Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes

I feel a strong and passionate desire to protect our planet’s peat bogs.  This is an urgent matter, it’s not something we can keep putting off to consider again in the future, at a more convenient time – for the peat that is being extracted now can’t be saved and so if we continue as we have done in the past, the opportunities we have in our hands, right in front of us now, will be lost forever.

We don’t have much time remaining.  Peat bogs and peatlands are precious environments that are estimated to cover just 2-3% of our planet’s surface.  Our peat bogs have been butchered and plundered.  Consequently, we only have the fragments of the peatlands that remain – many of which are fractured and in extremely poor condition.  We need to act now, if we’re to ensure that our remaining peat bogs and peatlands will survive.

Last year, I grew a range of cherry, small, medium sized, and larger plum tomato plants. I took this photograph of the Trial on the 1st September 2019.

It breaks my heart that no one has stepped forward to stop this tragedy, but the fact is that together we can stop this.  We must use our power for good to prevent the remaining peatlands and peat bogs being destroyed.  If none of us order or purchase peat based composts, companies will recognise this and they’ll stop stocking and selling these composts.  We should protect the peatlands that remain and conserve and treasure these environments.

It’s utterly mad that peat based composts are still being produced and are widely purchased by gardeners.  A peat based compost is not necessarily a better compost than a peat-free compost.  In fact, depending on the plants that you’re growing, a peat based compost might actually be a worse choice of growing media for your plants.

I’m keen to raise awareness about the best quality peat-free composts.  I want to help you grow fabulous plants in your gardens and allotments.  Every year, I run Compost Trials to discover the finest peat-free composts on the market.  I love finding top performing composts to recommend to you, to help you improve your harvests.

I grew these ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants while I was trialling Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes. Pictured on the 1st September 2019.

Last year, I trialled Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes for the first time.  This compost is a complete all-in-one organic, peat free compost and fertiliser.  I didn’t use any type of fertiliser during this Compost Trial, as Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes contains all the nutrients your tomato plants need.  During this Compost Trial, I grew my tomato plants from seeds; these plants received all of their nutrients from the composts in which the plants were grown.

In 2018, I grew my ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants in containers of Dalefoot Composts Double Strength Wool Compost (these seeds were sown in containers of Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Seeds; then the seedlings were potted on into containers of Dalefoot Composts Wool Potting Compost.  Finally, these tomato plants were potted into containers of Dalefoot Composts Double Strength Wool Compost.  No fertiliser was used.)

In 2019, I trialled growing my ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants in containers of Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes (these seeds were sown in containers of Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Seeds; then the seedlings were potted on into containers of Dalefoot Composts Wool Potting Compost.  Finally, these tomato plants were potted into containers of Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes.  No fertiliser was used.)

I was delighted to discover that the harvest of my container grown ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants improved by 256% in 2019, when I used Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes!  Naturally other factors, for example the weather and temperatures the tomato plants experienced each year were different.

While I found the harvest from the ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants that were grown in the ground and mulched with Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes had their harvest improved by 54% in 2019 (Compared to the harvest achieved by my ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants in 2018 – when the plants were mulched with Dalefoot Composts Double Strength Wool Compost).

I enjoy growing cherry, small, medium sized, and larger plum tomatoes. Last year I trialled Dalefoot Composts Tomato Compost for the first time. I took this photograph of the Trial on the 30th August 2019.

Last year, I sowed my tomato seeds in Dalefoot’s Wool Compost for seeds.  It’s still too early to sow tomato seeds outside, but you can sow tomato seeds on a bright and sunny window sill or inside your glasshouse or polytunnel, now.  As usual, I sowed my tomato seeds and started my tomato plants off inside my Access Garden Products Exbury Classic Growhouse.

I took this photograph of some of my ‘Honeycomb’ and ‘Purple Ukraine’ tomatoes, on the 25th August 2019.

When my tomato plants developed their true leaves, I potted my plants up into containers filled with Dalefoot Composts’ Wool Potting Compost.  The tomato plants grew in these pots for a little while; before being planted into containers filled with Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes.

There are so many advantages of using Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes; you don’t need to worry about using any fertiliser or plant food – Dalefoot Compost Wool Compost for Tomatoes has been designed to give your tomato plants all the nutrients they need.  Like Dalefoot’s other composts, this is a water retentive compost, that won’t need as much watering as standard peat-free compost.

Dalefoot Composts have launched a new compost – Dalefoot Wool Compost for tomatoes – a peat free compost made from natural organic ingredients including wool and bracken. I’ve been testing this compost this year, this is a water retentive compost that contains all the nutrients tomatoes need for healthy growth. There’s no need to use any additional fertiliser, just water when the compost becomes dry.

If you’re growing tomatoes, I’d recommend Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes.

Other articles that may interest you……….

Wondering how to protect your seedlings from slugs and snails?  The results from my Slug and Snail Trial will help you.

If you’re interested in my Compost Trials, you can find all of the articles I’ve written about my Compost Trials, here.

Have you seen my Vegepod?  Here’s a link to an article I wrote about this container garden.

Here’s a link to the article I wrote about my Tomato Trial.

If you’re interested in finding out about my glasshouse, here’s a link to the article I wrote about my mini glasshouse.

Are you looking for the best quality, strong twine to use to train your tomatoes, cucumbers and other fruit and vegetables? You might be interested in seeing the strongest twines from my Twine Trial – here’s a link.

Other articles you might like:

One thought on “Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost for Tomatoes

  1. LisaG

    April 17, 2020 at 11:36pm

    Hi, I really am really shocked that so much compost still contains peat. And I was surprised when talking with people that they assume unless it says “peat” in large letters on the packaging, it is peat free: sadly not so!

    Like many gardeners, I am looking for the best way to get crops with the least environmental impact, so I decided to make this version a go for all my toms this year. Mine will be planted into quadgrows in the greenhouse, and I am excited to assess them as the season gets under way.

    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      April 18, 2020 at 10:08am

      I know, it is difficult. Many gardeners buy peat based composts but because the composts’ packaging gives the illusion that it’s a ‘green’ or environmentally friendly product they believe it.

      I wish you good luck with your tomatoes, Lisa. I hope you have a productive season ahead.

      Warmest wishes
      Beth

  2. Jacqueline Palmer

    May 12, 2020 at 8:01am

    Hi
    having read your article about Dalefoot compare, I have been using it for my tomatoes and vegetables this year. But I am finding that my tomatoes, in particular the sun gold are growing quite leggy, with very large leaves, and not that many bracts. But maybe this is normal as they are growing in this particular compost.
    Any advice welcome!
    Thank you

    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      May 12, 2020 at 8:40am

      Hello Jacqueline

      Are your tomatoes growing inside a glasshouse? I expect your plants have become leggy as they’re not receiving enough carbon dioxide – make sure you open the doors in your glasshouse to ventilate your plants during the daytime and close the vents, doors and windows in the evening.

      The day and night time temperatures your plants experience will also affect the growth of your plants.

      Of course, your tomato plants could also be growing in too shaded an area, their growth has become extended as they’re growing towards a window rather than growing towards sunlight above.

      When you’re next potting on/planting out your plants, you can plant your tomato plants deeply, so that the lower part of their stems are covered with compost – the stems will root.

      I hope these ideas will help you.

      I wish you every success with your tomatoes.

      Best wishes
      Beth

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