An update on the Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium

Rainforest Terrarium Update

In March 2018, I commissioned Rich, from Rainforestvivs (now The Rich Rainforest), to build this fabulous, custom built Rainforest Terrarium for me.  I designed my Rainforest Terrarium to fulfil my requirements: I needed to provide an enclosure that would house as large a number of orchids as possible from my National Collection of Miniature Aerangis and Angraecum Species and my National Collection of Miniature Phalaenopsis Species, within the limited space I had available.  I wanted to provide the plants growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium with automatic plant care and I also needed this custom built terrarium to be flexible enough to accommodate my future growing needs and any potential changes in the equipment I use.

My Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 19th January 2019. Inside this terrarium, two Paphiopedilums and an Aerangis orchid are in flower.

If you’re interested, you can read all about the thinking behind my design for this Rainforest Terrarium, in my step-by-step guide to the set up of this Rainforest Terrarium.

My Rainforest Terrarium was delivered to me in April 2018.  My updates on the plants and equipment inside this Rainforest Terrarium are extensive and feature lots of details and photographs.  Consequently, I have divided this update up, so as to make each part more manageable.  You can discover how well this Rainforest Terrarium and my automated plant care equipment has worked over the past eleven months, via this link.

You can see how well my Aerangis, Amesiella, and Angraecum plants have grown over the past eleven months via this link.

Alternatively, read on to discover how well my Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis plants have grown over the past eleven months inside my Rainforest Terrarium, right here – in this update below.

My Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 18th February 2019. Inside this terrarium, a Paphiopedilum orchid is in flower.

Directions for using this Trial Update:

At the top of this update, there’s a list of contents written in red text.  I’ve included this feature, to make it easier for you to find information about a particular plant – simply click on the headings, to head directly to a particular section of this article.

To save time scrolling back up to the top of the page, simply click on the arrow: you’ll find it on the right hand side of the page.  Click on this arrow, to be directed back to the beginning of this update.

My Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 19th January 2019. Inside this terrarium, two Paphiopedilums and an Aerangis orchid are in flower.

Rainforest Terrarium Planting List:

At the time of writing, the following plants are currently growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium:

  • Aerangis calantha
  • Aerangis fastuosa
  • Aerangis fuscata
  • Aerangis hariotiana
  • Aerangis luteo-alba var rhodosticta
  • Aerangis modesta
  • Aerangis mystacidii
  • Aerangis punctata
  • Aerangis spiculata
  • Amesiella minor
  • Amesiella monticola
  • Angraecum aloifolium
  • Angraecum bancoense
  • Angraecum compactum
  • Angraecum didieri
  • Angraecum dollii
  • Angraecum elephantinum
  • Angraecum equitans
  • Angraecum pyriforme
  • Paphiopedilum
  • Paphiopedilum concolor
  • Paphiopedilum esquirolei
  • Paphiopedilum fairrieanum
  • Paphiopedilum henryanum
  • Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum
  • Phalaenopsis appendiculata
  • Phalaenopsis chibae
  • Phalaenopsis cochlearis
  • Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’
  • Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’
  • Phalaenopsis equestris
  • Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’
  • Phalaenopsis fasciata
  • Phalaenopsis finleyi
  • Phalaenopsis gibbosa
  • Phalaenopsis honghenensis
  • Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis
  • Phalaenopsis lindenii
  • Phalaenopsis lobbii
  • Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia
  • Phalaenopsis lowii
  • Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’
  • Phalaenopsis malipoensis
  • Phalaenopsis pallens
  • Phalaenopsis pantherina
  • Phalaenopsis parishii alba
  • Phalaenopsis pulcherrima
  • Phalaenopsis pulchra
  • Phalaenopsis stobartiana
  • Phalaenopsis taenialis
  • Phalaenopsis wilsonii
This is my custom built Rainforest Terrarium, which was built by Rich from Rainforestvivs.

You can discover more details and see photographs of all of the plants that are growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium in my Rainforest Terrarium Planting List.  This list includes information about all of the plants that are currently growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, it also includes details of any plants that have been grown inside my Rainforest Terrarium in the past.  Rest assured that any plants that I introduce to this Rainforest Terrarium in the future, will also be added to this list.

I’ve listed all of the nurseries and suppliers where I have purchased my plants, cork, and moss, etc at the bottom of this planting list.

My Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 24th January 2019. Inside this terrarium, two Paphiopedilums and an Aerangis orchid are in flower.

Paphiopedilum plant care and growing conditions

Paphiopedilum compost

The Paphiopedilum plants that are planted at the base of this Rainforest Terrarium, have all been planted in plastic containers filled with a speciality orchid compost, which is comprised of large pieces of fir bark, perlite, pumice, and moss, with dolomite lime, to create an open, coarse growing medium that allows air to circulate around the plant’s roots and water to run freely (and quickly) through the plant’s container.

The Paphiopedilum plants inside my Rainforest Terrarium are actually planted inside their pots.  These Paphs are surrounded by peat free coir compost, which is topped with moss.  The plants are watered by the automated misting unit that operates inside the Rainforest Terrarium, the water runs through the bottom of each plant’s plastic pot, into the reservoir below.

Growing conditions for the Paphiopedilum orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium

None of the Paphiopedilum plants inside my Rainforest Terrarium are ever sitting in water, but I feel that most of these plants have been grown in wetter conditions than they would have chosen over the past few months.  This has happened in part as I have a number of orchids, namely: Aerangis fastuosa, Aerangis equitans, and Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana, which have required a far greater quantity of water that the other orchids that reside inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  While, some of my other orchids that are growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium have also been dehydrated and have required additional misting on top of the automatic misting that my MistKing misting unit has provided.

If you’re interested, you can find out more about the equipment I use inside my Rainforest Terrarium, in my article that shows how this terrarium was set up and in my latest update that shows how this equipment has performed over the past eleven months, from April 2018 to March 2019.

Misting Paphiopedilum plants

I have provided these particular aforementioned plants with additional hand misting.  In addition to the hand misting which is tailored to individual plant needs (and weekly time restraints!).  I provide all of the plants inside this Rainforest Terrarium with a twice daily automated misting service, thanks to my MistKing misting system: once, for 1 minute 30 seconds, at 8.30am, and again, for 30 seconds, at 12.30pm (lunchtime).

My Paphiopedilum plants appreciate and flourish in the humidity that my automatic misting system provides.  Although, I am concerned that this frequent misting creates an additional layer of moisture which falls onto the Paphs, delivering more water than most of these plants require.  As my Paphiopedilum plants are grown in plastic containers, which are planted into a mossy area, at the base of my Rainforest Terrarium, the plants’ roots have continuous access to moisture, as the moisture here, below ground, cannot evaporate as easily as the moisture around the roots of my mounted orchids.  The Paphiopedilum plants’ roots do not dry out in the same manner or speed that the roots of my plants that are grown as cork mounted, epiphytic orchids.

Improving the growing conditions for the Paphiopedilum orchids

A shorter burst of mist, more often, would suit my Paphiopedilum plants more than the set up I have created here.  This is one of the difficulties that can arise when orchids that are cultivated using different methods are grown together.

When I was setting up this terrarium, I hoped to unite these orchids, by utilising the different areas and equipment inside this Rainforest Terrarium to create optimum growing conditions for each of the orchids that reside inside this enclosure.  I have quite a way to go until I reach this point.  I have lots of ideas of ways that I can improve the growing conditions for these Paphiopedilums, I’ll let you know how the plants grow and develop in my next update.

Self-seeded ferns

I always find self-seeded ferns growing inside my Terrariums.  To help to counteract the excess moisture at the base of my Rainforest Terrarium and create more favourable growing conditions for my Paphiopedilum orchids, I have allowed the self-seeded ferns to grow in amongst these plants.  Once the ferns grow too large in size, I remove them.  I then allow any new ferns seedlings to grow up and take their place.

If you’re interested, you can read more about the conditions inside this Rainforest Terrarium, over the past eleven months, in this update on the equipment and how it has performed inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

My Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 19th January 2019. Inside this terrarium, two Paphiopedilums and an Aerangis orchid are in flower. In this photograph, you can see one of the pots that this Paphiopedilum orchid is growing in, whilst being planted in the base of this terrarium.

Fertiliser

On the 15th September 2018, I changed the fertiliser that I used for my orchids.  I was happy with the fertiliser that I was using before September 2018 (Orchid Focus Grow and Orchid Focus Bloom), but I was keen to try Akerne Orchids Rain Mix, as I wanted to find out more about this product.  I’ll write a separate post about this fertiliser once I have spent a longer period of time trying it out.  I was in no way unhappy with Orchid Focus, I simply changed the fertiliser I was using, as I wanted to learn more about another product.

Rainforest Terrarium Insects and Pests

Millipedes

OK, so millipedes aren’t strictly an insect, but I am listing them here all the same!

Millipedes feasting on cucumber inside my Rainforest Terrarium on the 5th September 2018.

In the autumn of 2018, I noticed that I seemed to have millipedes living inside almost all of my terrariums!  I was shocked at the number of millepedes I spotted inside so many of my indoor gardens.  I would never wish to keep or trap any creatures inside my terrariums.  So, I added some large slices of cucumber to my terrariums, to attract the millipedes and allow these creatures to be carefully scooped up and moved out of this terrarium with the minimum amount of fuss or distress to either me or the millepedes.  My cucumber method works particularly well for gathering up millipedes, and slugs, and snails, too!

Sciarid fly

Nemasys® Biological Fruit and Veg Protection contains a mix of different nematodes to treat a variety of plant pests, including: sciarid fly, thrips, as well as carrot root fly, cabbage root fly, leatherjackets, cutworms, onion fly, gooseberry sawfly, codling moth, ants, and caterpillars.

In February and March 2019, I noticed that I had sciarid flies (also known as fungus gnats) inside many of my terrariums.  I also noticed these tiny, irritating flies flitting around my houseplants.  On the 9th March 2019, I treated the moss and the Paphiopedilum orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium with a drench of Nemasys® Biological Fruit and Veg Protection.  This biological control features a mixture of different nematode species to control a wide range of pests found indoors and outside, including: sciarid fly, thrips, cutworms, codling moth, carrot root fly, cabbage root fly, onion fly, shore fly, caterpillars, and gooseberry sawfly.  Biological controls are a natural method of controlling pests, this treatment contains the natural predator of sciarid flies, a tiny nematode, which works to control their numbers effectively.

You can read all about Nemasys® Biological Fruit and Veg Protection in this article I wrote about this treatment, showing the step-by-step application process, here.

Snails

There are a large number of tiny snails residing in this Rainforest Terrarium.  I use slices of cucumber very effectively to attract and then remove snails from my terrariums.  Although, I must tell you that I have not been as pro-active with my cucumber slices as usual lately, and so the number of snails inside my Rainforest Terrarium has grown accordingly.

As I write to you today, my Rainforest Terrarium is currently decorated with slices of cucumber.  I am all set and ready to entice this terrarium’s snails away from my orchids and out of this terrarium.  If you struggle with snails or slugs inside your terrarium, I can heartily recommend my cucumber method!

Rainforest Terrarium Growing Conditions

This chart shows the minimum and maximum temperature levels inside my Rainforest Terrarium, from April 2018 to March 2019.
This chart shows the minimum and maximum humidity levels inside my Rainforest Terrarium, from April 2018 to March 2019.
This chart shows the average humidity levels and average temperatures inside my Rainforest terrarium, from April 2018 to March 2019.

You can find out more about the growing conditions inside this Rainforest Terrarium and the equipment I use inside this terrarium in this update, which covers the same eleven month period, from April 2018 to March 2019.

Orchid Updates

My Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 19th January 2019. Inside this terrarium, two Paphiopedilum orchids are in flower.

Here’s a look at how the orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium have been growing over the past eleven months:

Paphiopedilum

This Paphiopedilum is pictured on the 12th January 2019.

Well, I am getting off to a bad start, as I just cannot remember the name of this Paphiopedilum!  I have had this particular plant for at least four years now.  I introduced this Paphiopedilum orchid into my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, so as I write to you today, this plant has been growing inside this terrarium for eleven months.

This Paphiopedilum plant produced the lovely flower that you see here, in January 2019.  I had expected that I would remember this orchid’s name once the plant’s flower opened, but this flower has been open for some months now and I still cannot remember this Paphiopedilum plant’s name – sorry!  I’ll update this article with the correct name if and when I do remember.

Paphiopedilum flowering

This Paphiopedilum is pictured in bud, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 10th December 2018.
This Paphiopedilum is pictured in bud, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 10th December 2018.
This Paphiopedilum is pictured as its flower begins to open, on the 14th January 2019.

The fact that I’ve forgotten this Paphiopedilum’s name has not impacted on any of my enjoyment of this orchid’s flowering.  It has been lovely to see this slipper orchid in bloom.  This Paphiopedilum flower opened in mid-January 2019.  I write to you today in mid-March 2019, when this Paph’s flower is still in excellent condition.

This Paphiopedilum is pictured as its flower begins to open, on the 14th January 2019.
This Paphiopedilum is pictured as its flower begins to open, on the 14th January 2019.

I’ve not noticed any scent from this Paphiopedilum’s flower.  It has been lovely to have this Paphiopedilum bloom brightening up my Rainforest Terrarium, over the past few months.

This Paphiopedilum is pictured as its flower begins to open, on the 14th January 2019.
This Paphiopedilum is pictured as its flower opens, on the 14th January 2019.
This Paphiopedilum was photographed on the 19th January 2019.
Paphiopedilum in flower, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Paphiopedilum in flower, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.

Paphiopedilum concolor

Paphiopedilum concolor, as pictured on the 28th January 2019.

This Paphiopedilum concolor specimen was one of the first plants to flower inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  These first pictures of this orchid species that you see listed here for this update were taken this year – in 2019 – many months after April 2018, when this Paphiopedilum concolor specimen was first introduced to this terrarium.  I’ve dated every photograph in this update, to make it easier for you to follow each plant’s growth and development.

Paphiopedilum concolor, as pictured on the 28th January 2019.

This Paphiopedilum concolor specimen was first introduced to my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2019, so as I write to you today, this plant has been growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium for eleven months.

As you can see, this Paphiopedilum concolor specimen has produced some lovely new, mottled green leaves since this plant was introduced to this enclosure.  This Paphiopedilum concolor plant’s leaves are really quite large, they stretch out over quite a wide distance.  Like the other Paphiopedilum plants that are featured in this article, this is not a plant to try to contain inside too small a terrarium.

Paphiopedilum concolor, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Paphiopedilum concolor, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Paphiopedilum concolor flowering

Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in bud, on the 8th May 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in bud, on the 8th May 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in bud, on the 16th May 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in bud, on the 16th May 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured as this plant’s flower was opening, on the 16th May 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured as this plant’s flower was opening on the 16th May 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in flower, on the 11th June 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in flower on the 11th June 2018.

I am afraid that I am quite helplessly in love with Paphiopedilum concolor‘s inflorescences!  These magnificent flowers are highlighted by a covering of very fine downy hairs.  Paphiopedilum concolor‘s blooms are rather attractively dotted and spotted with burgundy coloured markings, which perfectly compliment the inflorescences’ ivory colouring.

This Paphiopedilum concolor specimen’s flower began to open on the 16th of May 2018; this orchid’s bloom had faded by the middle of July 2018.

Paphiopedilum concolor, pictured in flower on the 11th June 2018.
Paphiopedilum concolor requires warm temperatures and a very humid environment to succeed. Pictured on the 2nd July 2018.

Paphiopedilum esquirolei

Paphiopedilum esquirolei, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

This Paphiopedilum esquirolei specimen was also introduced to this Rainforest Terrarium in April 2019 when this enclosure was first set up.  As I write to you today, this plant has been growing inside this enclosure for the past eleven months.

In the photographs I’ve added for you both above and below, you might be able to see the roots that this Paphiopedilum esquirolei plant has pushed out horizontally, these roots stretch out and above the plant’s plastic pot, over the moss, and around the plant.  Please don’t ever be tempted to try to push these roots inside your orchid’s container.  I don’t think it would in anyway improve the appearance of your plant and regardless of the aesthetics, to do so would harm your plant and risk damaging or breaking your plant’s roots.  These aerial roots don’t wish to be inside the plant’s container, they are very happy where they are, these roots are helpful to this plant, they’re not something to be cut off or tidied up.

The conditions inside my Rainforest Terrarium have been a little too wet, for too long a time continuously, for this orchid to be really and truly happy.  This Paphiopedilum esquirolei specimen has coped admirably well inside my Rainforest Terrarium, but the plant’s leaves are yellowing and this plant has lost more leaves than I would have liked.  I plant to now improve the growing conditions for this Paphiopedilum.

Paphiopedilum esquirolei, as pictured in on the 6th July 2018.
Paphiopedilum esquirolei, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured in bud, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 10th December 2018.

This Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen initially thrived inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  It was wonderful to see this orchid in bloom – this Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen’s flower opened in December 2018.

In the second photograph that I’ve listed of this Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen (the picture below), you can look into my plant’s container, where you can see this plant’s growing medium.  This orchid’s bark based compost has broken down.  It’s important to re-pot orchids before their compost breaks down too extensively, as these orchids will only flourish when grown in a very open compost.  Speciality orchid composts create for large air spaces around the plant’s roots.  This Paphiopedilum needs a loose, free-draining compost.  Not a compost in the traditional sense of the word – not a soil based compost.  Instead, Paphiopedilums flourish when planted into compost comprised of large pieces of fir bark, tree fern, perlite, pumice, and moss, with dolomite lime, to create an open, coarse growing medium that allows air to circulate around the plant’s roots and water to run freely (and quickly) through and out of the plant’s container.

This Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen’s bark based compost was hastened in breaking down, speeded up by the high humidity and continually moist growing conditions found inside this Rainforest Terrarium over the past eleven months.

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum flowering

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured in bud, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 10th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured in bud, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 10th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured in bud, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 10th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured on the 14th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured on the 14th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured on the 17th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum is a beautiful orchid. This photograph was taken on the 20th December 2019.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured on the 20th December 2018.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured in flower, on the 14th January 2019.

This Paphiopedilum fairrieanum flower withered and faded in February 2019.

Paphiopedilum henryanum

Paphiopedilum henryanum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Paphiopedilum henryanum is an orchid species that originates from Vietnam and China.  This is a lithophytic orchid that grows on limestone rocks and cliffs.  In this orchid species’ natural environment, these Paphiopedilum plants enjoy warm temperatures and varying moisture levels: some months of the year are wetter or drier than others, so plants encounter a marked change in their growing conditions, through the year.

In contrast, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, the moisture levels are fairly constant from one month to the next.  I usually move orchids that experience distinct seasonal weather in the wild, into another enclosure, to allow these plants to experience different temperatures or growing conditions, for a similar period of time that would equate to the seasons in their native environment.  Most of the plants that are currently growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, which experience varied growing conditions in the wild, have remained in place, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, throughout the year.

I really need a couple more terrariums, so that I can more easily manage my plants and provide them with the varied conditions that these orchids encounter in their native environments.

Paphiopedilum henryanum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

I have had this Paphiopedilum henryanum specimen for a while now, this plant flowered beautifully in the autumn of 2017, but this particular Paphiopedilum has not flowered inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  One of the problems has been that this plant has been too wet, for too long a time.  This plant’s compost has also broken down, so this Paphiopedilum henryanum plant now needs re-potting in a fresh compost.

Paphiopedilum henryanum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured in on the 12th April 2018.
Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured in on the 6th July 2018.
Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Paphiopedilum hirsuitissimum is a medium sized Paphiopedilum species.  This orchid is another plant that has now been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for almost a year, this plant was first introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.

Paphiopedilum hirsuitissimum plants grow in a variety of places in the wild, they grow on limestone cliffs, as well as under trees and in leaf litter.  My home is not as warm as many of the places where Paphiopedilum hirsuitissimum orchids originates from.  Accordingly, the environment inside my Rainforest Terrarium does not reach the high temperatures that the plants that grow in the wild, in India, China, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and Myanmar, enjoy during the summertime.

This Paphiopedilum plant is looking OK.  I will keep an eye on this orchid and try to ensure that this plant is as happy and healthy, as possible.

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.
Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Phalaenopsis appendiculata

Phalaenopsis appendiculata, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.

This Phalaenopsis appendiculata specimen, was first introduced to this Rainforest terrarium in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this plant has now been growing inside this enclosure for almost a year.  As you can from my photographs above and below, this orchid has sadly declined since I introduced this plant to my Rainforest Terrarium.

This Phalaenopsis appendiculata specimen has struggled inside my Rainforest Terrarium, as this orchid species thrives in a very humid environment.  Phalaenopsis appendiculata plants flourish with continual humidity of 90%RH.  Sadly, this is another orchid that would have preferred to have received more frequent misting and more water, over the past year.

This Rainforest Terrarium is full of plants.  Accordingly, with a number of the larger plants shading others, some plants receive more water than others when this terrarium’s misting system operates.  It’s a process of tweaking the placement of each of the plants inside this Rainforest Terrarium, to create as close to optimum growing conditions for all of the plants inside this enclosure, as some plants wish to be grown wetter or drier than others.

I try to use the position of the plants positioned on a higher level, inside my Rainforest Terrarium, to the best advantage of the plants grown below.  I place orchids that delight in lower light levels, below any sun seekers, to try to create a healthy environment for every plant.  As you can see, I have some way to go yet, before I have achieved a perfect equilibrium inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

Phalaenopsis appendiculata, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
Phalaenopsis appendiculata, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

My Phalaenopsis appendiculata plant is in very poor condition.  I will endeavour to provide this Phalaenopsis appendiculata specimen with better care and more moisture.

If you’re interested in seeing another Phalaenopsis appendiculta plant, I have another plant which has been grown well and flowered successfully, please click here to see this orchid in bloom inside my Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis taenialis

Phalaenopsis taenialis, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.

This Phalaenopsis taenialis specimen is another plant that would appreciate a more humid environment and more frequent misting.  I am sure that given more moisture, more often, this Phalaenopsis taenialis specimen will produce more growth and new leaves and roots.  I’ve now made some adjustments to the equipment inside my Rainforest Terrarium to hopefully provide a healthier environment for all of the plants inside this enclosure.

Phalaenopsis taenialis, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.
Phalaenopsis taenialis, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis taenialis, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis chibae

Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured in bud, on the 2nd December 2018.

Phalaenopsis chibae orchids produce these really striking, dark coloured, glossy leaves, which contrast rather beautifully with this orchid species’ vibrantly coloured small flowers.  This particular Phalaenopsis chibae specimen is a young plant.  It was lovely to be able to enjoy this orchid’s flowers, when this plant bloomed earlier this year.

Phalaenopsis chibae blooms are small in size, but what these flowers lack in size, they make up for with their very bright colouring; this orchid species’ yellow and orange coloured flowers simply glow!

This Phalaenopsis chibae specimen was first introduced to my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, so as I write to you today, this plant has been growing inside this enclosure for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis chibae flowering

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis chibae specimen’s developing flower spike and root, as pictured in bud, on the 2nd December 2018.
Phalaenopsis chibae in bloom, as pictured on the 30th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis chibae in bloom, as pictured on the 30th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis chibae in bloom, as pictured on the 30th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis chibae in bloom, as pictured on the 30th January 2019.

It was really lovely to be able to enjoy this Phalaenopsis chibae specimen’s flowering inside my Rainforest Terrarium!  This plant’s first Phalaenopsis chibae inflorescence opened on the 30th January 2019.  This orchid species’ flowers don’t last very long; all of the flowers produced for this flowering had faded within two weeks.

Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.

Phalaenopsis cochlearis

Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 14th September 2018.

Phalaenopsis cochlearis is another orchid that was first introduced to this Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, which as I write to you today, was nearly a year ago.

This is a small sized orchid species, which originates from Borneo, Malaysia, and Indonesia.  Phalaenopsis cochlearis plants grow on limestone cliffs in the wild.  Inside my Rainforest Terrarium, this Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen is growing mounted onto a piece of bark.

Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 14th September 2018.

My Phalaenopsis cochlearis plant is in the process of producing a flower spike.  This flowering stem was in the earliest stages of production when I first introduced this orchid to my Rainforest Terrarium, so currently this flower spike, which has yet to flower, is over a year old.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 14th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen’s flower spike, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.

I have two Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ plants residing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  Both plants were introduced to this terrarium in April 2018.

The Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ plant that you see pictured above and below, is of flowering size; this plant has flowered inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  I’ve enjoyed seeing this orchid’s intermittent flowering inside my Rainforest Terrarium over the past eleven months; although it is some months since this particular plant last produced a flower.

This Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ plant (the plant that you see pictured above and below) is not looking quite as happy as I would like.  I suspect that this plant would have enjoyed some additional misting, on a number of occasions, over the past few months.  I will tweak this plant’s position, so as to hopefully provide the plant with better growing conditions and more appropriate care.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.

This second Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi specimen is looking very healthy and happy, but this plant has yet to flower inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  As you can see from my photographs, this Phalaenopsis has produced some beautiful new, strong and healthy roots over the past six months.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ flowering

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’., as pictured on the 22nd June 2018.

It’s so lovely to be able to share these fabulous Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ flowers with you!

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ produces ochre-lime green inflorescences that form along the plant’s flowering stems, where they open in succession, one after the other.
Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ produces ochre-lime green coloured inflorescences, which have an elegant, rather polished appearance. As pictured on the 29th June 2018.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’, as pictured on the 30th December 2018.

I have one Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’ specimen growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  This orchid is also a plant from a species known as Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi, but this is the red flowered form.

This orchid was introduced at the same time as the other orchids shown in this update – in April 2018.  So, this Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’ plant has been grown inside this enclosure for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’, as pictured on the 30th December 2018.

I think that this orchid species would have taken more enjoyment from its time inside this Rainforest Terrarium if I had provided a cooler night time temperature for a few months of the year.  This plant would have appreciated a cooler, drier winter rest period.

At other times, this Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’ specimen would have preferred more humid growing conditions inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  I will ensure that going forward this plant enjoys higher humidity and healthier growing conditions.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Red’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bud on the 8th May 2018.

I purchased this plant as Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’.  This orchid was introduced to my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, when this enclosure was first set up.  This Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen is a mature, flowering size plant, which has bloomed in previous years.  Nonetheless, it’s still always very exciting to see a plant in bud or in bloom, and I was delighted when this Phalaenopsis specimen’s first flower opened inside this Rainforest Terrarium, during June 2018.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s flower bud, as pictured on the 8th May 2018.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ flowering

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bud on the 19th June 2018.

This Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ plant is sporting some scorch marks on one of the plant’s older leaves.  These burn marks were visible and already present on this plant’s leaf when I received this Phalaenopsis plant in the post.  Some of this plant’s other leaves had already been damaged when I took possession of this plant.  Some orchids, such as plants from this particular Phalaenopsis species, don’t shed their leaves very often, so any damage caused to a leaf, remains visible for a very long period of time.  More importantly, a damaged leaf impacts the plant’s ability to photosynthesise.

Many orchids’ leaves can be scorched by receiving too intense a quality of light.  Orchids often crave that ideal, but illusive light quality – bright but indirect light.  Avoid placing your orchid in a location where harsh sunlight could scorch the plant’s leaves during the hottest part of the day, as this is when the sun’s rays are the most intense.

This Phalaenopsis plant relies on the supplemental lighting from my Skylight LED lights, as the room where my Rainforest Terrarium is housed, is very dark, so, these orchids really need supplemental lighting.  That isn’t to say that having LED lights means it is always easy to place an orchid within a terrarium, to provide your plant with the optimum amount of light – hopefully this update highlights the fact that not all orchids are easy to grow.  This might be something that you want to bear in mind, if you’re considering placing an order for a rare or endangered plant.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s developing flower buds, as pictured on the 19th June 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s flower buds, as the first flower opened on the 20th June 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s flower spike, as pictured on the 21st June 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s flower spike, as pictured on the 21st June 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 25th June 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 25th June 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 29th June 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s flower buds, a flower as it opens alongside two open flowers, as pictured on the 29th June 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 6th July 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 6th July 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 6th July 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ pictured on the 17th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ pictured on the 17th August 2018.

This Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s flowers faded in October 2018.  We won’t have too long to wait until this Phalaenopsis will be delighting us with its blooms again; as I write to you today, in March 2019, this Phalaenopsis equestris plant is currently in bud.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.

This Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen is a rather large specimen, this orchid species is too large to grow inside many terrariums.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s developing flower buds, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ in bud, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis fasciata

Phalaenopsis fasciata, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.

Well, here’s a sorry sight!  This Phalaenopsis fasciata specimen is in a regrettably poor state.  It makes me so sad to see this unhappy plant.  I am trying to rectify this plant’s problems and return the plant to a healthier condition.

Phalaenopsis fasciata, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
Phalaenopsis fasciata, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis fasciata, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis finleyi

Phalaenopsis finleyi, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

This Phalaenopsis finleyi specimen is growing well inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  I first introduced this Phalaenopsis plant to this Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, which as I write to you today was almost a year ago.  This plant has grown well, but I think this Phalaenopsis finleyi specimen now needs to move to a slightly lower position within this terrarium, as this orchid species favours a shader spot than the one I’ve provided it with.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

I have two Phalaenopsis gibbosa plants residing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  Both plants were first introduced to this enclosure in April 2018, which was almost a year ago now.  For the first six months or so following their introduction, both of these Phalaenopsis gibbosa plants flourished inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

Since then, despite my best efforts, sadly both of these Phalaenopsis gibbosa plants have been dehydrated and declined, which you can see in my next series of photographs.  Hopefully, both of these Phalaenopsis gibbosa plants will be looking brighter for my next update.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.
A closer look at Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
A closer look at Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
A closer look at Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.

I have two young Phalaenopsis honghenensis plants growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, both of these plants are young and have yet to flower.  I must tell you that in December 2018, one of these young Phalaenopsis honghenensis plants did come very close to flowering.  In December, one of these plants was in the process of producing its first flowering stem, but unfortunately, I accidentally knocked the stem while I was examining one the of the plants above this orchid.  I had hoped that this plant would have another go at flowering, but this has yet to happen.

Happily, these Phalaenopsis honghenensis plants are growing well, both of these plants appear to be healthy.  These Phalaenopsis honghenensis plants look to be receiving sufficient moisture.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.
A closer look at Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.
Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
A closer look at a developing Phalaenopsis honghenensis flower spike, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

There is just one Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis plant growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  Like the other plants that are featured in this update, this orchid was first introduced to this enclosure in April 2018, which as I write to you today, was almost a year ago.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis is a small to medium sized orchid species that originates from Sumatra.  This is an epiphytic orchid species, a plant that grows on trees.  Wild Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis plants can be found growing upon trees, in forested areas of central Sumatra.  My Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis plant, as you can see, is grown mounted onto a piece of cork bark.

This Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis plant is growing fairly well, this plant has produced new leaves and roots since it has been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, but this young plant has yet to flower.  I think that this Phalaenopsis plant would also appreciate a greater quantity of water and a more humid environment, inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  I am working to improve the growing conditions inside this enclosure.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.
Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis lindenii

Phalaenopsis lindenii pictured on the 17th August 2018.

I have two Phalaenopsis lindenii plants growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  Both plants were introduced in April 2018; so as I write to you today, these plants have been growing inside this enclosure for almost a year.

Unfortunately, I accidentally broke this Phalaenopsis lindenii flowering stem.  Thankfully a snapped flowering stem didn’t stop this plant from flowering!

Phalaenopsis lindenii flowering

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lindenii specimen’s flowering stem, in this picture you can see where this flowering stem was broken and it has now regrown. Pictured on the 17th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii flower buds, as pictured on the 25th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii flower buds, as pictured on the 25th August 2018.
A closer look at these Phalaenopsis lindenii flower buds developing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 5th September 2018.
A closer look at these Phalaenopsis lindenii flower buds developing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 5th September 2018.
This was the first Phalaenopsis lindenii flower to open. This photograph was taken on the 9th September 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lindenii flower, as pictured on the 9th September 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lindenii flower, as pictured on the 9th September 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lindenii flower, as pictured on the 9th September 2018.
This Phalaenopsis lindenii flowering stem has one open flower and three buds in various stages of development, as pictured on the 9th September 2018.
This Phalaenopsis lindenii specimen’s second flower opened on the 14th September 2018.
The second Phalaenopsis lindenii flower opened on the 14th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured on the 16th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured in bloom, on the 16th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured on the 16th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, pictured in bloom, on the 16th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
A closer look at a new Phalaenopsis lindenii leaf, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lindenii, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis lobbii

Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 19th June 2018.

I simply adore Phalaenopsis lobbii.  This is a super cute orchid species; it’s a Phalaenopsis that holds a special place in my heart.  Happily, I can tell you that I have two Phalaenopsis lobbii plants growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  Both of these Phalaenopsis lobbii specimens are growing comfortably inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

If you’re interested in this Phalaenopsis species, you might like to see my other Phalaenopsis lobbii plants.  I’ve grown Phalaenopsis lobbii plants inside my Orchidarium, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, and inside some of my other terrariums.

Phalaenopsis lobbii flowering

Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 2nd July 2018.

Both of my Phalaenopsis lobbii plants were introduced to this Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018.

Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 26th July 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in bud on the 4th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 6th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 7th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 11th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 11th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 12th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 12th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 12th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 12th August 2018.
A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis lobbii specimen’s flowers, as pictured on the 12th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii pictured in flower on the 12th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 17th August 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lobbii specimen’s flowers, as pictured on the 17th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 17th August 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lobbii specimen’s flowers, as pictured on the 17th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 17th August 2018.
A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis lobbii specimen’s flower’s faces, as pictured on the 17th August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.
These Phalaenopsis lobbii flowers are rather elderly here, in this photograph, which was taken inside my Rainforest Terrarium, on the 5th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 19th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 19th January 2019.

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

This Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia specimen was first introduced to my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, so as I write to you today, this plant has been growing inside this terrarium for almost a year.

Over the past eleven months, this Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia specimen has quite simply flourished inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia flowering

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 19th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 19th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 19th January 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

If you’re interested in Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, you might be interested to see my Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia plant that is growing inside my Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis lowii

Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.

Here’s another horror!  I am terribly sorry to see how sad and stressed this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen appears.  This plant was first introduced to my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, so as I write to you today, this plant has been residing inside this enclosure for almost a year.

I can see from the red leaf that this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen is displaying, that this plant would prefer to be grown in a more shaded position.  Earlier last year, this same plant was in fact positioned in a shadier position, within my Rainforest Terrarium, but the plant looked unhappy, so I thought I would move it to a slightly brighter spot.  My plan to improve this plant’s growing conditions didn’t work, as you can see, this orchid looks almost as unhappy as is possible.  I will endeavour to improve this plant’s growing conditions and improve the health of this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen’s leaf, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Here’s my second Phalaenopsis lowii specimen, this plant was also installed inside this Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018 – which as I write to you today was eleven months ago.  As you can see, this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen looks much healthier than the other Phalaenopsis lowii plant I showed you a moment ago.  However, this plant’s position within this Rainforest Terrarium and this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen’s health and condition can still be improved.

Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.

I purchased this this Phalaenopsis as Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana.  This Phalaenopsis specimen was introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis plant has been growing inside this terrarium for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana, as pictured on the 29th December 2018.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

As you can see from my photographs, this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana specimen is looking rather tatty and terribly dehydrated.  I will provide this plant with a soak in a bowl of water, followed by more frequent misting.  I hope that I will be able to improve this plant’s fortunes, health, and condition.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 11th June 2018.

This Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ plant was given to me by two very special friends in January 2018, so this plant means such a lot to me.

A closer look at the fading flower of Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 11th June 2018.

The photograph above shows this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen’s first flowering in my care.  Happily, this plant began to produce a new flowering spike last year.  I am so looking forward to seeing this plant’s next flowering.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.

NB.  The mark you see in the photograph above looks very much like a scale insect, happily it is not scale, it’s just a very similar looking mark.

A closer look at the roots and a developing flower spike belonging to this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
A closer look at the roots and a developing flower spike belonging to this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen, as pictured on the 2nd January 2018.
A closer look at the roots and a developing flower spike belonging to this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen, as pictured on the 2nd January 2018.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

I am still making adjustments to try to provide this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen with the optimum growing conditions.  I’ll keep tweaking the placement and care of all of these orchids until I get it right.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis

Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

I have one Phalaenopsis malipoensis plant growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant was first introduced to my Rainforest Terrarium in April 2018, so as I write to you today, this plant has been growing inside my terrarium for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis flowering

Phalaenopsis malipoensis, pictured in bud on the 9th October 2018.

I am still tweaking this Phalaenopsis malipoensis specimen’s growing conditions and care.  I was delighted that this Phalaenopsis malipoensis specimen flowered, but I am keen to improve the growing conditions for this plant.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis, pictured in bud on the 9th October 2018.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 2nd December 2018.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 2nd December 2018.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis malipoensis’ specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 2nd December 2018.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.
A closer look at Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 1st February 2019.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis malipoensis specimen’s developing flower buds, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on 3rd March 2019.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on 3rd March 2019.

Unfortunately, I accidentally banged this Phalaenopsis malipoensis flower spike when I was moving the plant and I knocked the lovely new flower bud off!  I wish I wasn’t so clumsy, but it won’t do the plant any harm to lose these buds, at least I didn’t snap the flowering stem this time!

Update: unfortunately I have since managed to drop this Phalaenopsis malipoensis plant and I’ve now bent, but not quite (yet) snapped this flowering stem at the base of the stem, where the stem first emerges from the plant.

Phalaenopsis pallens

Phalaenopsis pallens, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

Phalaenopsis pallens originates from the Philippines, where in the wild, plants experience a dry season.  However, this particular Phalaenopsis pallens specimen has not encountered a drier season.  This plant has remained inside my Rainforest Terrarium since April 2018, when this orchid was first introduced to this terrarium, eleven months ago.  Consequently, this Phalaenopsis has experienced growing in very consistent, constant growing conditions, inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

Phalaenopsis pallens, as pictured on the 2nd January 2019.
Phalaenopsis pallens, as pictured on the 2nd January 2019.
Phalaenopsis pallens, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis pallens, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis pallens roots, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis pantherina

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.

This Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen has quite simply flourished inside my Rainforest Terrarium!

The plant you see pictured here in this update, was a juvenile, small-sized plant when I first introduced this Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen to this enclosure, over eleven months ago.  Back in April 2018, when this orchid was first moved into to my Rainforest Terrarium, this plant had two or three leaves.  Over the past year, this plant has quite simply thrived, producing vast numbers of leaves, that hang rather decoratively from the piece of cork that this plant is mounted onto.

Phalaenopsis pantherina is a small sized orchid species.  This orchid is too large a plant to be considered for inclusion inside a regular sized terrarium.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.

Phalaenopsis pantherina in bud

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

I am over the moon to see how well this Phalaenopsis pantheriana specimen is growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium!  It’s exciting to see this Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen is currently in the process of producing a flower spike!  I am so looking forward to seeing this plant in bloom!

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba

Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 16th October 2018.

This Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen has quite simply flourished inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This particular plant was introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis plant has been growing inside this terrarium for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 31st December 2018.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen’s flowering stem developing, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.

I am so looking forward to seeing this Phalaenopsis parishii alba plant in flower!

If you’re interested in Phalaenopsis parishii, you might like to see my Phalaenopsis parishii plants that I’ve grown inside my BiOrbAIr Terrarium and inside my Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.

I have one Phalaenopsis pulcherrima specimen growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant was introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis plant has been growing inside this terrarium for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima is usually seen growing as a lithophytic or terrestrial orchid, although this orchid species could also be grown as an epiphyte, given the right care and conditions.

I’ve grown this Phalaenopsis pulcherrima plant in a plastic container, inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This Phalaenopsis pulcherrima specimen is growing well.

In the wild, this orchid species can be found growing near streams and rivers in Thailand, Vietnam, Borneo, Singapore, Sumatra, Laos, Malaysia, and Cambodia.  This orchid species grows in environments that I can only imagine.

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
A closer look at Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.

Phalaenopsis pulchra

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2018.

This Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen was introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis plant has been growing inside this particular terrarium for almost a year.  I have just one Phalaenopsis pulchra plant growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

I am glad to say that this Phalaenopsis pulchra plant has adapted well to the environment inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This orchid is growing well.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2018.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis stobartiana

Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

I have one Phalaenopsis stobartiana specimen growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant was first introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis plant has been growing inside this terrarium for almost a year.

Phalaenopsis stobartiana as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

I have enjoyed seeing the lovely new roots that this Phalaenopsis stobartiana plant has produced inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  I am hoping that this Phalaenopsis will produce more leaves and roots and will eventually flower inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 18th February 2019.
Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis wilsonii

Phalaenopsis wilsonii, as pictured on the 22nd August 2018.

I have one Phalaenopsis wilsonii specimen growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant was first introduced to this enclosure in April 2018, which as I write to you today was almost a year ago.

Over the first six to nine months that this orchid was grown inside this terrarium, this Phalaenopsis wilsonii specimen quite simply flourished inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  The plant produced many new roots and lots of lovely new leaves; this orchid looked to be both healthy and happy.

A month or so later, this Phalaenopsis wilsonii specimen’s leaves then took on a reddish hue.  I summarised that the plant may after all prefer to occupy a slightly more shaded position within my Rainforest Terrarium.

However, once I moved this Phalaenopsis wilsonii plant to a lower position within my Rainforest Terrarium, where the plant was further from this terrarium’s LED lights, I noticed that this plant was sheltered from receiving the water that’s sprayed by my automatic misting unit.  Consequently, this plant received less moisture than it would have liked.  This Phalaenopsis wilsonii specimen then dropped a number of its beautiful leaves.

I am now concentrating on providing this Phalaenopsis wilsonii plant with more hand misting, as I try to improve this plant’s fortunes.

Phalaenopsis wilsonii, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.
Phalaenopsis wilsonii, as pictured on the 12th March 2019.

To head straight to the next update for the Phalaenopsis and Paphiopedilum orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium, please click here.

Links to More articles

More articles about my Rainforest Terrarium

To discover the thinking behind the design of my Rainforest Terrarium and see this terrarium as it was first set up, please click here.

To see all of the articles I’ve written about my Rainforest Terrarium, please click here.

To find out about how the equipment inside my Rainforest Terrarium performed over the first eleven months following installation, please click here.

To find out how the Aerangis, Amesiella, and Angraecum orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium grew and developed over the first eleven months after they were introduced to this enclosure, please click here.

To see the full planting list for my Rainforest Terrarium, please click here.

Terrarium, Vivarium, and Orchidarium Trials

To see how my Orchidarium was created, please click here.

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To see a planting list of ferns, orchids, and other plants that are perfectly suited to growing inside terrariums and bottle gardens, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

To read how I track the temperature, humidity, and light conditions inside my terrariums, please click here.

Further Trials

You may be interested in some of the other trials I have conducted.

Compost Trial Reports

To see all of my Compost Trials, please click here.

To read advice on planting up containers, please click here.

Scented Daffodil Trial Reports

To see the results of my 2018 Scented Daffodil Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2018 Scented Daffodil Container Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2017 Scented Daffodil Trial, please click here.

Slug and Snail Trials

To see the results of my Slug and Snail Trial and discover the best methods of protecting your plants from slugs and snails, please click here.

To read about using nematodes to protect your plants from slugs and snails, please click here.

Sweet Pea Trial Reports

To read the results of my 2017 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2015 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

Tomato Trial

To read my Trial of New Tomato Varieties in full, please click here.

Vegetable Trials

To see all of my Vegetable Trials, please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

For edible gardening articles, please click here.

To read about the Queen of Orchids, the largest orchid in the world, please click here.

To read about the features of the 2017 BiOrbAir Terrarium, please click here.

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One thought on “An update on the Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium

  1. John

    December 21, 2023 at 10:47am

    Great block. I really enjoy the information about tge Phalaenopsis species.
    However, I have two comments regarding the Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’.
    I’m located in Europe and have never seen a plant labelled as such and I seriously doubt that this plant exists. It’s commonly referred to as either ‘Flava’/’Yellow’ due to the yellow colour of the flowers or ‘Alba’ even though it’s not white but describing the lack of anthocyanins.

    Another thing that I noticed was the incorrect terminology. A single flower is always called a flower. The structure consisting of the flowers and spike is an inflorescence. That was a bit confusing in the text about P. cornu-cervi ‘Green’.

    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      December 21, 2023 at 1:40pm

      Hello John

      Thanks for your message. I believe that Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi is the correct species for this plant. I tacked ‘Green’ on the end, as that was what the plant was sold as and because there is also a red flowered form, which was part of my collection at the time. I Have also seen these plants called Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Flava’.

      You’re absolutely correct, an inflorescence is the term reserved for a plant’s flowers and their spike. When talking about an individual flower I have (I am sure) made the mistake on numerous occasions of calling it an inflorescence. Forgive me.

      Merry Christmas!

      Best wishes
      Beth

      • John

        December 21, 2023 at 2:05pm

        Thank you very much for your reply!
        Merry Christmas!

        Best wishes,
        John

  2. John

    December 21, 2023 at 2:05pm

    Thank you very much for your reply!
    Merry Christmas!

    Best wishes,
    John

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