 from Akerne Orchids and were added to this terrarium and trial on the 9th April 2016:

  • Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’
  • Dryadella simula
  • Masdevallia rechingeriana

You can see the full planting list for this terrarium here, where you’ll find the full details of where I have purchased all of my miniature orchids, moss and the cork I have used inside this terrarium.

Firstly, a recap, here’s a picture of my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, this photograph was taken in August 2015 – the same month that this terrarium was originally planted and set up:

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on 26th August 2015.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on 26th August 2015.

Here’s my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, pictured on the 9th April 2016, after some re-organisation and the inclusion of three new miniature orchids:

Pictured on the 9th April 2016, my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, has been re-organised. The following miniature orchids have been now been included - Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor', Dryadella simula, and Masdevallia rechingeriana. These miniature orchids have now been added to my trial.

Pictured on the 9th April 2016, my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, has been re-organised. The following miniature orchids have been now been included – Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’, Dryadella simula, and Masdevallia rechingeriana. These miniature orchids have now been added to my trial.

When this terrarium was originally planted, I chose to mount the miniature orchids onto the cork using fishing line to secure the orchids in place.  I was thinking purely aesthetically when I chose to use fishing line to secure the orchids – as it’s clear material, and so not as visible – I felt it wouldn’t detract from the beauty of the orchids.  I did have real concerns that the fishing line could act as a cheese wire, and slice into the roots of the orchids, but I went ahead and used it regardless – all of the orchids were mounted onto the cork bark and secured in place with the fishing line.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016, after some re-organisation and the addition of some new miniature orchids. I have removed the fishing line that used to hold the orchids in place, and where necessary, I have used strips cut from stockings to secure the miniature orchids in place. The strips of stockings aren't as aesthetically pleasing - they are rather strikingly visible, but the soft, elasticated nature of the stockings makes them a far more gentle option to use to secure the orchids in place, than the fishing line I used previously.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016, after some re-organisation and the addition of some new miniature orchids. I have removed the fishing line that used to hold the orchids in place, and where necessary, I have used strips cut from stockings to secure the miniature orchids in place. The strips of stockings aren’t as aesthetically pleasing – they are rather strikingly visible, but the soft, elasticated nature of the stockings makes them a far more gentle option to use to secure the orchids in place, than the fishing line I used previously.

Changing the way I mount my orchids

During a recent visit to the The Botanic Gardens at Kew, I was talking to the orchid experts in the tropical nurseries and found out that Kew use strips of material cut from stockings, to secure all their epiphytic orchids.  Although I haven’t noticed any problems from using the fishing line to secure the orchids so far, I have now taken the decision to remove the fishing line securing all of my epiphytic orchids.  Many of these miniature orchids had secured themselves in place onto the cork they were mounted on, their roots holding the plant firmly in place, but where necessary, I re-mounted any of my orchids, using small strips of material, cut from stockings, to secure the orchids in place.

For many years now I have used stockings as ties for trees and other garden plants with great success.  I haven’t previously used stockings to secure epiphytic orchids, just purely for aesthetic reasons – the strips of material from stockings are very visible when they are first used, and this does detract somewhat from the beauty of the orchids when viewed as a display.  However, I am certain that securing the orchids using soft strips of stockings is better for the orchids, and that’s my priority.  With this method, there isn’t any risk of slicing through any of the orchid roots, as there was when using the fishing line.

Here's my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid has anchored itself so securely onto the cork bark, its roots have permeated the cork and it requires no further tying in.

Here’s my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid has anchored itself so securely onto the cork bark, its roots have permeated the cork and it requires no further tying in.

Angraecum equitans, pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 9th April 2016. This miniature orchid has secured itself in place on the cork bark, and after the fishing line was removed, needed no further tying in.

Angraecum equitans, pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 9th April 2016. This miniature orchid has secured itself in place on the cork bark, and after the fishing line was removed, needed no further tying in.

Pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium - Masdevallia decumana in full flower, the flowers of Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' just edge into the photograph on the right hand side and the flowers of Masdevallia rechingeriana can just be made out in the background.

Pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium – Masdevallia decumana in full flower, the flowers of Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ just edge into the photograph on the right hand side and the flowers of Masdevallia rechingeriana can just be made out in the background.

This Masdevallia decumana had one flower finish a few days ago, but it still has these two flowers in bloom. I cannot currently see any further new flowering stems. Pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 9th April 2016.

This Masdevallia decumana had one flower finish a few days ago, but it still has these two flowers in bloom. I cannot currently see any further new flowering stems. Pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 9th April 2016.

The Domingoa purpurea, Masdevallia decumana and Angraecum equitans specimens that are growing inside this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium had achieved excellent root growth – when I removed the fishing line I found, as I had expected, that they have all secured themselves to the cork bark with their roots, and required no further tying in.

Here is the first flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th April 2016. As you can see the flower bud still hasn't opened.

Here is the first flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th April 2016. As you can see the flower bud still hasn’t opened.

Here is the second flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th April 2016. As you can see, this flower spike isn't as advanced as the first.

Here is the second flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th April 2016. As you can see, this flower spike isn’t as advanced as the first.

The Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ specimen inside this terrarium, had not anchored its roots into the bark, as was also to be expected.  As this miniature orchid is resting on top of the cork bark, it’s positioned horizontally and has no risk of slipping off, I made the decision to leave this orchid resting on the same piece of cork bark without tying it in.

Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid is just resting on this piece of cork bark, there are no ties holding it in place and the orchid's roots have not penetrated into the bark.

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid is just resting on this piece of cork bark, there are no ties holding it in place and the orchid’s roots have not penetrated into the bark.

Re-organising the terrarium and re-positioning plants

I took this photograph of Aerangis fastuosa on the 9th April 2016, just before the fishing line, which previously secured the orchid in place vertically, was removed.

I took this photograph of Aerangis fastuosa on the 9th April 2016, just before the fishing line, which previously secured the orchid in place vertically, was removed.

When it came to removing the fishing line from the Aerangis fastuosa specimen, things were as I expected: this orchid plant had produced very little root growth and was not secured in any way whatsoever.  I decided to take advantage of this fact, and I have used the opportunity to re-mount the Aerangis fastuosa in a different fashion.  I opted to mount this orchid horizontally, as apposed to vertically.  I have secured the Aerangis fastuosa in place, on a piece of cork bark, using a strip of material cut from a stocking.

Here's my Aerangis fastuosa, as pictured on the 9th April 2016, after being removed from its previous position within this terrarium and remounted onto another piece of cork, this time in a horizontal position. As you can see the strips of stockings I have used to secure this orchid in place look unsightly, they are however, soft and elasticated and therefore a more gentle option to use to hold my epiphytic orchids in place.

Here’s my Aerangis fastuosa, as pictured on the 9th April 2016, after being removed from its previous position within this terrarium and remounted onto another piece of cork, this time in a horizontal position. As you can see the strips of stockings I have used to secure this orchid in place look unsightly, they are however, soft and elasticated and therefore a more gentle option to use to hold my epiphytic orchids in place.

Here's another photograph of my Aerangis fastuosa, taken on the 9th April 2016 after it had been re-mounted onto a new piece of horizontal cork bark, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s another photograph of my Aerangis fastuosa, taken on the 9th April 2016 after it had been re-mounted onto a new piece of horizontal cork bark, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I am thrilled to see a new leaf developing on this Aerangis fastuosa. I hope so very much that I can keep this orchid alive, well and happy inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir. Pictured on the 9th April 2016.

I am thrilled to see a new leaf developing on this Aerangis fastuosa. I hope so very much that I can keep this orchid alive, well and happy inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir. Pictured on the 9th April 2016.

The Diplocaulobium abbreviatum specimen had also not secured itself in any way, so again I took the opportunity to reposition and move this miniature orchid to a location with more direct light – previously this orchid was rather shaded, as the overhang of the piece of cork bark above it obstructed the BiOrbAir’s LED lights.  I am interested to see how well the Diplocaulobium abbreviatum will grow in its new position.

Here's the Diplocaulobium abbreviatum, pictured on the 9th April 2016, after it had been moved to a brighter position, where it will receive direct light, inside the Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s the Diplocaulobium abbreviatum, pictured on the 9th April 2016, after it had been moved to a brighter position, where it will receive direct light, inside the Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Miniature orchids with tiny flowers

Dryadella simula

The Dryadella simula plant is now occupying the shadiest position inside this terrarium, this is not as shady a position as that in which the Diplocaulobium previously resided.  I hope this Dryadella will be happy here.  As the Dryadella simula specimen is a new addition to this terrarium, I have secured it in place on the cork with a strip of material cut from a stocking.

Dryadella simula inflorescences, pictured with a British five pence piece to show the diminutive size of the inflorescences..

Dryadella simula inflorescences, pictured with a British five pence piece to show the diminutive size of the inflorescences..

A close up of Dryadella simula's tiny flowers. This miniature orchid's miniature flowers are produced close to the base of the plant.

A close up of Dryadella simula’s tiny flowers. This miniature orchid’s miniature flowers are produced close to the base of the plant.

This Dryadella simula has a number of flowers currently in bloom. I have noticed that the flowers have a rather earthy fragrance, you need to really move in close to sense the fragrance, which I don't like personally, but my cats find fascinating! Pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 9th April 2016.

This Dryadella simula has a number of flowers currently in bloom. I have noticed that the flowers have a rather earthy fragrance, you need to really move in close to sense the fragrance, which I don’t like personally, but my cats find fascinating! Pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 9th April 2016.

Miniature orchids with larger flowers

Masdevallia rechingeriana

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

The Masdevallia rechingeriana has ended up being in a lower position than I intended.  I will keep an eye on this miniature orchid, and review the situation and this orchid’s position in a few days time.  Again, this miniature orchid is a new addition to this terrarium, and has been secured in place using a strip of material, which was cut from a stocking.

Pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium - Masdevallia rechingeriana with its triquetrous inflorescence and just squeezing into the edge of the photograph, a Masdevallia decumana flower.

Pictured on the 9th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium – Masdevallia rechingeriana with its triquetrous inflorescence and just squeezing into the edge of the photograph, a Masdevallia decumana flower.

Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ flowers

Lastly the Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ has been positioned vertically, in direct view of the BiOrbAir’s LED lights.  Again the Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ is a new addition to this terrarium, this specimen has been secured in place, using a strip of material cut from a stocking.

Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' is a new addition to this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, originating from Africa, it has unusual yellow inflorescences. Pictured on the 9th April 2016.

Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ is a new addition to this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, originating from Africa, it has unusual yellow inflorescences. Pictured on the 9th April 2016.

Here's a close up of Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' and its flower spike. As pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on the 9th April 2016.

Here’s a close up of Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ and its flower spike. As pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium on the 9th April 2016.

Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor'.

Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation, and the addition of some new miniature orchids. Currently Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' and Dryadella simula are all in flower inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes, but the flowers are yet to open.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation, and the addition of some new miniature orchids. Currently Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ and Dryadella simula are all in flower inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes, but the flowers are yet to open.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation, and the addition of some new miniature orchids. Currently Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' and Dryadella simula are all in flower inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes, but the flowers are yet to open.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation, and the addition of some new miniature orchids. Currently Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ and Dryadella simula are all in flower inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes, but the flowers are yet to open.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation and the addition of some new miniature orchids. I have removed the fishing line that used to hold the orchids in place, and where necessary, I have used strips cut from stockings to secure the miniature orchids in place.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation and the addition of some new miniature orchids. I have removed the fishing line that used to hold the orchids in place, and where necessary, I have used strips cut from stockings to secure the miniature orchids in place.

A close up of the planting inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. In this photograph, taken on the 9th April 2016, you can see Masdevallia decumana and Masdevallia rechingeriana in flower. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes inside this terrarium, but the flowers are yet to open. Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' can be seen in the background, and Aerangis fastuosa in the foreground.

A close up of the planting inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. In this photograph, taken on the 9th April 2016, you can see Masdevallia decumana and Masdevallia rechingeriana in flower. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes inside this terrarium, but the flowers are yet to open. Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ can be seen in the background, and Aerangis fastuosa in the foreground.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation, and the addition of some new miniature orchids. Currently Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' and Dryadella simula are all in flower inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes, but the flowers are yet to open.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2016 after some re-organisation, and the addition of some new miniature orchids. Currently Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ and Dryadella simula are all in flower inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced flower spikes, but the flowers are yet to open.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 15th April 2016. Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor', Dryadella simula and Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' are all flowering inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced two flower spikes, but as yet no flowers have opened.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium as pictured on the 15th April 2016. Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’, Dryadella simula and Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ are all flowering inside this terrarium. Domingoa purpurea has produced two flower spikes, but as yet no flowers have opened.

Another view of my Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium. Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor', Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky', and Dryadella simula, are all flowering inside this terrarium.

Another view of my Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium. Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’, Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, and Dryadella simula, are all flowering inside this terrarium.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 15th April 2016.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 15th April 2016.

Masdevallia rechingeriana has such an elegant and beautiful flower. Pictured on the 15th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Masdevallia rechingeriana has such an elegant and beautiful flower. Pictured on the 15th April 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I have a number of miniature orchids flowering inside this terrarium. My Masdevallia decumana has been flowering for sometime; currently this specimen has just one flower blooming, which, as it has been flowering for while, I would expect the flower to finish in the next week or two.

I have a number of miniature orchids flowering inside this terrarium. My Masdevallia decumana has been flowering for sometime; currently this specimen has just one flower blooming, which, as it has been flowering for while, I would expect the flower to finish in the next week or two.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, pictured on the 15th April 2016.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, pictured on the 15th April 2016.

Flower Failure?

2nd May 2016

Here is the first flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 2nd May 2016. As you can see the flower bud still hasn't opened, and the flower bud has turned from pink to brown! I think this flower may have sadly died before it has even opened. I smiled to myself as I included this orchid in my original planting for this terrarium, I pictured the long flower spikes trying to do laps around the edge of the terrarium! This Domingoa purpurea was an orchid that I expected to use as an example of what not to include for a terrarium planting scheme, as it naturally has such long flower spikes which render it unsuitable for this type of planting. I have had concerns from the onset that the flowers would be blasted and wouldn't open or flower successfully. There is one flower spike, in an earlier stage of development produced by this same plant, but I don't hold out a huge amount of hope as to seeing its flowers open.

Here is the first flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 2nd May 2016. As you can see the flower bud still hasn’t opened, and the flower bud has turned from pink to brown! I think this flower may have sadly died before it has even opened. I smiled to myself as I included this orchid in my original planting for this terrarium, I pictured the long flower spikes trying to do laps around the edge of the terrarium! This Domingoa purpurea was an orchid that I expected to use as an example of what not to include for a terrarium planting scheme, as it naturally has such long flower spikes which render it unsuitable for this type of planting. I have had concerns from the onset that the flowers would be blasted and wouldn’t open or flower successfully. There is one flower spike, in an earlier stage of development produced by this same plant, but I don’t hold out a huge amount of hope as to seeing its flowers open.

New flower buds

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 6th May 2016. Inside this terrarium Dryadella simula, Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky are in full flower, and Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana and Domingoa purpurea are all in the early stages of producing flowers, with flower buds present on each plant.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 6th May 2016. Inside this terrarium Dryadella simula, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky are in full flower, and Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana and Domingoa purpurea are all in the early stages of producing flowers, with flower buds present on each plant.

Here's a closer look at my Miniature Orchids inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I took this photograph on the 6th May 2016; in this photograph, you might just be able to make out the two new flower buds on the Masdevallia decumana, and a new flower bud on the Masdevallia rechingeriana. My Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' has just finished flowering and my Angraecum equitans is yet to flower, in the background, my Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' has been flowering for a number of months and is still in flower.

Here’s a closer look at my Miniature Orchids inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I took this photograph on the 6th May 2016; in this photograph, you might just be able to make out the two new flower buds on the Masdevallia decumana, and a new flower bud on the Masdevallia rechingeriana. My Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ has just finished flowering and my Angraecum equitans is yet to flower, in the background, my Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ has been flowering for a number of months and is still in flower.

Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' has produced a number of flowering spikes, which are now very long and extended, with flowers still opening at the very tip of each spike. I focused on the Lepanthopsis's leaves and on the moss that has grown up around it, for this photograph, which I took on the 6th May 2016. This miniature orchid is a real delight and is very easy to grow. I find that this Lepanthopsis likes to be misted regularly, which I don't always do! I have noticed the orchid's growth speeds up when I have taken the time to mist it and it flowers more readily with the addition of regular misting and moisture.

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ has produced a number of flowering spikes, which are now very long and extended, with flowers still opening at the very tip of each spike. I focused on the Lepanthopsis’s leaves and on the moss that has grown up around it, for this photograph, which I took on the 6th May 2016. This miniature orchid is a real delight and is very easy to grow. I find that this Lepanthopsis likes to be misted regularly, which I don’t always do! I have noticed the orchid’s growth speeds up when I have taken the time to mist it and it flowers more readily with the addition of regular misting and moisture.

Dryadella simula

This Dryadella simula has produced an abundance of flowers. I counted 11 flowers on this miniature orchid, on the 6th May 2016, when I took this photograph.

This Dryadella simula has produced an abundance of flowers. I counted 11 flowers on this miniature orchid, on the 6th May 2016, when I took this photograph.

I am hoping that my Aerangis fastuosa, (I am far from certain that this miniature orchid is actually Aerangis fastuosa, but as I am unable to identify with any certainty which Aerangis it is, I am referring to this orchid as fastuosa, as this was the orchid I ordered, until I can confirm otherwise!) will continue growing well. I am so happy to see the beautiful new leaf the Aerangis has produced, I hope this miniature orchid will be happier now that I have re-mounted the orchid onto a new piece of cork, in a different position, and in a different location within my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I used more moss than I had planned to when mounting the orchid, but so far this plant seems happy enough - so I am not making any alterations at the moment - but I am keeping a close eye on this plant.

I am hoping that my Aerangis fastuosa, (I am far from certain that this miniature orchid is actually Aerangis fastuosa, but as I am unable to identify with any certainty which Aerangis it is, I am referring to this orchid as fastuosa, as this was the orchid I ordered, until I can confirm otherwise!) will continue growing well. I am so happy to see the beautiful new leaf the Aerangis has produced, I hope this miniature orchid will be happier now that I have re-mounted the orchid onto a new piece of cork, in a different position, and in a different location within my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I used more moss than I had planned to when mounting the orchid, but so far this plant seems happy enough – so I am not making any alterations at the moment – but I am keeping a close eye on this plant.

My Angraecum equitans is pictured here on the 6th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This orchid was damaged when it arrived in the post and had nearly all of its roots damaged and removed. I mounted this Angraecum onto this piece of cork bark back in August 2015, since then the Angraecum has produced a number of new, healthy roots, these new roots have secured the orchid onto the cork.

My Angraecum equitans is pictured here on the 6th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This orchid was damaged when it arrived in the post and had nearly all of its roots damaged and removed. I mounted this Angraecum onto this piece of cork bark back in August 2015, since then the Angraecum has produced a number of new, healthy roots, these new roots have secured the orchid onto the cork.

It's a bit blurry, but my Masdevallia decumana, pictured on the left of this photograph, has two new flower buds. My Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor', which is on the right hand side, has just finished flowering. Pictured on the 6th May 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

It’s a bit blurry, but my Masdevallia decumana, pictured on the left of this photograph, has two new flower buds. My Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’, which is on the right hand side, has just finished flowering. Pictured on the 6th May 2016 inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

9th May 2016

Terrarium Life

I think I spotted a centipede inside this terrarium this evening!  I didn’t see it in full, and I only saw it for a second, while the insect was moving quickly – so I cannot be a hundred percent sure, but it looked like a centipede.

Here is another update on the first flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th May 2016. As you can see the flower bud still hasn't opened, and the flower still looks to be brown and discoloured, there's not been any real changes since my last update.

Here is another update on the first flower spike that appeared on my Domingoa purpurea, as pictured on the 9th May 2016. As you can see the flower bud still hasn’t opened, and the flower still looks to be brown and discoloured, there’s not been any real changes since my last update.

Here's my Aerangis fastuosa, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s my Aerangis fastuosa, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Flower buds

Masdevallia rechingeriana

When I purchased this Masdevallia rechingeriana specimen it was already in flower. That initial flower has now faded, but this new bud has appeared since I purchased this miniature orchid on the 1st April 2016, from Akerne Orchids, at the RHS London Orchid Show.

When I purchased this Masdevallia rechingeriana specimen it was already in flower. That initial flower has now faded, but this new bud has appeared since I purchased this miniature orchid on the 1st April 2016, from Akerne Orchids, at the RHS London Orchid Show.

My Masdevallia decumana has continued to delight me with its almost continuous flowering display. This Masdevallia decumana has been in flower since since January 2016 - certainly there has always been a bud on the horizon since it started flowering, and as the buds are quick to develop, there isn't too long to wait for the new blooms to appear. There's always a new flower to look forward to at the moment, with this super miniature orchid, which currently has at least three flower buds in different stages of production.

My Masdevallia decumana has continued to delight me with its almost continuous flowering display. This Masdevallia decumana has been in flower since since January 2016 – certainly there has always been a bud on the horizon since it started flowering, and as the buds are quick to develop, there isn’t too long to wait for the new blooms to appear. There’s always a new flower to look forward to at the moment, with this super miniature orchid, which currently has at least three flower buds in different stages of production.

Masdevallia decumana

Another view of my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Another view of my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here's a closer look at one of the newest buds, and the newest leaves my Masdevallia decumana has produced. As pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s a closer look at one of the newest buds, and the newest leaves my Masdevallia decumana has produced. As pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’

As I mentioned in my previous update my Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor' has recently finished flowering, this orchid flowers naturally from winter until springtime. Here is the Bulbophyllum, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

As I mentioned in my previous update my Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’ has recently finished flowering, this orchid flowers naturally from winter until springtime. Here is the Bulbophyllum, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here's a closer look at the pseudobulbs of my Bulbophyllum falcatum 'Minor', as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s a closer look at the pseudobulbs of my Bulbophyllum falcatum ‘Minor’, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Positioning of plants within the terrarium

My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum is already looking much happier since I reorganised the planting inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium last month. During my re-organisation, I took the opportunity to re-mount this orchid, moving it, so that the plant would receive a greater amount of light and moisture. The Diplocaulobium is pictured here on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum is already looking much happier since I reorganised the planting inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium last month. During my re-organisation, I took the opportunity to re-mount this orchid, moving it, so that the plant would receive a greater amount of light and moisture. The Diplocaulobium is pictured here on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

It's wonderful to see new roots being produced by my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum. As pictured here on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

It’s wonderful to see new roots being produced by my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum. As pictured here on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here's another look at the lovely new roots produced by my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum. These new roots have been produced in the month since I moved this miniature orchid into a more beneficial position within my BiOrbAir, where the orchid now receives a greater amount of both light and moisture.

Here’s another look at the lovely new roots produced by my Diplocaulobium abbreviatum. These new roots have been produced in the month since I moved this miniature orchid into a more beneficial position within my BiOrbAir, where the orchid now receives a greater amount of both light and moisture.

My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum is looking much happier since I reorganised the planting inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium last month. During my re-organisation I took the opportunity to re-mount this orchid, and move it into a better position, where the plant would receive more light and moisture. Pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.

My Diplocaulobium abbreviatum is looking much happier since I reorganised the planting inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium last month. During my re-organisation I took the opportunity to re-mount this orchid, and move it into a better position, where the plant would receive more light and moisture. Pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.

Dryadella simula

My Dryadella simula was already in flower when I purchased it on the 1st April 2016, from Akerne Orchids, at The RHS London Orchid Show. As you can see the Dryadella's flowering is in full force now, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

My Dryadella simula was already in flower when I purchased it on the 1st April 2016, from Akerne Orchids, at The RHS London Orchid Show. As you can see the Dryadella’s flowering is in full force now, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here's a closer look at the flowers of Drydella simula, as pictured on the 9th May 2016.

Here’s a closer look at the flowers of Drydella simula, as pictured on the 9th May 2016.

Dryadella simula, as pictured on the 9th May 2016.

Dryadella simula, as pictured on the 9th May 2016.

Dryadella simula, as pictured on the 9th May 2016.

Dryadella simula, as pictured on the 9th May 2016.

Angraecum equitans

Here's my Angraecum equitans, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s my Angraecum equitans, as pictured on the 9th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Masdevallia rechingeriana flower buds

Masdevallia rechingeriana in bud, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2016.

Masdevallia rechingeriana in bud, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2016.

Here's the latest flower to open on my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 12th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid has flowered very readily inside my BiOrbAir terrarium, producing many large, showy flowers since it began flowering in January 2016. I find this Masdevallia enjoys being watered or misted regularly - it doesn't like its roots to become dry.

Here’s the latest flower to open on my Masdevallia decumana, as pictured on the 12th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. This miniature orchid has flowered very readily inside my BiOrbAir terrarium, producing many large, showy flowers since it began flowering in January 2016. I find this Masdevallia enjoys being watered or misted regularly – it doesn’t like its roots to become dry.

Here's another look at my Masdevallia decumana, which is currently flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2016. I think that the natural pollinator of this miniature orchid would be a fly, or an insect that was attracted to the dark purple colour of the intricately patterned flowers, which bear some resemblance to the colour of meat. This Masdevallia decumana currently has this open flower and three further flower buds, which are in earlier stages of production.

Here’s another look at my Masdevallia decumana, which is currently flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2016. I think that the natural pollinator of this miniature orchid would be a fly, or an insect that was attracted to the dark purple colour of the intricately patterned flowers, which bear some resemblance to the colour of meat. This Masdevallia decumana currently has this open flower and three further flower buds, which are in earlier stages of production.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2016. Inside this terrarium Dryadella simula and Masdevallia decumana are in full flower. The Masdevallia rechingeriana has produced a flower bud which will open in the near future, and Domingoa purpurea has produced two flowering stems, one of which has sadly been blasted, and hasn't opened. The other, more immature flowering stem is unlikely to open into flower for some time yet, if indeed it does successfully flower inside this terrarium. The flowers of Lepanthopsis astrophora 'Stalky' are just going over.

My Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2016. Inside this terrarium Dryadella simula and Masdevallia decumana are in full flower. The Masdevallia rechingeriana has produced a flower bud which will open in the near future, and Domingoa purpurea has produced two flowering stems, one of which has sadly been blasted, and hasn’t opened. The other, more immature flowering stem is unlikely to open into flower for some time yet, if indeed it does successfully flower inside this terrarium. The flowers of Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ are just going over.

Masdevallia rechingeriana bud opening

Here's the newest Masdevallia rechingeriana inflorescence, which is just starting to open today. As pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 13th May 2016.

Here’s the newest Masdevallia rechingeriana inflorescence, which is just starting to open today. As pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 13th May 2016.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Masdevallia rechingeriana.

Here's the Masdevallia rechingeriana inflorescence, as pictured on the 13th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Here’s the Masdevallia rechingeriana inflorescence, as pictured on the 13th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Moving orchids

14th May 2016

Here is my Aerangis. I refer to this miniature orchid as Aerangis fastuosa, as that was the variety that I ordered when I purchased this plant, but I am uncertain as to which variety of Aerangis it actually is. It could be Aerangis fuscata, which is the name that one of my readers suggested. The only way for me to identify with any real certainty which orchid I have, would be if this miniature orchid flowered, when it would be far easier for me to identify. For most of the time I have had this Aerangis it has looked at least a little unhappy - I have been concerned that I would lose this plant. With this in mind, I recently re-mounted this orchid, moving it into in a horizontal position, mounted on a fresh piece of cork. I am now moving this Aerangis to a shadier place, in my other BiorbAir terrarium, as I am concerned that since I moved this plant to its new mount, that it may have been in a far brighter position, receiving more light that it would have preferred.

Here is my Aerangis. I refer to this miniature orchid as Aerangis fastuosa, as that was the variety that I ordered when I purchased this plant, but I am uncertain as to which variety of Aerangis it actually is. It could be Aerangis fuscata, which is the name that one of my readers suggested. The only way for me to identify with any real certainty which orchid I have, would be if this miniature orchid flowered, when it would be far easier for me to identify. For most of the time I have had this Aerangis it has looked at least a little unhappy – I have been concerned that I would lose this plant. With this in mind, I recently re-mounted this orchid, moving it into in a horizontal position, mounted on a fresh piece of cork. I am now moving this Aerangis to a shadier place, in my other BiorbAir terrarium, as I am concerned that since I moved this plant to its new mount, that it may have been in a far brighter position, receiving more light that it would have preferred.

I’ve been thinking about my miniature orchids inside this terrarium, and also the miniature orchids that are growing inside my other BiOrbAir terrarium, I have been a bit concerned about my Phalaenopsis parishii, a dear little plant that has been growing in my other BiOrbAir.  I have been concerned that perhaps my home provides cooler conditions than this orchid would prefer, and I wondered if it would be a fraction warmer inside my other terrarium, which is in a slightly (though not much!) warmer room.  So I took the decision this evening to move my Phalaenopsis parishii specimen into my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  You can read about this orchid’s continuing progress and development in this review.

I have also moved my Aerangis fastuosa specimen from this BiOrbAir terrarium, into my other BiOrbAir terrarium.  My reason for moving the Aerangis was simply because although both of the rooms that my BiOrbAir terrariums reside in are very dark, the Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir receives a little more sunlight, than my other BiOrbAir terrarium.  I thought moving the Aerangis fastuosa to a shadier spot might benefit it.

Orchid Flowers!

Dryadella simula flowering

Here's a closer look at two of the flowers of my Dryadella simula, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 14th May 2016. Currently this miniature orchid has eight open flowers, two unopened flowers and two flowers that have just gone over. This miniature orchid was in flower when I purchased it on the 1st April 2016, it has been flowering ever since.

Here’s a closer look at two of the flowers of my Dryadella simula, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 14th May 2016. Currently this miniature orchid has eight open flowers, two unopened flowers, and two flowers that have just gone over. This miniature orchid was in flower when I purchased it on the 1st April 2016, it has been flowering consistently ever since.

Masdevallia rechingeriana flowering

Here's a look inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2016. Today the Masdevallia rechingeriana flower opened.

Here’s a look inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2016. Today the Masdevallia rechingeriana flower opened.

Newly opened flowers…….

Masdevallia rechingeriana in flower, on the 14th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Masdevallia rechingeriana in flower, on the 14th May 2016, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

The newest Masdevallia rechingeriana inflorescence opened today inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. Pictured on the 14th May 2016 - the day the flower opened.

The newest Masdevallia rechingeriana inflorescence opened today inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. Pictured on the 14th May 2016 – the day the flower opened.

Masdevallia rechingeriana in flower inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 14th May 2016.

Masdevallia rechingeriana in flower inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 14th May 2016.

Masdevallia rechingeriana, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 14th May 2016.

Masdevallia rechingeriana, as pictured inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 14th May 2016.

Masdevallia decumana flowering

Here's a Masdevallia decumana flower - this orchid is also flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. Pictured on the 14th May 2016.

Here’s a Masdevallia decumana flower – this orchid is also flowering inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. Pictured on the 14th May 2016.

Here's my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2016. Inside this terrarium, Dryadella simula, Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, and Phalaenopsis parishii are all in flower.

Here’s my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 14th May 2016. Inside this terrarium, Dryadella simula, Masdevallia decumana, Masdevallia rechingeriana, and Phalaenopsis parishii are all in flower.

To read the next part of my trial – BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir (part four), please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………………

To visit the BiOrbAir website, please click here.

To see the planting list for this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, and find the details of the companies I purchased my orchids, moss and cork from, please click here.

To read the first part of this Miniature Orchid Trial – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To read the second part of this Miniature Orchid Trial – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To see a longer list of miniature orchids that I have trialled to see if they are suited to terrarium growing, please click here.

To see an even longer planting list of wider range of suitable plants to grow inside terrariums and bottle gardens, please click here.

To read about the Queen Of Orchids, the largest known species of orchid in the world, which flowered for the first time at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in 2015, please click here.

To read about carnivorous plants, please click here.

To read about using decorative features in your terrarium or bottle garden, please click here.

To read my review of the special features of the BiOrbAir, please click here.

I have two BiOrbAir terrariums that I have reviewed; I have grown different plants in each terrarium, to read the first part of my long term review of the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To read the second part of my long term review of the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To read the third part of my long term review of the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To read the fourth part of my long term review of the BiOrbAir, please click here.

To read about the 20 shortlisted plants, including the finalists and winner of The RHS Chelsea Flower Show Plant Of The Year 2015, please click here.

To read about The RHS London Orchid Show 2016, please click here.

For gardening advice for mid-April to mid-May, please click here.

For gardening advice for mid-May to mid-June, please click here.

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