The Tomatoes in my Quadgrow are still growing!

The Tomatoes in my Quadgrow are still growing!

This year, I’ve been running more Trials with Tomatoes; I’ll share all the results from my Tomato Trials with you in due course, but today I wanted to show you my Quadgrow Self Watering Planter.  Most of my tomato plants have now given up or been affected by Late Blight, but the tomatoes in my Quadgrow have (for the moment) escaped this disease.  Hooray!

Here’s my QuadGrow Self Watering Planter, as pictured on the 1st October 2020. My ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants are still growing and flowering!

Here’s my Quadgrow.  I took this picture for you yesterday; as you can see, my ‘Honeycomb’ tomato plants are still growing and flowering!  We’re into October now, so the temperatures and hours of sunlight are reducing each day and soon my tomato plants will be just a happy memory.  However for the moment, I’m continuing to harvest tomatoes from my Quadgrow every week.

At this time of year, I don’t delay or wait around for my tomatoes to ripen.  Since the middle of September, I’ve been gathering the largest fruit my tomato plants produce every week; I bring my tomatoes inside and ripen them indoors (if you want to know how to ripen tomatoes, I have listed lots of effective and useful tips here).  With the largest fruits removed, my tomato plants can now devote all their energy into developing the tiny tomatoes that I’ve left on the plant; which will mean that I’ll get to enjoy a larger harvest of delicious tomatoes, before the season ends.  Yummy!

This year, in my Quadgrow, I’ve grown ‘Honeycomb’ tomatoes, which have a fantastically sweet and tangy flavour.  If you’ve not grown ‘Honeycomb’ tomatoes before, I would absolutely recommend you try these tomatoes next year – they’re truly delicious!

Here’s my QuadGrow Self Watering Planter, as pictured on the 6th September 2020.

Here’s is a photograph I took last month, showing my Quadgrow Self Watering Planter in early September 2020.  If you’re interested in this self-watering planter, here’s a link to more information about the Quadgrow.

I started all of the seeds for for my Tomato Trials in my Access Garden Products Exbury Classic Growhouse.  When all risk of frost had passed, (at the end of May) my tomato seedlings were hardened off and grown outside.  It has been a super year for tomatoes!  I’ve been enjoying tomatoes all summer long and if I’m lucky, I may just get to enjoy another week or two of green tomato harvests yet!

As the autumnal weather arrives and temperatures dip, I’ve moved some of my sweet peppers and chilli peppers into my glasshouse to protect the plants from frost.  If you’ve got tender plants outside and you want to keep them going, don’t forget to bring your plants inside.  If you have a conservatory, a bright room or a sunny windowsill, chilli peppers make a lovely houseplant; bringing the plants inside will allow any remaining chillies to ripen indoors.  Plus, overwintered chilli pepper plants will go on to produce more chilli peppers next year, so it’s worth keeping these plants going, if you can.

Here’s my Access Garden Products Exbury Classic Growhouse. I’ve just moved some of my sweet pepper and chilli pepper plants inside my glasshouse, to protect the plants from frost.

A look inside my Access Garden Products Exbury Classic Growhouse, as pictured on the 1st October 2020. These Sweet Pepper ‘Pepperilli’ plants were growing outside, but I’ve just moved them inside my glasshouse, to protect the plants from frost.

These Sweet Pepper ‘Pepperilli’ plants have been fantastic this summer, they’ve produced a bumper harvest of sweet peppers!

This graph compares the maximum temperature in my unheated Access Garden Products Exbury Classic Growhouse (the red line) with the temperature outside in my garden (the blue line), for the last week of September 2020. The overnight temperatures are similar – in fact, the temperature of the glasshouse drops slightly lower than the outdoor temperature sensor which is right next to the house. However, during the day, when the sun shines on the glasshouse, the temperature rises significantly – hitting over 30C (86F) regularly, despite the ambient outdoor temperature barely exceeding 16C (60F). This extra blast of heat helps to ripen late-fruiting peppers!

Other articles that may interest you………..

For gardening advice for October, please click here.

For information on growing garlic, please click here.

To see my Tomato Trials, please click here.

To see my Compost Trials, please click here.

For advice on houseplants, please click here.

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