The Results of my Moth Night, Moth Count

Moth Night 2019

Moth Night raises awareness about moths.  This annual event is a rather lovely invitation to everyone across the British Isles to stop for a moment and look out for moths – what moths are there in your neighbourhood, or your area of the country, this week?

The results from participants’ Moth Counts will inform Atropos, Butterfly Conservation, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, of the numbers of different moth species, in the UK, at this time of year.

This is a caddis fly I spotted on my Moth Night, Moth Count!

This is a Light Brown Apple Moth (also known by its scientific name of Epiphyas postvittana).

My Moth Night 2019 Moths

On Thursday 26th September 2019 I spotted these moths in my garden:

  • 5 Large Yellow Underwing Moths (also known by their scientific name of Noctua pronuba)
  • 2 Lunar Underwing Moths (also known by their scientific name of Omphaloscelis lunosa)
  • 1 Box-Tree Moth (also known by its scientific name of Cydalima perspectalis)
  • 1 Light Brown Apple Moth (also known by its scientific name of Epiphyas postvittana)
  • 1 Common Marbled Carpet Moth (also known by its scientific name of Dysstroma truncata)

I’ve been mad about moths and butterflies since I was a young child.  I am usually able to identify these insects myself without any problems whatsoever, but this morning I wasn’t certain of the identification of the brown moths I spotted, so my kind moth friends Antony Wren and Sarah Patton helped me to identify these moths.  I’d like to say a special thank you to Antony and Sarah!

Here are three of the Large Yellow Underwing Moths I spotted on my Moth Night, Moth Count. These moths are also known by their scientific name of Noctua pronuba.

Moths are often very well camouflaged.

This was my favourite of the moths I spotted last night. This is a Lunar Underwing Moth (also known by its scientific name of Omphaloscelis lunosa). I love how this moth looks as if it’s wearing a fur trimmed cloak.

This is the dark form of Box-Tree Moth; its wings display two distinctive white markings, (one more noticeable than the other) on each forewing.

Most Box-Tree Moths have white wings, with a neat brown outline.  Last night I spotted the melanic form.  This is a very pretty moth.  Both the white and the darker form – the one I spotted this morning – often display a gorgeous iridescent purple sheen over their wings – this moth is really quite something!

This attractive moth lays its eggs on box plants, (also known by their botanical name of Buxus sempervirens).  The caterpillars munch their way through the leaves of Buxus plants, camouflaged by their protective webbing.  I don’t recommend planting Buxus sempervirens, as these plants are susceptible to Box Blight, which can really ruin the appearance of a hedge.

This was my favourite of the moths I spotted last night. This is a Lunar Underwing Moth (also known by its scientific name of Omphaloscelis lunosa). I love how this moth looks as if it’s wearing a fur trimmed cloak – this specimen is a slightly paler shade than the other Lunar Underwing Moth I saw on this count.

Moth Night 2019 Dates

Don’t miss out – you’ve still got time to take a Moth Night, Moth Count – there are two nights left.  This year, Moth Night will be held on:

  • Friday 27th September 2019,
  • Saturday 28th September 2019.

Take Part

Anyone and everyone can take part in Moth Night.  You could take a Moth Count on any, or all of the three Month Night dates.  Although, if you’re doing more than one count, you may want to vary the area you take your Moth Count in – to avoid spotting the same moths.

If you plan on using a moth trap to take your Moth Count, then I would definitely advise you to take each Moth Count in different areas, as it’s unfair to risk catching the same moths for two or more nights running – as doing so runs the risk of preventing moths from successfully feeding, mating, or laying eggs.  I’d recommend always leaving at least 48 hours between each Moth Count taken using a moth trap, in the same area.  If you’re mad about moths – you could get together with your friends or family – to take a Moth Count at one another’s homes – to vary the location and take a Moth Count on consecutive evenings.

How to Submit Your Moth Night Results

To submit your Moth Night, Moth Count results, visit the Moth Night Homepage (here’s a link), click on the ‘submit records’ button (it’s on the right hand side of the page) and follow their instructions (if you don’t have an account, you simply register – it’s free and easy) to submit your moth sightings.  Thanks for taking part.

Moth Night is organised by Atropos, Butterfly Conservation, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

Other articles that may interest you…………

For information on the many different beautiful plants you can grow for moths, butterflies, bees, and other pollinating insects, please click here.

To see my photographs of the butterflies I spotted during the one of my Butterfly Counts, please click here.

To see photographs of the largest orchid in the world, please click here.

For step-by-step instructions on how to create a bottle garden or terrarium, please click here.

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