Orchids flowering inside my Orchidarium today!

Orchids flowering inside my Orchidarium today!

I designed this Orchidarium in 2017; it was constructed in the early spring of 2017.  If you’re interested in the materials I’ve used, you can see the step-by-step process of my Orchidarium build here.  I thought I’d share some of these pretty orchid blooms with you.  These orchids are all in bloom inside my Orchidarium, today.

Here are some of my orchid flowers that have opened this week.

Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta

I took some pictures earlier this week, so I could show you this Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta specimen, as its flowers opened.

Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta, as pictured on the 10th August 2019.

Orchid pests

You might be able to spot a few snails on the roots of this orchid.  I have a large tribe of pesky little snails that are living happily ever after, inside my Orchidarium!  The snails eat well; dining out on lush new leaf growth.  I collect these snails up whenever I can and relocate them.

A closer look at this Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta specimen’s developing flower buds, as pictured on the 10th August 2019.

I also have a colony of dastardly miniature aphids living inside this Orchidarium.  Aphids have sharp, piercing mouthpieces, which they use to puncture plant stems and leaves.  Their adapted mouthpieces allow the aphids to suck out and feast on the plant’s sap.  They take sustenance from the plant and weaken it, as they feed.

The aphids inside my Orchidarium have colonised the orchids, as well as the ferns, and the terrarium plants that are growing at the base of the planting, inside this enclosure.  I regularly spray the plants inside my Orchidarium, but these aphids are the tiniest I’ve seen, I can usually only spot them on a zoomed in photograph.  Due to their small, it’s easy for these aphids to hide under leaves, in cracks and crevices and escape the spraying.  As aphids reproduce so quickly, even one or two aphids can rapidly establish a large colony.  So far, I’ve been unable to eliminate these aphids, but the SB Plant Invigorator I use has allowed me to control them.

I hasten to add that none of these creatures are welcome guests.  I do not wish to trap any creatures inside my terrariums, least of all orchid pests!  In addition to the snails and aphids, I also have millipedes and bark lice living inside this Orchidarium.

Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta, as pictured on the 12th August 2019.

I love Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta!  This is a truly beautiful orchid species that originates from Kenya and Africa.  Plants produce pendant, arching flowering stems which are adorned with these very glamorous looking white flowers with red lipstick coloured centres.

A closer look at this Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta specimen’s newly opened flower and developing flower buds, as pictured on the 12th August 2019.

The Aerangis you see here has been growing inside my Orchidarium for a few years.  This is the plant’s third flowering.  Currently, my Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta specimen’s flowering stem measures 9cm (3.5 inches).  It’s all very well me giving you the measurements of my plants, but here’s a photograph I’ve taken of Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta with my husband’s thumb, to accurately show you the scale of this miniature orchid and its flowers.

Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.

Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta flowers are fragrant.  The flowers produce a light, delicate fragrance, which is sweet and very pleasing.  This is not an orchid that will fill a room with perfume, it really is a subtle scent.  You need a close encounter with Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta flowers to take in their perfume.

A closer look at this Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta specimen’s flowers and developing flower buds, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.

I enjoy watching Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta flower buds as they open.  The buds begin opening in a vertical position, facing forwards, before tilting and moving upwards to rest horizontally, where they remain, as the blooms open fully.

A closer look at this Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta specimen’s flowers, pictured as they opened, on the 15th August 2019.

If you’re interested in Aerangis luteoalba var. rhodosticta, you might enjoy reading this article I wrote about this particular orchid.

Oncidium hians

Oncidium hians in bloom, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.

Oncidium hians plants start life as miniature orchids, but once these plants are established, they soon become larger specimens that produce much taller flower spikes.  I’d class Oncidium hians as a miniature to small sized orchid species.  The plants themselves are quite small, but they do produce tall flowering stems.  I measured this Oncidium hians specimen’s taller flowering stem earlier today when it measures 36cm (14.2 inches).

If you’re interested, you can see this same Oncidium hians specimen’s first flowering in this update for my Orchidarium, in June 2018.  Here’s a closer look at one of this same Oncidium hians specimen’s flowering this week, in August 2019.

Here’s a closer look at one of this Oncidium hians specimen’s flowering stems. This bloom is pictured alongside Oncidium hians flower buds, which are still developing, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.

Phalaenopsis deliciosa and Phalaenopsis deliciosa var. alba

I’ve got both Phalaenopsis deliciosa and the white form, Phalaenopsis delciosa var. alba, in bloom inside my Orchidarium, today.  Phalaenopsis deliciosa and Phalaenopsis delciosa var. alba, orchid flowers both have a crystalline look and a bit of a sparkle, they’re so pretty!

A look at Phalaenopsis deliciosa and Phalaenopsis deliciosa var. alba flowers, as pictured on the 12th August 2019.

These Phalaenopsis delciosa and Phalaenopsis deliciosa var. alba specimens have produced a number of flowering stems, they all measure around 11cm (4.3 inches) long.

A closer look at a Phalaenopsis deliciosa var. alba flower, as pictured on the 12th August 2019.

Sadly, these Phalaenopsis deliciosa and Phalaenopsis deliciosa var. alba flowers are not scented, but these orchids are floriferous; each flowering stem produces many buds, with the flowers opening one after the other in sequence.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis deliciosa flower, as pictured on the 2nd August 2019.

A closer look at a Phalaenopsis deliciosa var. alba flower, as pictured on the 12th August 2019.

Phalaenopsis celebensis

Here’s a look at these Phalaenopsis celebensis flowers as they develop.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 30th April 2019.

Phalaenopsis celebensis, as pictured on the 27th May 2019.

Phalaenopsis celebensis, as pictured on the 29th June 2019.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 19th July 2019.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s flower spike, as pictured on the 31st July 2019.

Here’s this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s first flower opening, as pictured on the 12th August 2019. Here’s a fingertip, which is included to show the size of this orchid’s flowers.

Look how tall this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s flowering stem is!  This particular Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen has been growing inside my Orchidarium since October 2017, this is the plant’s first ever flowering.

Phalaenopsis celebensis, pictured in bloom on the 15th August 2019.

In case you’re wondering, this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s flowering stem measured 30cm (12 inches) when I examined and measured it today (16th August 2019).

This Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen has two flower buds that have aborted. You might be able to spot the failed buds, they are slightly shrivelled, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.

Phalaenopsis celebensis flowers look rather like a twirl of exotic butterflies or moths in flight.  The pure white flowers have a reflexed habit, with two petals – one at either side – bearing markings that resemble burnt caramel or the topping of a creme brûlée!  The column is a bubblegum pink colour.

So far, two flower Phalaenopsis celebensis buds have aborted.  Hopefully, the majority of the other buds you can see in these pictures, will open and flower successfully.

Here’s a closer look at this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s newly opened flowers and developing flower buds, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.

Even in bud Phalaenopsis celebensis is a handsome sight.  However, I do worry that it is only a matter of time until I snap this orchid’s flowering stem.  It’s almost a miracle that it is still intact.  This flowering stem first emerged in April 2019, the flowers are now opening, four months later.  It’s wonderful to be able to share the joy of these orchid flowers with you.

A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s newly opened flowers, as pictured on the 15th August 2019. Two petals on each flower look as if they have been made of caramelised sugar or Crème brûlée!

Other articles that may interest you………..

To see a planting list with orchids, ferns, and lots of plants that are ideally suited to growing in terrariums (complete with the details of the nurseries I have purchased my plants from), please click here.

To see the step-by-step process of my Orchidarium build, please click here.

To see the step-by-step process of my Rainforest Terrarium build, please click here.

To see my Madagascar Terrarium, please click here.

To see my White Orchid Trial, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

One thought on “Orchids flowering inside my Orchidarium today!

  1. Anne

    August 17, 2019 at 12:02am

    Awesome! You are so terrific with your mini garden. I love the delicate and adorable flowers.

    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      August 17, 2019 at 4:38pm

      Thank you, Anne. I am amazed that I have managed not to snap my Phalaenopsis celebensis flower spike yet! I hope you’re having a lovely weekend. Best wishes, Beth

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