Nick Bailey and The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden

The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden was designed by Nick Bailey, the Head Gardener of the Chelsea Physic Garden, and built by Gardenlink.  

Copper is a predominant feature of The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden. This copper stair rail is etched with plant growth algorithms, and has been designed to represent an emerging seedling. In this photograph you can see something of the mathematical symbol for infinity, which forms the main structure for this garden's layout.

Copper is a predominant feature of The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden. This copper stair rail is etched with plant growth algorithms, and has been designed to represent an emerging seedling. In this photograph you can see something of the mathematical symbol for infinity, which forms the main structure for this garden’s layout.

Nick Bailey’s design for The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden focuses on the mathematical patterns that appear in plants and in nature, underpinning our natural world – such as the Golden Ratio.  These mathematical patterns are expressed throughout the garden’s structure, the layout of the planting, and the featured plants.  Plants used to demonstrate the mathematical properties within the garden, include Aloe polyphylla with its spiral form, Gleditsia triacanthos, which has a complex but regular leaf pattern, and Helianthus annuus, the sunflower, whose flower head is made up of hundreds of tiny florets laid out in a double–spiral that follows the Fibonacci sequence.

Nick Bailey, pictured in The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden that he designed for The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

Nick Bailey, pictured in The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden that he designed for The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

I had a quick catch up with Nick Bailey, to find out more about The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden, that Nick designed for The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

B: Did you have to learn much maths for this, or do you have a maths background already?

NB: I’m terrible at maths, but Winton, our sponsor, it’s their absolute specialism.

B: Have you got a favourite area of the garden?

NB: I haven’t had time to think about it, to be honest!  I like the succulents up at the top, and probably the meadow really – as we’ve got the most unusual things in there.

B: What’s the most unusual plant you’ve got in the garden?

NB: Probably the Aloe polyphylla up at the front, I think they’re the only seven plants in the country at the moment.  It comes from Lesotho, you know that little land-locked country in south Africa. 

Plants used to demonstrate the mathematical properties within the garden, include Aloe polyphylla with its spiral form, Gleditsia triacanthos, which has a complex but regular leaf pattern, and Helianthus annuus, the sunflower, whose flower head is made up of hundreds of tiny florets laid out in a double–spiral that follows the Fibonacci sequence.

Plants used to demonstrate the mathematical properties within the garden, include Aloe polyphylla with its spiral form, Gleditsia triacanthos, which has a complex but regular leaf pattern, and Helianthus annuus, the sunflower, whose flower head is made up of hundreds of tiny florets laid out in a double–spiral that follows the Fibonacci sequence.

A trio of Echeveria 'Duchess of Nuremberg' with Acaena inermis ‘Purpurea’, and Aloe polyphylla, pictured in The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

A trio of Echeveria ‘Duchess of Nuremberg’ with Acaena inermis ‘Purpurea’, and Aloe polyphylla, pictured in The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden was designed by Nick Bailey, the Head Gardener of the Chelsea Physic Garden, and built by Gardenlink. The RHS judges awarded The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden a Silver-Gilt Medal, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016. The copper water feature you see in this photograph was made by sculptor Giles Rayner.

The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden was designed by Nick Bailey, the Head Gardener of the Chelsea Physic Garden, and built by Gardenlink. The RHS judges awarded The Winton Capital Beauty of Mathematics Garden a Silver-Gilt Medal, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016. The copper water feature you see in this photograph was made by sculptor Giles Rayner.

These large specimens of Pinus sylvestris 'Watereri' were a real feature of The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

These large specimens of Pinus sylvestris ‘Watereri’ were a real feature of The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

Allium atropurpureum, and Briza media combine with Geum 'Mai Tai', in The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

Allium atropurpureum, and Briza media combine with Geum ‘Mai Tai’, in The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden, at The RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016.

The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden features the mathematical symbol for infinity as the main shape for the structure of the garden. There are numerous references to mathematical theories throughout the garden, as this garden celebrates the beauty of the mathematics and algorithms that underpin all plants, nature, and life itself.

The Winton Beauty of Mathematics Garden features the mathematical symbol for infinity as the main shape for the structure of the garden. There are numerous references to mathematical theories throughout the garden, as this garden celebrates the beauty of the mathematics and algorithms that underpin all plants, nature, and life itself.

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