An update on the Paphiopedilum & Phalaenopsis orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium (part two)

Rainforest Terrarium Update (part two)

Since my last Rainforest Terrarium update, I’ve been busy conducting a huge rearrangement of many of my terrariums and terrarium plants.  As part of these changes, some of the orchids that used to reside inside my Rainforest Terrarium have now been moved to other enclosures, including my new Tall Orchidarium.

My Rainforest Terrarium, as pictured on the 3rd May 2019. Inside this terrarium, Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, Aerangis hariotiana, Phalaenopsis ‘Lobbii’ are in flower.

I am full of ideas of terrariums I’d like to create.  I’d like to make some considerable changes, including moving the plants that favour wetter conditions out of my Rainforest Terrarium and into another terrarium with more frequent misting.  But I’ve had to put my plans on hold for the moment, as I don’t have the kit I need to create another new enclosure.

My Rainforest Terrarium, as pictured on the 3rd May 2019. Inside this terrarium, Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, Aerangis hariotiana, Phalaenopsis ‘Lobbii’ are in flower.

What changes have I made since my previous update?  Last autumn, I changed the appearance of my Rainforest Terrarium, by installing huge sheets of cork to cover the sides of this enclosure.  My Rainforest Terrarium orchids are mostly mounted onto individual pieces of cork, which I’ve hooked onto the slabs of cork that now surround the back and sides of this terrarium.  The majority of my plants are hooked onto the cork but there are also a few plants hanging from rubber suction cups, which I’ve stuck to the sides of the glass.  There are also plants growing at the base of this terrarium, many of these plants are switched around – moving from the base of my Rainforest Terrarium to then enjoy a dryer period of rest on a table in a shaded area of my home.

My Rainforest Terrarium, as pictured on the 3rd February 2020.

I didn’t design this terrarium to be beautiful; I created this enclosure to house as many orchids as possible.  But I’m happy to say that I much prefer the look of this terrarium now I’ve added the cork.  What do you think?  Do you like it?

Rainforest Terrarium growing conditions

Usually I publish my update on the equipment and growing conditions inside this terrarium first.  However, I’ve changed my publishing order, as I’ve experienced some problems with my equipment inside my Rainforest Terrarium recently, which has resulted in the conditions inside this enclosure being wetter than I would have liked.  This has suited the plants that thrive in continually wet conditions, but it is not the growing conditions I planned for this enclosure and will not benefit the majority of these plants, especially my Paphiopedilum, long term.  I’ll publish an equipment update with more information, in due course.

Why I set up this Rainforest Terrarium

In March 2018, I commissioned Rich, from Rainforestvivs (now The Rich Rainforest), to build this fabulous, custom built Rainforest Terrarium for me.  I designed my Rainforest Terrarium to fulfil my requirements: I needed to provide an enclosure that would house as large a number of orchids as possible from my National Collection of Miniature Aerangis and Angraecum Species and my National Collection of Miniature Phalaenopsis Species, within the limited space I had available.  I wanted to provide the plants growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium with automatic plant care and I also needed this custom built terrarium to be flexible enough to accommodate my future growing needs and allow for any potential changes in the equipment I use in the future.

Rainforest Terrarium updates

If you’re interested, you can read all about the thinking behind my design for this Rainforest Terrarium, in my step-by-step guide to the set up of this Rainforest Terrarium.

This is my Rainforest Terrarium as pictured on the 2nd August 2018, inside this terrarium, Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ is in flower, and Aerangis calantha, Aerangis punctata, and Phalaenopsis lobbii, are in bud.

My Rainforest Terrarium was delivered to me in April 2018.  The updates I’ve written about the plants and equipment inside this Rainforest Terrarium are extensive and feature lots of details and photographs.  Consequently, I have divided my updates up, so as to make each part more manageable.

If you’re interested in my Rainforest Terrarium, you’ll find all of my Rainforest Terrarium articles, if you click this link – here.

While this article – the one that you’re reading now – covers the Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis orchids that were growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, from March 2019 to April 2020.

Directions for using this update:

Naturally, you can read this article as a whole if you wish to, but if you’re looking for information about a particular orchid species you might want to adopt a different tact.  At the top of this update, there’s a list of contents written in red text.  I’ve included this feature, to make it easier for you to find information about a particular plant – simply click on one of the headings, to whizz directly to a particular section of this article.

To save time scrolling back up to the top of the page, simply click on the arrow: you’ll find it on the right hand side of the page – if you click on this arrow, to be directed back to the beginning of this update – at the top of the page.

Rainforest Terrarium Planting List:

As of April 2020, the following plants are currently growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium:

  • Aerangis biloba
  • Aerangis calantha
  • Aerangis equitans
  • Aerangis fastuosa
  • Aerangis fuscata
  • Aerangis hariotiana
  • Aerangis kirkii
  • Aerangis luteo-alba var rhodosticta
  • Aerangis modesta
  • Aerangis mystacidii
  • Aerangis punctata
  • Aerangis spiculata
  • Amesiella minor
  • Amesiella monticola
  • Angraecum aloifolium
  • Angraecum bancoense
  • Angraecum compactum
  • Angraecum didieri
  • Angraecum distichum
  • Angraecum elephantinum
  • Angraecum equitans
  • Angraecum pyriforme
  • Angraecum rutenbergianum
  • Masdevallia rechingeriana
  • Paphiopedilum fairrieanum
  • Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum
  • Phalaenopsis celebensis
  • Phalaenopsis chibae
  • Phalaenopsis cochlearis
  • Phalaenopsis finleyi
  • Phalaenopsis gibbosa
  • Phalaenopsis honghenensis
  • Phalaenopsis lobbii
  • Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia
  • Phalaenopsis lowii
  • Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’
  • Phalaenopsis malipoensis
  • Phalaenopsis micholitzii
  • Phalaenopsis parishii
  • Phalaenopsis parishii alba
  • Phalaenopsis pulcherrima
  • Phalaenopsis pulchra
  • Phalaenopsis stobartiana
  • Phalaenopsis taenialis

You can discover more details and see photographs of all of the plants that are growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium in my Rainforest Terrarium Planting List.  This list has information about all of the plants that are currently growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium; it also includes details of any plants that have been grown inside my Rainforest Terrarium in the past.  Rest assured, that any plants I introduce to my Rainforest Terrarium in future will also be added to this list.

My Rainforest Terrarium, as pictured on the 3rd February 2020.

I’ve included the details all of the nurseries and suppliers where I have purchased my plants, cork, and moss – you’ll find this information at the bottom of my planting list.

Fertiliser

On the 15th September 2018, I changed the fertiliser that I used for my orchids.  I was happy with the fertiliser that I was using before (Orchid Focus Grow and Orchid Focus Bloom), but I was keen to try Akerne Orchids Rain Mix, as I wanted to find out more about this product.

In March 2019, I decided to switch back to using Orchid Focus Grow for my orchids that are actively growing and Orchid Focus Bloom for my orchids that are in bud or in flower.  I’ve been using Orchid Focus as fertiliser since March 2019 – I’m very happy with this fertiliser.

Rainforest Terrarium Insects and Pests

Ants

Last autumn (2019), I purchased some large sheets of cork, which came complete with a colony of Crematogaster scutellaris ants – ants that are not a UK native species.  I’m happy to report that I’ve not seen any ants for a couple of weeks, but I have ant traps set up – to contain any ants that remain.  I’ve written an article about the ants, with lots of helpful tips for using cork, here’s a link.

Millipedes

Goodness knows how many millipedes are now residing inside my Rainforest Terrarium!  I expect that very young millepedes were concealed inside the mosses I bought for this enclosure.  Certainly I’ve been aware of millipedes inside this terrarium for what feels like a long period of time.  The sight of millipedes mating is a common one, so the millipede numbers are undoubtedly on the rise!

I spotted these millipedes on my Aerangis fastuosa plant’s cork mount, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.

Naturally there are countless millipede droppings being deposited on and around the orchids that are growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, which isn’t a nice thought!  The droppings also change the growing conditions for the orchids inside this enclosure, as the plants’ roots naturally become smeared with millipede poo.  Some plants are happy being fertilised with millipede droppings, but it’s not beneficial for orchids who would prefer improved air circulation around their roots.

Snails

As well as millipedes, there are vast numbers of tiny snails residing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  I use slices of cucumber to attract and then remove snails from my terrariums.  Although, I have not been pro-active with my cucumber slices as lately, and so the number of snails inside my Rainforest Terrarium have grown accordingly.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

If you struggle with snails or slugs inside your terrarium, I can certainly recommend my cucumber method; it’s very effective and allows you to easily gather up any mollusks you find.

Spider mites

In April 2019, I realised that an increasing number of spider mites on the orchids and other plants that are growing inside my Orchidarium.  To remedy this, I purchased some biological controls from Defenders.  Although I hadn’t seen any real evidence of spider mites inside this Rainforest Terrarium, I decided to treat both terrariums at the same time.  I purchased Phytoseiulus, a mite – a natural, spider mite predator.

Phytoseiulus persimilis are the natural predator of red spider mites.

My small parcel of biological controls from Defenders, arrived via Royal Mail, on 9th May 2019.  I added the Phytoseiulus persimilis mites to my Rainforest Terrarium and my Orchidarium, the same day they arrived in the post.  If you’re looking for more information and helpful tips on how to control spider mites, please click here.

Paphiopedilum plant care and growing conditions

Paphiopedilum compost

The Paphiopedilum plants that I’ve planted at the base of this Rainforest Terrarium have all been planted in plastic containers and surrounded with moss.  Each Paphiopedilum’s container is filled with a speciality orchid compost, which is comprised of large pieces of fir bark, perlite, pumice, and moss, with dolomite lime, to create an open, coarse growing medium that allows air to circulate around the plant’s roots and water to run freely (and quickly) through the plant’s container.

Previously, these Paphs’ pots were all surrounded by coir compost, which was topped with moss.  Since my last update, the coir compost has been removed and replaced with leca.  The moss was then popped back on top of the leca.

The plants are watered by the automated misting unit that operates inside the Rainforest Terrarium.  The water runs through the bottom of each plant’s plastic pot, into the reservoir below.  The water from the reservoir at the base of my Rainforest Terrarium is drained about one a month.  Draining the excess water is a simple procedure, using a tube that I put in place when this terrarium was first set up.

Growing conditions for the Paphiopedilum orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium

None of the Paphiopedilum plants inside my Rainforest Terrarium are ever sitting in water, but I feel that most of these plants have been grown in wetter conditions than they would have chosen over the past few months.  This has happened in part as I have a number of orchids, namely: Aerangis fastuosaAerangis equitans, and Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana, which have required a far greater quantity of water that the other orchids that reside inside this Rainforest Terrarium.  I have been hand misting these orchids to provide the extra moisture they need.  I will eventually move the orchids that require additional misting into another terrarium dedicated to plants that favour wetter growing conditions, as and when I can.

If you’re interested, you can find out more about the equipment I use inside my Rainforest Terrarium, in the article I wrote describing how I set my Rainforest Terrarium up.  You’ll find more information in my update that details how this equipment performed over eleven months– from April 2018 to March 2019.  A follow up article detailing how the equipment inside my Rainforest Terrarium has performed from March 2019 to April 2020, will be published in due course.

If you’re looking for all of the articles I’ve written about my Rainforest Terrarium, you can find them all here.

My Rainforest Terrarium, as pictured on the 3rd February 2020.

Misting Paphiopedilum plants

I provide particular plants with additional hand misting as and when required.  In addition to the hand misting, which is tailored to individual plant needs (and weekly time restraints), I provide all of the plants inside this Rainforest Terrarium with a twice daily automated misting service, thanks to my MistKing misting system: the misting unit operates once, for 1 minute 30 seconds, at 8.30am, and again, for 30 seconds, at 12.30pm (lunchtime).

My Paphiopedilum plants appreciate and flourish in the humidity that my automatic misting system provides.  Although, I am concerned that this frequent misting creates an additional layer of moisture which falls onto the Paphs, delivering more water than most of these plants require.  As my Paphiopedilum plants are grown in plastic containers, which are planted into a mossy area, at the base of my Rainforest Terrarium, the plants’ roots have almost continuous access to moisture, as the moisture here, below the moss, cannot evaporate as easily as the moisture around the roots of my mounted orchids.  The Paphiopedilum plants’ roots do not dry out in the same manner or speed that the roots of my plants that are grown mounted on pieces of cork.

Improving the growing conditions for the Paphiopedilum orchids

A shorter burst of mist, more often, would suit my Paphiopedilum plants more than the set up I have created here.  This is one of the difficulties that can arise when orchids that are best cultivated using different methods or plants that require contrasting moisture levels are grown together.

When I was setting up this terrarium, I hoped to unite these orchids, by utilising the different areas and equipment inside this Rainforest Terrarium to create optimum growing conditions for each of the orchids that reside inside this enclosure.  I have quite a way to go until I reach this point.  Over the past year, I’ve been moving my Paphs around, so they have spent a short while inside my Rainforest Terrarium and then move to my window sill or table and then move back into my Rainforest Terrarium for a short while, before taking an extended stay on my window sill.  I have lots of ideas of ways that I can improve the growing conditions for these Paphiopedilums and I have some ideas of other plants that I could trial inside this enclosure; I’ll let you know how the plants grow and develop in my next update.

Self-seeded ferns

I always find self-seeded ferns growing inside my Terrariums.  To help to counteract the excess moisture at the base of my Rainforest Terrarium and create more favourable growing conditions for my Paphiopedilum orchids, I have allowed the self-seeded ferns to grow in amongst these plants.  Once the ferns grow too large in size, I remove them.  I then allow any new ferns seedlings to grow up and take their place.

Orchid Updates

Here is a look at the Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis orchids that are growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium…………….

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum 

I took this photograph of my Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen’s flower bud on the 18th November 2019.

This Paphiopedilum fairrieanum plant has been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for two years.  This plant is not a continuous resident – often I move it to my window sill or table, as the automatic misting would otherwise result in this Paph’s compost becoming too wet.

I repotted this Paphiopedilum fairrieanum plant on the 1st February 2019, using a blend of large pieces of fir bark, perlite, pumice, and dolomite lime.

Paphiopedilum fairrieanum flowering

I took this photograph of my Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen’s flower on the 5th December 2019.
Here’s a closer look at this Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen’s flower, as pictured on the 5th December 2019.
Paphiopedilum fairrieanum, pictured in bloom on the 24th December 2019.
A closer look at this Paphiopedilum fairrieanum specimen’s inflorescence, as pictured on the 24th December 2019.

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum is another orchid that switches between growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium and spending time on a table, in a shaded area of my home.  Originally, this Paph was grown continually inside my Rainforest Terrarium for over a year, but over the past few months this orchid has spent an increasing amount of time on my table.

I was so happy to see this lovely new bud appear!  I’m so looking forward to seeing this orchid in bloom.

Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis taenialis

Phalaenopsis taenialis, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Rest in peace, Phalaenopsis taenialis.

Phalaenopsis celebensis

Phalaenopsis celebensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

As I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen has been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for a year.

This Phalaenopsis species is very happy growing in the shade.  My Phalaenopsis celebensis plant is positioned at the bottom of my Rainforest Terrarium, where it’s shaded by the leaves of the plants that are growing above.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis celebensis specimen’s leaf, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis celebensis produces these fascinating leaves; they’re an incredible silvery blue colour and are decorated with chocolate maroon splotches and finished with a fantastic shine!

Phalaenopsis celebensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis chibae

Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

This Phalaenopsis chibae specimen has been growing successfully inside my Rainforest Terrarium since April 2018.  So as I write to you now in April 2020, this Phalaenopsis chibae specimen has been growing inside this enclosure for two years.

I’m always struck by how incredibly reliable this Phalaenopsis species is  – this Phalaenopsis chibae specimen’s first flower of the year opened on the exact same date this year, as last year!

Phalaenopsis chibae flowering

Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

The mini snails that reside inside my Rainforest Terrarium are particularly fond of Phalaenopsis chibae.

Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 31st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 31st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 31st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 31st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 3rd February 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 3rd February 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 3rd February 2020.
Phalaenopsis chibae, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Snails have caused some significant damage to this Phalaenopsis chibae plant over the past few months.  Hopefully this plant will produce a lovely new leaf very soon.

Phalaenopsis cochlearis

My Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen in bud, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.

As you can see, my Phalaenopsis cochlearis plant looks a sorry sight.

This Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen has been in the process of producing a flower spike for a considerable period of time.  I first noticed that this Phalaenopsis specimen was in the earliest stages of producing a flowering stem, back in January 2018 – which was almost two years ago.

My Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen in bud, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.

I’d expected this apologetic looking plant to abort its flower spike, but it has persisted, which is rather admirable in the circumstances.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen’s developing flowering stem, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.

For an absolute age, this Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen has looked rather shrivelled.  The plant hadn’t produced any new roots in a considerable amount of time, which has concerned me greatly.

Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 21st April 2020.

Thankfully, in April 2020, this Phalaenopsis cochlearis plant has at last started producing some new roots.  Hooray!

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis cochlearis specimen’s roots, as pictured on the 21st April 2020.
Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

Here’s another Phalaenopsis cochlearis plant that I’m also growing inside this enclosure.  This one is a rescue plant that’s recovering nicely.

Phalaenopsis cochlearis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’

Since my last update, I’ve now moved this particular Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen into my new Tall Orchidarium.  This Phalaenopsis was growing inside this Rainforest Terrarium from April 2018 until December 2019.  As you’ll see in my photographs, this plant was flowering well and grew very successfully inside this enclosure.  The pictures you’ll see below were all taken while this orchid was still growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ flowering

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.

This Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen opened its first flower of the year on the 21st March 2019.  This is a naturally floriferous orchid species that blooms at least twice a year.  I’ve never managed to detect even a hint of any perfume from this Phalaenopsis specimen’s blooms, but the flowers are long lasting, they bloom for at least three months at each blooming period.

Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aprari’, as pictured on the 19th September 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aprari’ specimen’s developing flowering spike and faded flowering spike, as pictured on the 19th September 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aprari’ specimen’s developing flowering spike and faded flowering spike, as pictured on the 19th September 2019.
My Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen in bud, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ specimen’s developing flower buds, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 23rd October 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 23rd October 2019.
Here’s a closer look at an individual Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’ flower with a fingertip for scale, as pictured on the 23rd October 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 23rd October 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 7th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 7th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 7th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 29th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 29th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 29th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom on the 29th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis equestris ‘Aparri’, pictured in bloom, on the 24th December 2019.

Phalaenopsis finleyi

Phalaenopsis finleyi, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

I’ve got two Phalaenopsis finleyi plants growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium; neither plant looks in good condition at the moment, but these orchids can appear to be withered and dead.  In springtime, Phalaenopsis finleyi bursts into life, producing new roots and leaves; after a month or so the plants look unrecognisable.

Phalaenopsis finleyi, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

I can’t promise that these Phalaenopsis finleyi plants will both burst into life, but I have my fingers crossed.

Phalaenopsis finleyi, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

I also have two Phalaenopsis gibbosa specimen’s residing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  These plants have been growing inside this enclosure for two years.  Initially the plants seemed to be growing well, but they’ve been in poor condition for over a year now.  I’m trying to improve these plants’ growing conditions, but I’ve not managed to coax any positive growth from the plants as yet.  I will keep moving the plants around until I find a way to improve their health.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

I’ve found that snails are particularly fond of Phalaenopsis gibbosa leaves, with new leaves being something of a delicacy.

Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis gibbosa, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

I’m very fond of Phalaenopsis honghenensis.  This is a very special orchid species.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

It’s lovely in spring when plants seem to come back to life.  Here’s the Phalaenopsis honghenensis specimen that I’m growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  You might be able to see in my photographs – this plant is producing its first new leaf of the year.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 6th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 6th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 6th April 2020.

I’m hoping that this orchid won’t be troubled by snails; I have my fingers crossed!

Phalaenopsis lobbii 

Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.

Phalaenopsis lobbii is a superb little orchid; I must confess that I’m head over heals in love with this orchid species.  I’ve got two Phalaenopsis lobbii plants growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium, both plants have been growing happily inside this enclosure.

It has been a delight to see these plants in bloom over the past year.  Here are some of the flowers my Phalaenopsis lobbii plants produced from March 2019 to March 2020:

Phalaenopsis lobbii flowering

Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in flower on the 15th April 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 15th May 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in bud, on the 5th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, pictured in bud, on the 5th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii in bloom, as pictured on the 27th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii in bloom, as pictured on the 27th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 20th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 20th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia is another of my favourite Phalaenopsis species.  I just adore this orchid’s pastel yellow coloured flowers, they’re irresistible!

I’ve got one Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia plant growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant has been growing inside this enclosure for the past two years.

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia flowering

This Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia specimen had been flowering for a few weeks, by the time I took this picture of the plant, as its flower was starting to fade.

Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia in flower, as pictured on the 21st June 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii var. flavilabia, as pictured on the 8th July 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii var. flavilabia in bloom, as pictured on the 16th July 2018.
My Phalaenopsis lobii var. flavilabia specimen in bud, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
My Phalaenopsis lobii var. flavilabia specimen in bud, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 17th November 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, pictured in flower, on the 5th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia was pictured in bloom, on the 15th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia was pictured in bloom, on the 15th December 2019.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lobbii f. flavilabia, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis lowii

Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

Phalaenopsis lowii is a really interesting orchid species.  This plant has been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for the past two years.

Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

It’s always exciting to see plants come back to life!  I just hope the snails will allow this Phalaenopsis lowii specimen’s leaves to grow to full size.

Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 25th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 25th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 25th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis lowii, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

This Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen doesn’t look in good shape.  This Phalaenopsis has been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for two years.  I desperately want to make this plant healthier and happier!

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

As you can see, a number of this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ plant’s leaves are marked and one of the newest leaves has sadly been damaged by snails.

Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
A closer look at the damage on this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen’s leaves, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
A closer look at the damage on this Phalaenopsis lueddemanniana ‘Woodlawn’ specimen’s leaves, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis

This Phalaenopsis malipoensis specimen has been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for the past two years.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis flowering

Phalaenopsis malipoensis, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.

This Phalaenopsis malipoensis plant flowered during February and March 2019.  You can see this plant’s last flower from its last blooming pictured above.

Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis malipoensis, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii

Phalaenopsis micholitzii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

These Phalaenopsis micholitzii plants have been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for about six months.  I had wanted to mount these plants on some cork by now, but due to the problems I’ve had with ants over the past six months, I’ve postponed any mounting for the time being.  I’ve not seen any ants for a couple of weeks, so I am tempted to mount these Phalaenopsis plants when I next get the opportunity.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina

Phalaenopsis pantherina is a small sized orchid species. This plant is pictured in bud, on the 15th August 2019.

I grew this Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen inside my Rainforest Terrarium from April 2018 until November 2019.  This plant flourished inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  All of the pictures you see here, were taken whilst this plant was growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

These Phalaenopsis pantherina roots have moulded themselves to the shape of the piece of cork bark that this orchid is mounted onto, as pictured on the 15th August 2019.
A closer look at a developing Phalaenopsis pantherina flower bud, as pictured on the 15th August 2019. You can see the flower markings through the bud.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 27th August 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 27th August 2019.

Phalaenopsis pantherina flowering

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 31st August 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 31st August 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 31st August 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 31st August 2019.

Whatever time of the day or night that I inspected this plant, I wasn’t able to detect any perfume from this Phalaenopsis pantherina flower.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 4th September 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 4th September 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 16th September 2019.
Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 16th September 2019.
My Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen in flower, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
My Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen in flower, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
My Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen in flower, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.
My Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen in flower, as pictured on the 2nd October 2019.

If you’re interested in this plant, you can follow this Phalaenopsis pantherina specimen’s development in my upcoming articles about my Tall Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis parishii

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

This is a young Phalaenopsis parishii plant that I’ve been growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium for the past ten months.

My Rainforest Terrarium is home to vast numbers of millipedes, whose droppings have formed a soil like layer that’s particularly noticeable around this Phalaenopsis parishii plant.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba

This orchid is the white flowered form of the orchid species above.  I have been growing this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen since it was a tiny seedling.  So it was wonderful to see this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen in bloom for the very first time!

Phalaenopsis parishii alba flowering

Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.

This is a young Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen.  This plant flowered for the very first time in 2019; this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen’s first flower opened on the 20th March 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 21st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured in flower, on the 31st March 2019.

During its first flowering, this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen produced one single flower, which faded at the beginning of April 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii f. alba, pictured on the 21st December 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, pictured on the 31st December 2019.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 5th January 2020.

Nine months after this plant’s last flowering, this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen was ready to bloom again.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 12th January 2020.

On the 11th January 2020, the first flower opened for this Phalaenopsis parishii alba specimen’s second flowering.  This time, the plant produced nine flower buds.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 12th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 21st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 21st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 21st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 21st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 21st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 23rd January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 23rd January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 23rd January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 31st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 31st January 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis parishii alba, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

I have one Phalaenopsis pulcherrima specimen growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant was introduced to this enclosure in April 2018.  So, as I write to you today, this Phalaenopsis plant has been growing inside this terrarium for two years.  Previously this orchid was a continual resident in the Rainforest Terrarium, but this year I’ve had to move this orchid in and out of this terrarium, as I’ve tried to maintain the plants.

Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.
Phalaenopsis pulcherrima, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 19th September 2019.

I grew this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen inside my Rainforest Terrarium from April 2018 until November 2019, when I moved this plant to my Tall Orchidarium.  The photographs you see here, were taken whilst this orchid was growing inside my Rainforest Terrarium.

This orchid is currently in the process of producing a flower spike.  I’m so looking forward to seeing this Phalaenopsis pulchra plant in bloom!

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s developing flowering spike, as pictured on the 19th September 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 19th September 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 28th October 2019.
Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 28th October 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 28th October 2019.
A closer look at this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s developing flower spike, as pictured on the 28th October 2019.

In November 2019, I moved this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen into my Tall Orchidarium.  You’ll be able to follow this plant’s progress in my Tall Orchidairum updates.

Phalaenopsis stobartiana

Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 29th March 2020.

For the past couple of years, I have been growing this Phalaenopsis stobartiana plant inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  This plant looks rather ragged; I’m hoping I can help this orchid to flourish, this year.

Phalaenopsis stobartiana, as pictured on the 15th April 2020.

Links to More articles

More articles about my Rainforest Terrarium

To find out how my Aerangis, Angraecum, and Amesiella plants grew inside my Rainforest Terrarium from March 2019 to March 2020, please click here.

To discover the thinking behind the design of my Rainforest Terrarium and see this terrarium as it was first set up, please click here.

To find out about how the equipment inside my Rainforest Terrarium performed over the first eleven months following installation, please click here.

To find out how the Aerangis, Amesiella, and Angraecum orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium grew and developed over the first eleven months after they were introduced to this enclosure, please click here.

To find out how the Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium grew and developed over the first eleven months after they were introduced to this enclosure, please click here.

To see the full planting list for my Rainforest Terrarium, please click here.

To see every article about my Rainforest Terrarium, please click here.

Terrarium, Vivarium, and Orchidarium Trials

To see how my Orchidarium was created, please click here.

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To see a planting list of ferns, orchids, and other plants that are perfectly suited to growing inside terrariums and bottle gardens, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

To read how I track the temperature, humidity, and light conditions inside my terrariums, please click here.

Further Trials

You may be interested in some of the other trials I have conducted.

Compost Trial Reports

To see all of my Compost Trials, please click here.

To read advice on planting up containers, please click here.

Scented Daffodil Trial Reports

To see the results of my 2018 Scented Daffodil Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2018 Scented Daffodil Container Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2017 Scented Daffodil Trial, please click here.

Slug and Snail Trials

To see the results of my Slug and Snail Trial and discover the best methods of protecting your plants from slugs and snails, please click here.

To read about using nematodes to protect your plants from slugs and snails, please click here.

Sweet Pea Trial Reports

To read the results of my 2017 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

To read the results of my 2015 Sweet Pea Trial, please click here.

Tomato Trial

To read my Trial of New Tomato Varieties in full, please click here.

Vegetable Trials

To see all of my Vegetable Trials, please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

For edible gardening articles, please click here.

To read about the Queen of Orchids, the largest orchid in the world, please click here.

To read about the features of the 2017 BiOrbAir Terrarium, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

One thought on “An update on the Paphiopedilum & Phalaenopsis orchids inside my Rainforest Terrarium (part two)

  1. Anne Liem

    May 1, 2020 at 4:48pm

    You are truly amazing and your terrarium is amazing. Such patience. Thank you for sharing.

    • Author

      Pumpkin Beth

      May 1, 2020 at 4:51pm

      I’m really not that amazing, but thank you for your kindness Anne! I really appreciate your lovely comments and support. I hope that this message finds you safe and well. Take care. Warmest wishes, Beth

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