White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial (part fifteen)

Welcome to the fifteenth and final installment of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial.  I started this White Orchid Trial in March 2017, when I planted white flowered orchids inside one of my BiOrbAir terrariums.  My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium was one of my favourite terrariums for a long time, but over the past two years I have been frustrated by tedious problems with condensation coating the inside of this BiOrbAir’s globe, which has spoilt the appearance of this enclosure and obscured my view of the plants inside.

Consequently, after being unable to solve this BiOrbAir terrarium’s condensation problem; yesterday I removed the white flowered miniature orchids from this terrarium and moved these plants into other enclosures.  I now intend to replant this BiOrbAir with terrarium plants.  However, if the condensation problems persist, I’ve decided that I will use this enclosure as a quarantine terrarium.

In this final update, we’ll take a look back at my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium over the past three and a half years and I’ll also give you an update on the white flowered orchids that I grew inside this BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Reasons for this White Orchid Trial

I decided to plant up this White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium in April 2017, after receiving many requests from readers asking about white flowered, miniature, epiphytic orchids to grow in terrariums.  I didn’t have a spare terrarium available to plant at the time, so I decided to empty, and then re-plant my long-term review BiOrbAir terrarium with various species of white-flowered orchids, to showcase how beautiful a single colour planting scheme can look in terrariums, vivariums, orchidariums, and bottle gardens.

If you’re interested in my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, you can find all of the articles I’ve written about this terrarium, by clicking this link.

BiOrbAir Terrarium

The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated, terrarium, which was designed by Barry Reynolds, and is available from Oase.  If you would like to see this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium after it was first planted in 2014, please click here.  While you can read about the latest features of the updated 2017 model of the BiOrbAir terrarium here.

I have a few BiOrbAir Terrariums.  I’ve really enjoyed trialling white flowered orchids inside this attractive acrylic globe.  However, I’ve now removed the white flowered orchids that were growing inside this terrarium and instead I am now going to concentrate on trialling some different plants inside this BiOrbAir terrarium.

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium condensation problems

This is my oldest BiOrbAir terrarium.  I first planted up this BiOrbAir back in 2014, when I used a wide range of different plants to learn more about the BiOrbAir.  Then in 2017, I emptied this BiOrbAir terrarium and planted it up with orchids for my White Orchid BiOrbAIr Terrarium Trial.

Over the past two years, I have had a lot of problems with condensation spoiling the look of this enclosure.  I now intend to replant this BiOrbAir with terrarium plants; if the condensation problem persists, I will use this enclosure as a quarantine terrarium.

A look back at my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium over the past three and a half years……

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 9th April 2017.

Here’s my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, pictured not long after I first planted this terrarium up, back in April 2017.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 12th May 2017.

Two of the orchids that were included in my first planting of this terrarium back in 2017, were still growing inside this enclosure when I dismantled it yesterday; namely Neofinetia falcata and Podangis dactyloceras.  Some of the other plants that were trialled inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium have died; while other orchids have been moved to new enclosures.

If you’re interested in any of the plants that I’ve grown inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, many of the plants that I’ve moved to new terrariums can be followed in my various terrarium updates.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 20th August 2017.

I’ve played around with the planting inside this terrarium and created a number of different planting schemes and designs, over the past three and a half years.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 27th November 2017.

Over the years, I’ve moved plants around inside my White Orchid Trial Terrarium to try to find each orchid species’ sweet spot – the position where they’d be happiest growing inside this enclosure.  I’ve been on a quest to discover which areas inside this terrarium would fulfil these plants’ requirements and achieve an ideal balance of light and air circulation that would support my plants and encourage healthy growth and flower production.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 28th December 2017. Inside this Terrarium, Aerangis hyaloides and Amesiella minor are flowering, and Amesiella philippinensis, Hymenorchis javanica, and Brachypeza semiteretifolia are all in bud.

Some of the miniature orchids that I’ve grown inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium have thrived inside this terrarium.  While other orchids have been happy for a while but then the plant’s fortunes have changed and the and plant has died.  I’ve been saddened by each plant that has died, but I’ve learnt from each and every plant I’ve grown.  I’ve shared the knowledge I’ve gained, here in my regular terrarium updates.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th January 2018. Inside this Terrarium, Hymeorchis javanica and Amesiella philippinensis are in flower.

I’ve really loved growing white flowered orchids in the BiOrbAir terrarium and I’m sorry that this trial has come to an end.

Amesiella philippinensis and Hymenorchis javanica, pictured in flower inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, on the 23rd January 2018.

As well as orchids, over the years, I’ve grown Humata repens alongside a variety of self-seeded ferns inside this terrarium.  I adore ferns and I love growing ferns inside terrariums.  I am grateful for how my ferns complimented these orchids and enhanced this enclosure.

My White Orchid Trial Terrarium, pictured on the 8th June 2018, after a recent rearrange.

As well as my white flowered orchids and a few ferns, I’ve also maintained a beautiful carpet of green moss inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

A look inside this BiOrbAir terrarium, which features a Phalaenopsis micholitzii specimen in bloom, alongside some Humata repens, other ferns and orchids. Pictured on the 26th July 2018.

Green is my favourite colour.  This Humata repens fern added a welcome touch of green and the delicate filigree patterns of intricate fern fronds to my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I find that miniature ferns are always a true delight!

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 28th August 2018.
My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 4th March 2019. Inside this terrarium Amesiella philippinensis is in flower.

Over the past three and a half years, it has been wonderful to admire so many magnificent orchid flowers being produced by the miniature orchids I’ve grown inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I’ve grown miniature orchids that have produced tiny flowers, medium sized flowers, and large flowers.  They have all been an absolute delight!  I have appreciated each and every bloom my plants have developed and I have adored all of the miniature orchids I’ve grown inside this terrarium.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 4th March 2019. Inside this terrarium Amesiella philippinensis is in flower.

I wasn’t sure whether my raised planting was contributing towards the persistent condensation inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I’ve moved things around inside this enclosure, yet the condensation has not reduced.  I will now wash up this BiOrbAir terrarium and plant it up with some different terrarium plants.  Although, if the condensation returns, I will move my plants to other enclosures and I’ll use this BiOrbAir terrarium as a quarantine terrarium.

If you’re interested in my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, you can find every update for this terrarium, by clicking here.

My White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 16th January 2020.

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium growing conditions

The conditions inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium have tended to range from being too wet and then going to the other extreme, with drier growing conditions than I would have wished for.  It has been difficult to create optimum growing conditions inside this terrarium; not being able to clearly see the plants inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium (without opening the lid and physically removing a plant) has undoubtedly had a negative effect on the plants, as I have been unable to monitor the orchids as easily as I can with my other terrariums.

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium humidity

This chart shows the humidity in the White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium throughout 2020. As you can see, for most of the time it was maxed out at 120%RH. I am not sure if the fan in this terrarium is fully functional, but I have been experiencing problems with the air circulation in the terrarium for quite sometime now. The dip from April to May 2020 indicates where the sensor ran out of batteries!

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium temperature

This chart shows the minimum and maximum temperature inside the White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium throughout 2020. You can see that it’s consistent through winter and then really starts to peak and trough in the summer, getting over 30C (86F) on at least two occasions. Note that the straight lines between April and May indicate a period when the sensor had run out of batteries.

White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium Planting List:

These plants were the last orchids I grew inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium:

You can see the full planting list for this terrarium here.  My planting list provides more details about each of the orchids that were recently grown inside this terrarium, as well as information about all the other orchids that I have previously trialled inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

If you’re interested in purchasing plants or materials for your terrarium; my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Planting List provides the details of all of the nurseries and suppliers, where I purchased all of my orchids, the mosses, and cork, used inside this terrarium.

For a longer planting list of terrarium plants, please click here.

If you’re wondering how I mounted my orchids onto the cork wood, you’ll find more information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark here.

White flowered miniature epiphytic orchids

Here’s a look at the white flowered miniature orchids that (up until yesterday) I grew inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium………..

Aerangis hyaloides

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

Over the past two years, I’ve found that this particular Aerangis hyaloides specimen has been more floriferous than I was expecting, which was a lovely surprise.  In my photographs, you can see that this Aerangis hyaloides plant flowered in January 2020, which initially might sound like a pretty standard event for an Aerangis hyaloides orchid (as these orchids usually flower during December and January); however, this very same plant was also in bloom during May 2019, so for this plant has gone to a lot of trouble to bloom again just eight months later.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

My Aerangis hyaloides plant was very happy growing inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium.  If you’re considering whether or not to include this particular orchid species inside your BiOrbAir terrarium; I can tell you that this species is very happy growing inside this terrarium – I would recommend Aerangis hyaloides, if you’re looking for an orchid to grow inside the BiOrbAir.

Although I must say, that if you’re considering purchasing an Aerangis hyaloides plant, please do ensure that your plant has been grown in cultivation and not taken from the wild.  Many orchids are taken from the wild where they are often over collected, which can be catastrophic!  This practice can destroy ecosystems and upsets the balance of nature, sometimes putting orchid species in danger of extinction.  I believe we all need to do more to protect our wildflowers, trees, plants, and the precious wild landscapes we are blessed with, all over the world.  Even though I live in the UK, so I’m far from Aerangis hyaloides natural homelands in Madagascar, I can still help these magnificent orchids by choosing not to purchase plants that are taken from the wild.

How can you tell if an orchid is grown in cultivation?  One way to be certain that you’re purchasing orchids that have been grown in cultivation (and not taken from the wild) is to purchase a flask of orchid seedlings; as these will have been grown from seeds sown in a lab.

My Aerangis hyaloides plant has flowered reliably every year inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I’ve had other Aerangis hyaloides plants that have bloomed twice in a year, but on the whole, this orchid species doesn’t often flower twice a year.  Consequently, I have made a point of enjoying this Aerangis hyaloides specimen’s generosity with its flowers.  Here are some of my photographs, so you can enjoy my Aerangis hyaloides’ flowers, too.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

The flowers were rather sparse during my Aerangis hyaloides plant’s January 2020 blooming, (as you can see in my picture above) so I didn’t expect these blooms to persist or to look good for more than a week.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

However, this Aerangis hyaloides specimen surprised me, as its flowers were more resilient than I expected and although the blooms were rather sparse; they still lasted for as long this orchid’s typical flowering period.  So this year, this Aerangis hyaloides specimen bloomed until the middle of February 2020.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

Aerangis hyaloides is another of my favourite orchid species.  I just love everything about this plant – it produces magnificent star-shaped flowers that sparkle in the sunlight.  While the plant’s smooth, dark green coloured, glossy leaves, give the plant a real pizzazz, throughout the year.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

Aerangis hyaloides is a winter blooming orchid.  My plants are often in flower over the Christmas period.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

Here is a closer look at Aerangis hyaloides flowers.  The blooms glimmer in the light, which always impresses and delights me!  The sight of one of my Aerangis hyaloides plants in bloom really lifts my spirits on an otherwise dreary winter day.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

This isn’t a scented orchid but Aerangis hyaloides truly dazzles with its beauty.  This orchid’s flowers actually glisten in the light, which is quite magical!  I’ve seen many Aerangis hyaloides plants in flower and I can tell you that the joy these orchids flowers’ bring still feels like something out of a fairytale, just as it did the first time I discovered Aerangis hyaloides in bloom.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

This is such a handsome little orchid.  Even when there are no flowers in sight, Aerangis hyaloides still possesses a very pleasing countenance with its gorgeous leaves.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

Here’s an updated picture of this same Aerangis hyaloides plant that you saw in flower –  I took these pictures this week.  This Aerangis hyaloides specimen is in spike again; this miniature orchid is currently in the process of producing four new flowering stems.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

Here’s a closer look at my Aerangis hyaloides specimen’s developing flower spikes; aren’t they wonderful?  I am so looking forward to seeing this miniature orchid’s twinkling flowers again this winter!

Don’t worry, although this is the final installment of this particular White Orchid Trial; this is not the end of my orchid updates.  I will still be sharing pictures of my orchids and updates about my plants, here on my website.

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

Amesiella philippinensis

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

I’m so fond of Amesiella philippinensis.  This is another absolutely gorgeous orchid species that holds a very special place in my heart.

This particular plant was first grown inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I introduced this orchid to my Miniature Orchid Trial, back in October 2016.  A year later, (in November 2017) I moved this same Amesiella philippinensis plant over to my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

This Amesiella philippinensis specimen was a young plant that had yet to bloom when I purchased this orchid, back in 2016.  It was a special moment when this Amesiella philippinensis specimen reached maturity and this plant flowered for the first time – this was a few years ago now – back in January 2018.

By February 2019, this same Amesiella philippinensis specimen was in flower for the second time, but sadly this plant has not bloomed since then.  Happily, I can tell you that this Amesiella philippinensis plant is now in spike…yippee!  This plant’s next flowering will be the third time this Amesiella philippinensis specimen has bloomed.

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

I’ve found that this Amesiella philippinensis specimen is a winter flowering orchid that tends to bloom in January or February.

I often see Amesiella philppinensis described as a fragrant orchid, but I have never ever detected any perfume from my plant’s flowers, despite a great many close encounters, at every time of the day and night.

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

I don’t think you’ll be able to tell from my photographs, but when I examined this Amesiella philippinensis specimen earlier this week, I found that the moss that this Amesiella philippinensis specimen is growing amongst was much drier than I had hoped.

Before I dismantled the planting inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, this orchid was growing on a piece of cork that I placed at the highest point of my terrarium’s planting; here this orchid was closest to the BiOrbAir terrarium’s fan and directly below my BiOrbAir terrarium’s LED lights.

Amesiella philippinensis, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

The fan would have contributed to drying out this Amesiella philippinensis plant and its moss but this plant has also benefitted from the increased air circulation and the closer proximity to the BiOrbAir’s LED lights.

However, where this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium’s globe has been constantly obscured by condensation, the only way to discover how the plants were growing has been to lift the lid, remove the plants and examine them.  I’ve not always been able to do this; so as a result, on a few occasions, I have assumed that the orchids inside this enclosure were wet enough (or were potentially too wet) and I’ve not misted the plants with my hand held water bottle.  As a result, the plants inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium have unfortunately gone without sufficient moisture on numerous occasions.  Now that I have dismantled this terrarium, I am sure that I will be able to provide my plants with improved growing conditions.

Brachypeza semiteretifolia

Sadly, the Brachypeza semiteretifolia plant that was growing inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium has now died.

Ceratostylis pristina

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.

It feels so wonderful to be able to share my Ceratostylis pristina specimen’s flowers with you in this update!  This is a small but elegant miniature orchid species; it’s another plant that thrives inside the BiOrbAir terrarium!

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.

Prepare yourself, as this Ceratostylis pristina specimen has flowered on many occasions over the past year, so I have a lot of photographs to share with you!

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.

I don’t always manage to capture a picture of an orchid flower as it opens; so it was wonderful to be able to take some pictures of this Ceratostylis pristina specimen, as its flowers opened on Valentine’s Day, in February 2020.  I think home-grown flowers always make Valentine’s Day extra special!

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.

This is such a special orchid species; I am really fond of this Ceratostylis.  I have absolutely loved growing this Ceratostylis pristina specimen inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 14th February 2020.

Here’s a look inside a Ceratostylis pristina flower bud.  In this photograph, you’re seeing this orchid’s flower, as it opens for the first time.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 3rd March 2020.

The orchids that I’ve grown inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium are miniature sized orchid species that won’t grow too large for this type of enclosure.  All of the orchids that you can see in this update are a minimum of at least a few years old.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 3rd March 2020.

Here’s a much closer look at the centre of an Ceratostylis pristina flower.  Isn’t it magnificent?  This is another miniature orchid with flowers that sparkle and twinkle in the light.

A closer look at this Ceratostylis pristina flower, as pictured on the 3rd March 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 21st April 2020.

I am really interested in crystalline orchids, so I grow as many orchids with crystalline flowers as I can!

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 21st April 2020.

It’s always nice to be able to get a closer view of an orchid flower.  Ceratostylis pristina produces these handsome leaves, which I so enjoy seeing.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 21st April 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina in flower inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th April 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina in flower inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th April 2020.

I love Ceratostylis pristina flowers’ fresh green and white centres.  Although, I must be honest, I can’t think of anything I don’t like about this dear little orchid species.

Ceratostylis pristina in flower inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th April 2020.

I adore Ceratostylis pristina flowers, but this orchid species produces these delightful leaves which really set off the flowers and give this plant its charming character.

Ceratostylis pristina in flower inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th April 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina in flower inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, as pictured on the 30th April 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.

In the right light, crystalline orchids can look as if they have been crafted from ice or knitted from frost.

Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 6th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 9th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 9th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 9th November 2020.
Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 9th November 2020.

About a year ago, I accidentally removed a little piece of plant (a division) from my main Ceratostylis pristina specimen and so I’ve been growing this baby Ceratostylis pristina plant inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  This little plant is growing well and increasing in size.

Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 9th November 2020.

I hope you’ve enjoyed looking at these Ceratostylis pristina pictures.  It’s wonderful to be able to share my plants with you.

Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 9th November 2020.

Holcoglossum flavescens

Sadly, the Holcoglossum flavescens specimen that I was growing inside my White Orchid BiOrbAIr Terrarium has now died.

Humata repens

Humata repens, pictured on the 10th November 2020.

This Humata repens fern has been growing quite happily inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  I adore this miniature fern, it’s a joyful fern that’s very diminutive in size and is also very slow growing.

I have a Humata repens fern that I planted in the coir compost inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium and another Humata repens specimen that you can see pictured here.  This fern was grown as an epiphyte – instead of planting this fern in compost, this fern was mounted on a piece of cork bark.  Both ferns have grown happily inside my BiOrbAir Terrarium.

Humata repens, pictured on the 10th November 2020.

I intentionally planted my Humata repens fern inside this terrarium, but quite a number of self-seeded ferns have sprung up inside this enclosure over the years.  Some have remained, quietly growing away in the background; while the larger self-seeded ferns that appeared were weeded out before they became too intrusive.

Neofinetia falcata

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

This Neofinetia falcata specimen is a sad sight that I feel terribly sorry to see.  This orchid has been growing inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir terrarium since I first planted this terrarium, back in March 2017.  All seemed well at first and this orchid looked good and flowered in its first year, but things have been going downhill since then!

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

I love the appearance of Neofinetia falcata‘s leaves.  Healthy Neofinetia falcata plants are very attractive, these plants display an elegant beauty that we can enjoy all year round.

My plant is certainly not in good health at the moment and I’m doubtful as to whether this orchid can recover from its current state.  However, I will do all I can to improve this orchid’s fortunes.  This Neofinetia falcata specimen has become rather dehydrated and is in need of additional moisture.

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

This Neofinetia falcata‘s roots aren’t looking in top form.  This plant is in very poor condition.

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

I feel really sad looking at these Neofinetia falcata photos.  I just hope that somehow I can reverse this plant’s fortunes.

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.
Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.
Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

Sadly, this Neofinetia falcata specimen has been liberally decorated with millepede droppings (a horrible thought I know – sorry!), which aren’t enhancing my plant’s appearance or this orchid’s health and condition.  There are a couple of markings that resemble scale and in my pictures it looks as if one mark definitely is a scale insect – but actually it’s a mark that was left (yonks ago now) by a scale insect!  So, not a living scale insect, but an indentation that was left after I removed a scale insect; I guess this took place a couple of years ago.

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

Podangis dactyloceras 

Podangis dactyloceras, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

This Podangis dactyloceras specimen was given to me by a friend and has been grown inside this White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir since I first planted up this terrarium, back in March 2017.  This miniature orchid has never flowered and the plant has visibly declined over the past year, since my last update.  I am hoping that a move to a new enclosure will provide more beneficial growing conditions for this Podangis dactyloceras specimen and we will then see this plant’s health improve.

By the way, I thought I’d mention, it may seem as if this Podangis dactyloceras plant has been growing in wetter growing conditions than the plant has actually experienced in reality – as this plant looks very wet in these two photographs.  However, just before I took these pictures I rinsed this plant in some water, in an attempt to remove some of the millipede droppings that were decorating the plant’s leaves and spoiling the view of this orchid.

Podangis dactyloceras, as pictured on the 9th November 2020.

To read the first part of my White Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.  To see every update from my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, please click here.

Other articles that may interest you…………

To read the first part of my Madagascar BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To read the first part of my Miniature Orchid BiOrbAir Terrarium Trial, please click here.

To see my Tall Orchidarium being set up, please click here.

To read about the general care I give to my orchids and terrarium plants, and the general maintenance I give to my BiOrbAir terrariums, please click here.

To read about the great new features of the 2017 BiOrbAir terrarium, please click here.

For information on how to mount epiphytic orchids onto cork bark, please click here.

To read a Planting List of a wide range and variety of beautiful plants which are suitable for growing in terrariums, vivariums, and bottle gardens, please click here.

To read about the Writhlington Orchid Project, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

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