Would you like to see my miniature orchids that are in flower today?

Miniature Orchids in Flower today!

It’s so wonderful to be able to share these photographs that I have taken of my orchids’ latest flowers with you – these photographs are of the very same inflorescences that are open now – these are the orchid blooms that I am enjoying today – I hope that you’ll enjoy these miniature orchid flowers with me.  I hope to share the joy of these flowers and at the same time pass on a few tips and ideas, to help you to grow these miniature orchids successfully yourself.

Masdevallia decumana

Masdevallia decumana, pictured in flower on the 11th October 2018.

Masdevallia decumana is a very free flowering miniature orchid species, that produces very large, striking flowers, which are adorned with red-maroon coloured exotic looking markings – Masdevallia decumana flowers display a pattern that is similar in shape to the markings seen on a giraffe, but in an entirely different colour!  This orchid’s inflorescences are so large, these two flowers are standing tall and upright, but Masdevallia decumana flowers usually lean forward – when they look like they’re billowing, like sails that have caught the breeze!  Masdevallia decumana flowers all through the year, this orchid species is almost always in flower.  Once a Masdevallia decumana plant begins to produce a flower bud there’s no dilly dallying, usually the flower bud is fully developed and the flower opens around two weeks later.

If you can offer your plant filtered, diffused light, alongside temperatures from 10C (50F) to 28C (82F); you can also provide evenly moist, humid growing conditions and you take care to never allow your Masdevallia decumana plant to dry out, then you’re sure to succeed with Masdevallia decumana!  I currently grow the Masdevallia decumana plant you see here inside my Orchidarium, but I have also grown this same Masdevallia decumana specimen very successfully inside a BiOrbAir terrarium, where this plant flourished.  This orchid thrives when given frequent, regular mistings, my plants have flourished when they were heavily misted with rainwater every other day, to as often as every day – more so in hot, dry conditions.  Don’t allow your Masdevallia decumana plants to dry out, this plant enjoys regular, frequent mistings, so if you’re growing this miniature orchid, ensure that a plant from this particular orchid species always has access to water around the plant’s roots.

A closer look at the centre of one of this Masdevallia decumana specimen’s flowers.

I grow my Masdevallia decumana plants mounted onto cork bark, with the addition of some moss around my plant’s roots for extra water retention.

Masdevallia decumana, pictured in flower on the 11th October 2018.

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ in flower, as pictured on the 11th October 2018.

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ is one of my favourite orchids, if you’ve not seen this miniature orchid before, then I am so excited to be able to show you this amazing orchid!  This miniature orchid is really rather charming, it’s a handsome plant, even when it’s not in bloom.  My plants produce clouds of teeny, tiny, perfectly formed, star-shaped flowers, which seem to glisten and sparkle in the sunlight.  To me, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ blooms look so cheerful and upbeat, the flowers are like little jesters.  The blooms hover like clouds of miniature butterflies around the plant.  The more closely I study Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, the more I fall in love with this plant, when you look at Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ flowers in detail, you can observe the slight iridescence, the sparkle within the structure of the petals on each and every flower.

A closer look at this Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ specimen’s flowers, as pictured on the 11th October 2018.

Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ is pictured here with a British five pence piece to clearly show the diminutive size of this miniature orchid’s flowers.

Hopefully this picture above conveys just how tiny Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ flowers are, this really is a miniature orchid!

A closer look at this Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’ specimen’s flowers, as pictured on the 11th October 2018.

Restrepia sanguinea

Restrepia sanguinea, pictured in flower on the 11th October 2018.

Restrepia sanguinea is another orchid that relies on being misted frequently and needs constant access to moisture around the plant’s roots.  Don’t ever allow your Restrepia sanguinea plant to dry out, your plant needs continually moist growing conditions.  If you can provide similar conditions to those that Restrepia sanguinea enjoys in its native environment, namely temperatures that range from 13C (55F) to 26C (80F) and access to sufficient moisture and humidity – don’t forget that this plant hails from areas of cloud forest, where the air is heavily laden with moisture.  Restrepia sanguinea flourishes in shaded to semi shaded conditions, if you move your plant to a brighter position, you will need to allow for a long period of adjustment while your plant produces new leaves that are acquainted to the greater intensity of light.  Once your plant is happy it should flower frequently, my plants are almost continually in bloom, their raspberry coloured blooms have an elegant disposition and a very graceful form that I admire and appreciate.

Ornithocephalus manabina

Ornithocephalus manabina pictured in flower, on the 11th October 2018.

I am so fond of Ornithocephalus manabina, this miniature orchid species is so pretty and so adorably dainty!  I have a particular fondness for orchids with fan shaped leaves, I really admire this plant’s elegant form.

This Ornithocephalus species hails from Ecuador, where this orchid flourishes in intermediate to warm temperatures that range from 15C (59F) to 35C (95F).  I have found that my plants grow well in a semi shaded to shaded position, where they enjoy soft, filtered, indirect light.

Ornithocephalus manabina pictured in flower, on the 11th October 2018.

A closer look at this Ornithocephalus manabina specimen’s flowers, as pictured in on the 11th October 2018.

This Ornithocephalus manabina specimen has been in flower for a few months now, my plant flowers reliably, twice a year.  Ornithocephalus manabina‘s flower buds open from the base of the flowering spike first, with new flowers opening in sequence working upwards, until the last flower opens, at the tip of the Ornithocephaus manabina‘s flowering stem, and then the flowers fade.

A closer look at this Ornithocephalus manabina specimen’s flowering stem, as pictured in on the 11th October 2018.

A closer look at this Ornithocephalus manabina specimen’s flowers, as pictured in on the 11th October 2018.

Ornithocephalus manabina produces pure, snow white flowers, which fall away from the orchid’s flowering stem, as the blooms fade.

A closer look at this Ornithocephalus manabina specimen’s flowers, as pictured in on the 11th October 2018.

Gastrochilus retrocallus

Gastrochilus retrocallus, also known as Haraella retrocalla in flower, as pictured on the 11th October 2018.

Gastrochilus retrocallus, is a very floriferous orchid species, which was previously known as Haraella retrocalla.  I find that my Gastrochilus retrocallus plants are very easy going, they’re almost always in flower or bud.  If you’re looking for a floriferous orchid species, Gastrochilus retrocallus is definitely another plant to add to your list!

A closer look at this Gastrochilus retrocallus (previously known as Haraella retrocalla) flower, as pictured on the 11th October 2018.

This Gastrochilus retrocallus specimen is growing inside my Orchidarium.  For more information about Gastrochilus retrocallus (Haraella retrocalla), please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

To see pictures of the Queen of Orchids, the largest orchid in the world, please click here.

To see a planting list of mini miniature orchids for terrariums, vivariums, orchidariums, and bottle gardens, please click here.

To see how my Rainforest Terrarium was set up and designed, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

One thought on “Would you like to see my miniature orchids that are in flower today?

  1. Anne Liem

    October 12, 2018 at 5:41pm

    Your orchids are so pretty. It must be a lot of fun for you to plant them, and nurture them and really enjoyable when they are in bloom. Well, I enjoy them too. Not the planting though. I have no luck with orchids. Awesome.

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    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      October 12, 2018 at 10:18pm

      Thank you Anne, I am so glad that you enjoy seeing my pictures. It’s all about finding the right plant for your conditions and finding a plant you’ll love to see each day. If you’d like any tips or ideas let me know – I’d be glad to give you some advice. Best wishes, Beth

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