Phalaenopsis parishii and Phalaenopsis parishii alba – a super cute orchid species!

Phalaenopsis parishii alba

Let me introduce you to Phalaenopsis parishii alba, a miniature, epiphytic orchid species that originates from Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Assam, Burma, and the Himalayas.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba is the white flowered form of Phalaenopsis parishii.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba is the white form of Phalaenopsis parishii. These two orchids are pictured in bloom, on the 12th May 2019.

A closer look at an individual Phalaenopsis parishii flower, as pictured on the 12th May 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 4th May 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba growing conditions

In the wild, Phalaenopsis parishii can be found growing in humid areas.  This miniature orchid species produces flattened roots that nestle into the damp, moss laden branches, which overhang streams and ponds, in the areas where this plant makes its home.  Phalaenopsis parishii and Phalaenopsis parishii alba flourish in environments where the air is heavy and rich with moisture.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba, pictured in bloom, on the 12th May 2019. This plant is pictured with five open flowers and a flower bud that’s still developing.

However, the weather and growing conditions aren’t constant in Phalaenopsis parishii‘s homelands.  This orchid species is deciduous in the wild.  Plants drop their leaves during the wintertime, as a method of enabling these plants to survive a marked change in weather and the plants’ growing conditions.  Dropping the plant’s leaves enables this orchid species to endure the intensity of life through the sunny, dry season, which starts in November, and continues on through until February, each year.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba cultivation

Phalaenopsis parishii plants grown in cultivation usually have an easier time than plants that grow in the wild.  Cultivated plants tend to receive more constant growing conditions, enabling plants to retain their leaves throughout the year.  In fact, my Phalaenopsis parishii and Phalaenopsis parishii alba plants are all displaying leaves that are really rather scruffy and tatty in their appearance; most of my Phalaenopsis parishii plants’ leaves are at least three years old.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 3rd November 2017, inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

I’ve grown my Phalaenopsis parishii and Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimens inside many of my Trial Terrariums, including my long term review BiOrbAir, my Miniature Orchid Trial Terrarium, my Orchidarium, and my Rainforest Terrarium.

The Phalaenopsis parishii alba plant that you see pictured here, in this update, has been grown inside my Orchidarium, where this plant enjoys regular misting to maintain a humid environment inside this enclosure.  If you’re interested, you can find out more about this Phalaenopsis parishii alba orchid’s growing conditions, in this update, and the continuing articles that follow.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba flowers

The really exciting thing that I particularly wanted to tell you about, is that one of my Phalaenopsis parishii alba plants (I purchased this plant in April 2017), is now flowering for the very first time!  This Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen’s first ever flower opened on the 29th April 2019.  Currently this plant is displaying five open flowers; as I write to you today, there’s just one flower bud that is still developing and has yet to open.

This Phalaenopsis parishii alba plant was in poor condition when I received it, as the parcel that my plant was posted in, was lost in the postal system for a few weeks.  Thankfully, all’s well that ends well.  Two years after my purchase, this plant has now fully recovered, and I am now enjoying this Phalaenopsis parishii alba plant’s pretty blooms.

Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba flower buds developing, as pictured on the 4th May 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba scent

I’ve always read reports of Phalaenopsis parishii flowers being sweetly scented.  Unfortunately though, I’ve always been disappointed with my own plants, as none of my Phalaenopsis parishii or Phalaenopsis parishii alba plants have produced any scented flowers, that is until now.  I am so happy, as at last, one of my Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimens has actually produced fragrant flowers!  I don’t want to get your hopes up, this is not an orchid with a room filling fragrance, I’ve not been swept up in a potent cloud of delicious perfume, but I am really enjoying the scent that my Phalaenopsis parishii alba flowers deliver.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba, pictured in bloom, on the 12th May 2019. This plant has been flowering since the 29th April 2019.

I have always heard Phalaenopsis parishii flower’s scent described as being like lily of the valley, and I wholeheartedly agree, these plants’ fragrances are indeed very similar.  This is a sweet, but not cloying fragrance.  I’d describe this Phalaenopsis parishii alba‘s fragrance as being like the perfume of lily of the valley, mixed with just a hint of hyacinth and lemon blossom.  It’s not an overly sweet perfume, in fact it’s quite a tart, almost lemon – but not quite.  Phalaenopsis parishii alba‘s perfume is a little musky.  You need to have quite a close encounter with this orchid species’ flower to detect the plant’s perfume, but once your meeting has begun, you’ll discover Phalaenopsis parishii alba’s fragrance yourself.  I say this quite confidently, as every single one of my visitors over the past three weeks has enjoyed this orchid’s perfume.

A closer look at an individual Phalaenopsis parishii alba inflorescence, as pictured on the 12th May 2019.

I love this super cute orchid, it really is a dear little fellow; this plant holds a special place in my heart.  Phalaenopsis parishii and Phalaenopsis parishii alba are such darling plants, they’re really rather special orchids!  I am captivated by Phalaenopsis parishii and Phalaenopsis parishii alba‘s charming little flowers.  These inflorescences push their way forward, like friendly, smiling faces, ready to greet me, each time I visit their terrarium.

Other articles that may interest you…………..

To see photographs of the largest orchid in the world, please click here.

To read about Phalaenopsis honghenensis, please click here.

To see my Rainforest Terrarium being set up, please click here.

To see a planting list for terrariums, vivariums, and bottle gardens, please click here.

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