White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial (part eight)

Welcome to the eighth part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial.

I decided to plant up this White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium in April 2017, after receiving many requests from readers asking about white flowered, miniature, epiphytic orchids to grow in terrariums.  I didn’t have a spare terrarium available to plant at the time, so I made the decision to empty, and then re-plant my long-term review BiOrbAir terrarium with a variety of different species of white-flowering orchids, to showcase how beautiful a single colour planting scheme for terrariums, vivariums, orchidariums, or bottle gardens, can be.

The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated, terrarium, which was designed by Barry Reynolds, and is available from BiOrb.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAIr Terrarium, as pictured on the 19th December 2017, inside this terrarium Amesiella minor is in flower.

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium Planting List

    • Aerangis hyaloides
    • Aerangis mystacidii
    • Amesiella minor
    • Amesiella monticola
    • Amesiella philippinensis
    • Brachypeza semiteretifolia
    • Ceratochilus biglandulosus
    • Ceratostylis pristina
    • Constantia cipoensis
    • Holcoglossum flavescens
    • Holcoglossum weixiense
    • Humata repens
    • Hymenorchis javanica
    • Masdevallia tovarensis
    • Neofinetia falcata
    • Podangis dactyloceras 

Since I set up this terrarium in April 2017, I have already made some changes, removing some plants and making some new introductions to this terrarium.  On the 28th May 2017, I added a young Aerangis mystacidii specimen, which had been previously growing inside a flask, and at the same time I introduced an attractive fern, Humata repens, which was previously growing inside another of my terrariums, to this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Then on the 12th November 2017, I rearranged this White Orchid Trial Terrarium, I removed some of the orchids that were growing inside this White Orchid Trial Terrarium, relocating these plants to my other terrariums.  At this time I introduced some new miniature orchids to this White Orchid Trial.  I had thought I had finished re-arranging my terrariums, at least for a while, but on the 22nd December 2017, I made a spur of the moment decision to add one of my Aerangis hyaloides specimens to this terrarium.  The planting list that you can see above is the current list of all of the miniature orchids that are currently residing inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. Inside this terrarium Aerangis hyaloides and Amesiella minor are in flower, and Brachypeza semiteretifolia and Holcoglossum weixiensis are in bud.

You can see the full planting list for this terrarium here.  Here you’ll find more details about each of the orchids that are currently growing inside this terrarium, as well as details of any other orchids that have previously been trialled inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, together with the details of all of the nurseries and suppliers where I purchased all of my orchids, mosses, and cork for this terrarium.

Alternatively, if you’re looking for more information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. Inside this terrarium Aerangis hyaloides and Amesiella minor are in flower, and Brachypeza semiteretifolia and Holcoglossum weixiensis are in bud.

White flowered miniature epiphytic orchids

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. Inside this terrarium Aerangis hyaloides and Amesiella minor are in flower, and Brachypeza semiteretifolia and Holcoglossum weixiensis are in bud.

Merry Christmas!  I am dreaming of White Orchids this Christmas!  This is such an exciting time inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium!  Some of the miniature orchids that are growing inside this rather glamorous terrarium have recently flowered, other plants are in bud, some flower buds have aborted, while other orchids are blooming, beautiful decorating this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium with their glamorous white flowers.  The results of all of this most exciting, recent activity that has all taken place over the past month can be seen here in this review:

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. Inside this terrarium Aerangis hyaloides and Amesiella minor are in flower, and Brachypeza semiteretifolia and Holcoglossum weixiensis are in bud.
My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. Inside this terrarium Aerangis hyaloides and Amesiella minor are in flower, and Brachypeza semiteretifolia and Holcoglossum weixiensis are in bud.

Aerangis hyaloides

Aerangis hyaloides pictured in flower, with a British five pence piece coin to demonstrate the small size of the plant, on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Up until the 22nd December 2017, this particular Aerangis hyaloides specimen was growing very happily inside another of my terrariums, and I had no plans to change this.   Aerangis hyaloides is such a special and beautiful, white flowered miniature orchid, this is one of my favourite miniature orchids.  On being reminded of this particular plant’s beauty, as its flowers opened, and, I must admit, after not watering another of my Aerangis hyaloides specimens (the Aerangis hyaloides specimen that now resides inside my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium) frequently enough, much to the plant’s detriment, I decided to move this Aerangis hyaloides specimen into this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I simply love Aerangis hyaloides, it is one of my favourite miniature orchids!

It was a spur of the moment decision to move this Aerangis hyaloides plant into this terrarium, so I am thankful that I took a few photographs of this plant as it came into flower, inside another of my terrariums, which you can see below.

Aerangis hyaloides as pictured on the 17th September 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides as pictured on the 16th October 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 25th October 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 3rd November 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 8th November 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 21st November 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 30th November 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 7th December 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 13th December 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 15th December 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 17th December 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 17th December 2017.
Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 18th December 2017.
A closer look at Aerangis hyaloides pictured in flower on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at Aerangis hyaloides pictured in flower on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Aerangis mystacidii

Aerangis mystacidii, as pictured on the 24th December 2017, inside the White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I now have just one Aerangis mystacidii specimen residing inside this terrarium.  I moved the other Aerangis mystacidii specimen, which was previously growing inside this White Orchid Trial Terrarium to another of my terrariums.  This move was made, simply to free up more space inside this terrarium, to allow me to grow and trial a wider range of miniature orchid species inside this White Orchid Trial Terrarium.

I am pleased with the growth and development of this young Aerangis mystacidii specimen.  I am glad to have been able to include this Aerangis species inside this terrarium.

Amesiella minor

Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 6th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

It is with absolute joy that I share my photographs of this Amesiella minor specimen and its truly beautiful, sparkling flower with you!  This miniature orchid’s flowering feels like a very special moment, as well as a great relief, as this Amesiella minor specimen was only introduced into this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 12th November 2017.  This specimen was already in bud when this plant was transferred from another of my terrariums into this one.  It’s not a good idea to move plants while they are in bud, especially orchids, as you risk the plant sensing a change of circumstances, not having sufficient  water or resources and consequently protecting itself from danger by aborting its bud and diverting its energy into growing, so as to best secure the plant’s future.  Orchids are not stupid and generally speaking, they will not kill themselves to flower, preferring to secure themselves by putting their energy into growing, if the optimum conditions to flower are not present, or if an unexpected change in conditions arises.

Happily, I was fortunate on this occasion, and my Amesiella minor specimen has successfully flowered inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as you can see in my photographs below.

Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 7th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 9th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 9th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 15th December 2017, inside my BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 15th December 2017, inside my BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 15th December 2017, inside my BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 17th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured as this miniature orchid’s flower opened, on the 18th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, pictured in flower on the 18th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I have placed a British five pence piece coin alongside this Amesiella minor specimen, to clearly demonstrate the diminutive size of this miniature orchid and its flower, which is very large considering the small size of the plant.
Amesiella minor, as pictured on the 18th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at this Amesiella minor inflorescence, as pictured on the 18th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 18th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured as its flower opened on the 18th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured as this miniature orchid’s flower opened, on the 19th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, pictured in flower on the 19th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I have placed a British five pence piece coin alongside this Amesiella minor specimen, to clearly demonstrate the diminutive size of this miniature orchid and its flower, which is very large considering the small size of the plant.
Amesiella minor, as pictured as this miniature orchid’s flower opened, on the 19th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, pictured in flower on the 19th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium. I have placed a British five pence piece coin alongside this Amesiella minor specimen, to clearly demonstrate the diminutive size of this miniature orchid and its flower, which is very large considering the small size of the plant.
Amesiella minor, as pictured as this miniature orchid’s flower opened, on the 19th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 20th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 20th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 20th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 20th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 20th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor, as pictured in flower on the 20th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella minor flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. The fern in this photograph is Humata repens.
Amesiella minor flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. The fern in this photograph is Humata repens.

Amesiella monticola

Amesiella monticola, as pictured on the 24th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

It’s wonderful to have the three Amesiella species growing together inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium!  All three of these miniature Amesiella species originate from the Philippines, although the plants might not grow together in quite as close quarters in their natural environment, as I have positioned the plants within this White Orchid Trial Terrarium.  I just love Amesiellas, so I am absolutely thrilled to grow these super plants alongside each other!

Amesiella monticola, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I cannot help but admire this Amesiella monticola specimen.  I love the manner in which this plant’s prominent and central leaf, which was cleanly eaten through by a cheeky terrarium snail, is with dogged determination regrowing out of the chewed corner of the leaf where the damage occurred.

Amesiella monticola, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Amesiella philippinensis

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I think I have told you already, but I really love Amesiella!  I am so looking forward to seeing this Amesiella philippinensis specimen’s blooms!   Meanwhile, it’s quite simply fascinating to watch while this plant develops and produces its inflorescences.  Observing each stage as the Amesiella philippinensis flowers develop is such a treat, one which I am absolutely delighted to share with you.

I really am absolutely thrilled that this Amesiella philippinensis specimen is going to flower inside this terrarium!  Earlier this year, I had concerns that the environment inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, (which was where this particular miniature orchid resided, prior to being moved into this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 12th November 2017), was too dry to induce flowering.   I was so very happy to be wrong on this occasion!

I positioned this miniature orchid at the top of the planting in its previous terrarium home, which was very close to the BiOrbAir’s fan, meaning that any moisture around the plant’s roots and leaves rapidly evaporated, due to the faster air circulation and increased air movement in this section of the terrarium.  Quite frequently this left this Amesiella philippinensis specimen drier than it wished to be.  With this in mind, I have positioned this Amesiella philippinensis specimen further away from the fan, in a lower position within the terrarium, this will give this plant more time to make use of any moisture around it, but along with the positives, there are negative effects – too much moisture can be detrimental to a plant, as can poor air circulation, and lower light levels, which is what this plant will experience in a lower, more contained position within this terrarium.  You will be able to follow this Amesiella philippinensis specimen and see its progress in my continuing reviews and trial updates.  I am so looking forward to sharing this miniature orchid’s flowering with you!

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A new Amesiella philippinensis leaf developing, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at this Amesiella philippinensis specimen’s racemose inflorescence developing, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at this Amesiella philippinensis specimen’s racemose inflorescence developing, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Brachypeza semiteretifolia

Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimen in bud, as pictured on the 19th December 2017.

This Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimen is in bud, this will be the first time that this particular Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimen has flowered inside this terrarium.  After experiencing and relishing every moment of the flowering of the other Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimen that resides inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium a few months ago now, back in September 2017, I simply cannot wait to see this miniature orchid’s bloom as it opens.  I am looking forward with eager anticipation of being enveloped by this flower’s intoxicating perfume again.

After experiencing Brachypeza semiteretifolia‘s flowering, this miniature orchid has become one of my favourite miniature orchids!  I am so very lucky to have two of these plants growing inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium!

A closer look at this Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimen and its bud, as pictured on the 19th December 2017.
Brachypeza semiteretifolia, as pictured on the 24th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Pictured above, you can see the Brachypeza semiteretifolia specimen that has already bloomed inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAIr Terrarium, this plant is not producing a flower bud at this current time, but the plant is healthy and is growing well.  I am fortunate indeed to have two plants of this cute miniature orchid species inside this terrarium.

Ceratochilus biglandulosus

Ceratochilus biglandulosus, as pictured on the 24th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

This Ceratochilus biglandulosus specimen was moved back into this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 12th November 2017.  This particular Ceratochilus biglandulosus specimen was included in the original planting of this terrarium back in April 2017.  This plant rapidly declined after its introduction to this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, and so this specimen was swiftly moved into my Orchidarium, where it received a brighter intensity of light and a fairly substantial misting each morning.  As the plant had stabilised and recovered from this initial trauma by November 2017, I decided to give this orchid another chance inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, so the move back into this terrarium was made.

Ceratochilus biglandulosus, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I am keeping a close eye on this specimen, if the plant looks to be declining in any way, I shall move this Ceratochilus biglandulosus specimen straight back into my Orchidarium.  Happily I can report as much as: so far, so good.  So far, I can see no ill effects from this Ceratochilus biglandulosus specimen’s move into this terrarium.

Ceratostylis pristina

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 6th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

The fleeting, glistening blooms of this Ceratostylis pristina specimen delivered a delightful sparkle to this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium from the end of November 2017, until the beginning of December 2017.  Despite this inflorescence’s small size and lack of fragrance, these twinkling flowers made quite an impact on this terrarium, and were much admired.  You can see the last of the three Ceratostylis pristina blooms in the photographs I have taken above and below, while photographs of the earlier flowers can be seen in my previous update for this terrarium.

The last Ceratostylis pristina flower that you can see pictured in this update, fell from this plant on the 7th December 2017.  During this latest flowering period these Ceratostylis pristina flowers opened almost in succession.  The first Ceratostylis pristina flower opened on the 17th November 2017, and the last flower fell from the plant on the 7th December 2017; thus providing a blooming period of 20 days in total, which included some days when only flower buds were present between the last flower fading and the next flower bud opening.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 6th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 6th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Constantia cipoensis

Constantia cipoensis, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside the White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I was unsure how successfully this Constantia cipoensis specimen would grow inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium when I introduced this plant to this terrarium.  Certainly I wish for this orchid species to grow and flourish inside this wonderful terrarium.  I am thrilled to see the new growth that this Constantia cipoensis has produced since since it has been growing inside this White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Constantia cipoensis is a truly beautiful orchid, even when it is not flowering, this miniature orchid has a charm and beauty all of its own.

Constantia cipoensis, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside the White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Holcoglossum flavescens

Holcoglossum flavescens, as pictured on the 24th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I feel very concerned about this Holcoglossum flavescens specimen, the plant seems to have dropped a number of leaves, with another leaf currently in the process of yellowing, after which I suspect it will be dropped.  I wonder whether I used too much moss when I mounted this miniature orchid – I plan to remove some of the moss around this Holcoglossum flavescens specimen’s roots tomorrow.  I certainly wish and hope that this Holcoglossum flavescens specimen will recover and turn its fortunes around.

Holcoglossum weixiense

Holcoglossum weixiense, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Many of the miniature orchids, including this Holcoglossum weixiense specimen, were in bud when I moved the plants to this terrarium.  As I have said before, moving orchids, or indeed any plants when they are in bud is not a wise move if you would like to see the plant flower successfully and want to take the best care of your plants.  Orchids often abort their flower buds if they do not have sufficient moisture, or sense too great a change in conditions.  Many gardeners take this somewhat personally, please let me reassure you – your orchid is not aborting its flowers to spite you, the plant is simply protecting itself, putting its energy into growth, to stabilising the plant and protecting it.  Rather than frivolously wasting energy on flowers, instead the plant conserves its resources for growth and to ensure the plant’s longevity.

Holcoglossum weixiense, as pictured on the 13th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Unfortunately I had to undertake the rearrangement of my terrariums during November 2017.  With a large collection of orchids, if you’re conducting a large scale rearrangement, it is inevitable that some plants will be in bud, whichever time you plan to undertake your changes.  Here in the following photographs, you can follow this Holcoglossum weixiense specimen’s buds, as they sadly falter and then begin to abort.  I am assuming at this stage that both of these developing flowering stems will fail.

A closer look at this Holcoglossum weixiense specimen’s developing inflorescence, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at this Holcoglossum weixiense specimen’s flower buds, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at this Holcoglossum weixiense specimen’s flower buds, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Humata repens

Amesiella minor flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. The fern in this photograph is Humata repens.

Humata repens is an enchanting little fern species, which is flourishing inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  It’s not always easy to find miniature ferns for terrariums, many of the ferns that garden centres sell grow too tall to sit comfortably inside a terrarium.  Humata repens in certainly a fern that I would recommend for terrariums and vivariums.  I have this fern species planted inside a number of my terrariums, each terrarium offering a differing light quality and moisture levels.  I can report that all of these ferns are thriving.

Amesiella minor flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. The fern in this photograph is Humata repens.
Amesiella minor flowering inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 23rd December 2017. The fern in this photograph is Humata repens.

Hymenorchis javanica

Hymenorchis javanica, as pictured on the 6th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Hymenorchis javanica is another miniature orchid that was in bud when I moved this plant from another of my terrariums into this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium on the 12th November 2017.  I am just hoping that this wonderful miniature orchid flowers successfully, as I would love to share this orchid species’ simply delightful flowers with you!

Hymenorchis javanica, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look at Hymenorchis javanica in bud, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.
A closer look Hymenorchis javanica in bud, as pictured on the 22nd December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Masdevallia tovarensis

Masdevallia tovarensis, as pictured inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 25th December 2017.

I divided this Masdevallia tovarensis specimen on the 12th November 2017.  I think that the piece of the division that you can see pictured above was the smallest of the divisions made at this time, this was the piece of Masdevallia tovarensis that I included back inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.   I was absolutely thrilled to see that this plant is already in the process of producing a new leaf!  Hooray!

Masdevallia tovarensis, as pictured inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 25th December 2017.

Neofinetia falcata

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Neofinetia falcata is a much revered, respected, and admired orchid, which has legions of fans across the world.  I am one of these many Neofinetia falcata fans, for I have been utterly charmed by this special orchid.  I have been very happy with the growth and performance of this orchid inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I am looking forward to seeing this Neofinetia falcata specimen’s magnificent flowers in 2018.

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Podangis dactyloceras 

Podangis dactyloceras, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I am so happy that this Podangis dactyloceras specimen is growing so well inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  This is an attractive, fan shaped orchid, which enhances the planting within this terrarium.  My Christmas wish is for this delightful orchid, which was given to me by a friend, to flower in 2018!  I hope that your Christmas hopes and wishes will come true.  I wish you a very merry Christmas!

Podangis dactyloceras, as pictured on the 25th December 2017, inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

To head straight to the next update for this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, and see Aerangis hyaloides, Amesiella minor, Brachypeza semiteretifolia, Hymenorchis javanica, in flower, please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

To read about the great new features of the 2017 BiOrbAir terrarium, please click here.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

To read a Planting List of a wide range and variety of beautiful plants which are suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To see a Planting List of beautiful, miniature orchids, suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, bottle gardens, and indoor gardens, please click here.

To read about the Writhlington Orchid Project, please click here.

To read about the Queen of Orchids – the largest known orchid species, and this plant’s flowering at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in September 2015, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

2 thoughts on “White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial (part eight)

  1. Amazing article, beautiful photography. Thank you Beth and I hope you are having a nice Christmas and wishing you and Mark a happy New Year.

    1. Hello Richard, it’s so lovely to hear from you! Thank you for your kind comment, I am so glad that you liked the article. I hope you’re having a wonderful Christmas and a lovely break from work. Merry Christmas and best wishes, Beth

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