An Update on the Phalaenopsis & Other Orchids Inside my Tall Orchidarium

Tall Orchidarium Update

Welcome to my first update on the Phalaenopsis and other orchids I’m growing inside my Tall Orchidarium.

I first set up my Tall Orchidarium in November 2019 (18 months ago).  If you would like to start at the beginning and see how my Tall Orchidarium was designed and set up, please click here.

I am absolutely thrilled with my Tall Orchidarium.  This custom built terrarium was built for me by Matthew (from Custom Aquaria) in autumn 2019.  I’m growing a large number of orchids inside my Tall Orchidarium, so I’ve divided up this update (which covers the period from November 2019 to May 2021) into three posts of slightly more manageable sizes.

To find out more about the equipment I’ve used inside my Tall Orchidarium and discover how these products have performed from November 2019 to February 2021 (and learn more about the growing conditions inside this terrarium), please click here.

To find out how the Aerangis and Angraecum orchids inside my Tall Orchidarium grew and developed, from November 2019 to March 2021, please click here.

Read on for an update on how the Phalaenopsis and the other orchids I’m growing inside this enclosure have developed over the past 18 months.

If you’re interested in my Tall Orchidarium, you’ll find all of my articles relating to this enclosure here.

Tall Orchidarium Planting List

These plants are currently growing inside my Tall Orchidarium:

    • Aerangis citrata
    • Aerangis hariotiana
    • Aerangis hyaloides
    • Aerangis kirkii
    • Aerangis macrocentra
    • Aerangis modesta
    • Aerangis mooreana
    • Aerangis somalensis
    • Aerangis x primulina
    • Angraecum aloifolium
    • Angraecum equitans
    • Angraecum ochraceum
    • Angraecum sacciferum
    • Bulbophyllum ambrosia
    • Ceratostylis philippinensis
    • Ceratostylis pristina
    • Dockrillia striolata
    • Humata repens
    • Macroclinium manabinum
    • Neofinetia falcata
    • Ornithocephalus manabina
    • Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’
    • Phalaenopsis equestris
    • Phalaenopsis honghenensis
    • Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis
    • Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata
    • Phalaenopsis pantherina
    • Phalaenopsis parishii
    • Phalaenopsis pulchra
    • Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’
    • Phalaenopsis wilsonii
    • Pteris sp.
    • Pyrrosia serpens
    • Restrepia purpurea ‘Rayas Vino Tinto’
    • Stelis muscifera

You can find out more about each of the plants I’m growing inside this enclosure via this link to my Tall Orchidarium Planting List.  The planting list features photographs and information about each of the orchids I’m growing inside this enclosure; plus at the bottom of each page you’ll find the details of the nurseries and suppliers where I purchased all of the cork, moss, and plants, for my Tall Orchidarium.  Any plants I’ve grown inside my Tall Orchidarium in the past and any plants I add in the future will also be added to this same Planting List.

Orchid Fertiliser & Water

I use these Orchid Focus fertilisers to feed the orchids in my collection.

I use Orchid Focus fertilisers (from Growth Technology Products) for all my orchids; I’ve been using two (Orchid Focus Grow and Orchid Focus Bloom) of these fertilisers for many years and I would absolutely recommend these products.  Whilst my orchids are actively growing, I will fertilise my plants once a week, for three weeks in a row; then on the fourth week I will only give my plants plain rainwater, without adding any fertiliser.  The next week, I will start the four week cycle again (and repeat).  I dilute my orchids’ fertiliser with rainwater.  If you aren’t able to collect rainwater, you could use reverse osmosis water or deionised water.

I have been using Orchid Focus Grow and Orchid Focus Bloom for many years, but I’ve recently discovered Orchid Ultra and I am now using all three of these products.

I use rainwater to water the orchids growing inside my Tall Orchidarium.

Tall Orchidarium Pests

Ants

When I first set up my Tall Orchidarium, I hadn’t realised it at the time, but the cork I purchased for this enclosure was already home to a colony of non-native Crematogaster scutellaris ants!  Yikes!

I say this somewhat tentatively, but I hope that 15 months after my ant discovery, my problems with ants are now finally over.  However, I will continue to monitor the situation – I am always on the look out for ants whenever I’m examining my Tall Orchidarium!  Find out more about these ants in this article I wrote about them.

Aphids

I have experienced numerous problems with a particularly tiny species of aphid, which is so small that I can only spot it in close up photographs.  I would be delighted (but very surprised!) if there weren’t any of these minuscule aphids on any of the orchids inside my Tall Orchidarium; as I know that there are colonies of the same species of aphids inside most (if not all) of my terrariums.

This aphid’s tiny size gives it a real advantage in allowing it to go undetected when I am viewing or checking over my plants.  However, the insects’ diminutive frame also provides these aphids with a greater chance to survive my pest control regime; as if even an area as small as pin point of leaf, root, or stem is missed when I spray my SB Plant Invigorator and an aphid happens to be in that unsprayed space, then this aphid will survive.  One solitary aphid will rapidly produce more aphids; so it’s a continual cycle of trying to control the aphids and prevent the aphid colony from growing too large.

I think if I recall correctly, that it was around a year ago that I last spotted aphids on one of the plants inside my Tall Orchidarium.  After making this discovery, I made a concerted effort to spray my plants with SB Plant Invigorator more regularly.  On one or two occasions, all of the orchids were taken out of this tank, so as to be able to spray the plants more thoroughly.

NB. I don’t spray any of the aphids or pests in my garden.  I only use SB Plant Invigorator to control the pests on my indoor plants.  This is an organic product.

Slugs

I didn’t stop to take their photographs, as I was rushing at the time, but I found two large slugs on the plants inside my Tall Orchidarium in November 2020.  The first slug I discovered was found on the 15th November 2020, on my Aerangis citrata plant, where it was about to devour this lovely orchid’s long awaited flower buds; thankfully I spotted it in time!  While on the 18th November 2020, I found a second slug on my Ornithocephalus manabina orchid; both slugs were promptly removed from this terrarium.

A found this slug on my Aerangis citrata plant, inside my Tall Orchidarium, on the 20th November 2020.

I found the third slug on the 20th November 2020.  I took this photograph, to show you the slug (!) and then I removed this mollusk from my Tall Orchidarium.

I can nearly always find miniature snails inside my terrariums, but I don’t find slugs very often.  However, having said this, I went on to find more slugs in November and December 2020, and sadly before I found the slugs, these mollusks had already devoured some of my orchids in their entirety, which was very upsetting.  I actually found more slugs this week: one slug on Thursday and another slug on Friday night (11th & 12th March 2021); needless to say these slugs were promptly extracted from my orchids and removed from my Tall Orchidarium.

After a short but blissful slug-free break, I discovered another slug at the beginning of April and a smaller slug in the first week of May 2021.

I am unsure where these slugs came from; they might have been concealed within the moss I bought for this terrarium.  It’s also possible that the slugs arrived with the cork I purchased.  I will be using my cucumber trick: placing fresh slices of cucumber inside my Tall Orchidarium – the cucumber works perfectly as a bait to draw any remaining slugs out of hiding, and away from the plants inside my Tall Orchidarium.  I can then easily find and collect up any slugs and snails and remove them from this enclosure.

Snails

Aerangis hariotiana, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

I have quite a number of teeny tiny snails living inside my Tall Orchidarium.  These little snails have caused far less damage over the past six years than the slugs inside my Tall Orchidarium caused in a two week period.  Snails can often be spotted in my orchid pictures.  I would naturally prefer to have no problems with slugs or snails inside my Tall Orchidarium; whenever I find a slug (and most of the times I spot a snail) I remove it.  Although I must say that I don’t often spot the snails until I see them in my photographs!

Spider mites

Goodness only knows how many spider mites are living inside my Tall Orchidarium, but I know that these insects persist inside this enclosure.  I’ve seen evidence of serious spider mite damage on many of the plants I’m growing inside my Tall Orchidarium.  You’ll find lots of ideas to help you control spider mites on orchids in this dedicated article I wrote; however you need to put in the time to thoroughly spray your plants – this is where I have fallen short.

Pest control

I use SB Plant Invigorator to help protect my orchids from aphids, scale insect, mealybugs, and spider mites.  I don’t always manage to spray my orchids and ferns with SB every single week, but it’s something I always aim for.

Cleaning my orchids’ leaves

Aerangis hyaloides, as pictured on the 26th January 2020.

Currently, almost all of the orchids that reside inside my Tall Orchidarium have coatings of algae, dust, moss, etc. on their leaves, which vary from plant to plant in their severity.  I like to use cooled chamomile tea to clean my orchids’ leaves; to do this, I take a piece of kitchen paper and dip it into the cold tea and then I gently wipe over each leaf.  I tear off tiny pieces of kitchen paper and dispose of them after cleaning a leaf or sometimes a couple of leaves on a single plant.  I never use the same piece of kitchen paper on multiple plants, as this could spread pests from one plant to another.  Anyway, I am absolutely itching to clean my orchids’ leaves at the moment!

Cleaning orchid leaves can help with pest control; this action can also improve your plant’s appearance and health; as having cleaner leaves improves the leaf’s ability to photosynthesise.  It’s important to be gentle when cleaning your plants’ leaves.

Tall Orchidarium Orchid Update

My Tall Orchidarium, as pictured on the 27th December 2020.

Tall Orchidarium Orchid Update

Bulbophyllum ambrosia

Bulbophyllum ambrosia pictured on the 1st January 2020.

This Bulbophyllum ambrosia plant was introduced into my Tall Orchidarium when this enclosure was first set up, back in November 20219.  The plants that you see here in this update were propagated from a larger plant that I previously grew inside my Orchidarium; this mother plant never flowered, despite forming a large specimen and so I sold it to raise money to purchase more plants.  However, I kept two small cuttings, which are the plants you see here – the Bulbophyllum ambrosia specimens I’m growing inside my Tall Orchidarium.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia pictured on the 1st January 2020.

Despite attaining a substantial size, my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plant declined to flower in the four years it spent in my care (inside another of my orchidariums) and so I suspected that I probably wasn’t providing my plants with a good enough light quality to facilitate flowering; hence my decision to position these Bulbophyllums at the very top of this enclosure, directly under my Tall Orchidarium’s LED lights.  It was a wonderful surprise when this smaller plant sent up its first ever flower buds in December 2019, just a month after this orchid was moved to this new enclosure!

Bulbophyllum ambrosia pictured on the 1st January 2020.

The LED lights I’m using inside my Tall Orchidarium were the brightest LED lights I had back in November 20219, when I first set up this enclosure.  I had expected quite a rapid response from my orchids, but I must say that this was a quicker reaction than I had anticipated – I hadn’t thought I’d be enjoying Bulbophyllum ambrosia flowers quite so soon!

Bulbophyllum ambrosia in bud, as pictured on the 6th January 2020.

If you’re growing Bulbophyllum ambrosia and your plant hasn’t been keen to flower, try moving your orchid to a brighter position and see if this will encourage your plant to bloom.  Another tip I’ve found is that Bulbophyllums really like to be quite wet.  My plants have continued growing and remained alive with a regular amount of misting and spraying, but I’ ve found that orchids from this genus thrive in wetter conditions with more frequent misting.  I have my fingers crossed that these tips will be useful and effective for you, and your Bulbophyllum ambrosia will soon send up lots of these fascinating flowers!

Bulbophyllum ambrosia flowering

Bulbophyllum ambrosia in bud, as pictured on the 6th January 2020.

My Bulbophyllum ambrosia plant’s first ever flower opened on the 18th January 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia in flower, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

If you’ve not met a Bulbophyllum ambrosia flower in person, I am excited to tell you that this orchid has delightfully perfumed flowers!  The scent is sweet, musky, and really rather lovely.  The blooms are small, so you need to enjoy a close encounter with the plant to take in this orchid’s perfume, but it’s a strong enough scent to be instantly discernible when you stand face to face.  I love scented flowers, so it’s rather special to have attained the key to encourage this orchid to bloom.

A closer look at this Bulbophyllum ambrosia flower, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 10th January 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia roots, as pictured on the 10th January 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 10th January 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 10th January 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Here are some photographs I took for you on Christmas Day 2020.  At this time, my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants were in bud and preparing to burst into flower!

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

On new year’s eve, I celebrated my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants’ second flowering, which was divine!

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia flowers produce a deliciously sweet perfume; I find this fragrance irresistible.  I delight in the flower’s sensual muskiness, which is complimented by a hint of Jasmine, and a touch of sweet pea.  Due to their small size, these tiny little flowers are not capable of fulling your home with perfume, but a close encounter with a flower is a wonderful opportunity to relish Bulbophyllum ambrosia flowers’ sweet and musky scent.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st December 2020.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 8th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 8th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 8th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 8th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 8th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, pictured on the 18th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, pictured on the 18th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, pictured on the 18th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, pictured on the 18th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, pictured on the 18th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

I originally grew this Ceratostylis philippinensis specimen inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium (from November 2017 through until November 2020).  I experienced problems with my BiOrbAir terrarium, so I dismantled this terrarium and moved my Ceratostyllis philippinensis plant into my Tall Orchidarium.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

This miniature epiphytic orchid has now been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium for the past six months.  I must admit that I was a little concerned when I first introduced my Ceratostylis philippinensis plant to this Tall Orchidarium, as this wasn’t an enclosure that I would have chosen for this orchid species.  I also felt reluctant to use the valuable space inside my new enclosure for an orchid that wasn’t part of one of my National Collections of orchids.  Despite this, I am happy that this Ceratostylis philippinensis specimen is doing well inside my Tall Orchidarium.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Although Ceratostylis philippinensis isn’t my favourite orchid, I still feel a lot of affection for this plant and I want to manage to successfully keep this miniature orchid alive!

Ceratostylis philippinensis flowering

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis in flower, as pictured on the 1st February 2021.

A closer look at a Ceratostylis philippinensis flower, as pictured on the 1st February 2021.

Ceratostylis philippinensis, as pictured on the 21st May 2021.

Ceratostylis pristina

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 4th December 2020.

From November 2017, until the 14th November 2020, this Ceratostylis pristina specimen was previously growing inside my White Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium, but after experiencing some equipment problems with my BiOrbAir terrarium, I ended my White Orchid Trial and I moved this miniature orchid into my Tall Orchidarium.

Although I didn’t plan on growing Ceratostylis pristina inside my Tall Orchidarium when I was planning this enclosure, thankfully, this miniature epiphytic orchid seems to be fairly happy in its new home.

Ceratostylis pristina flowering

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 4th December 2020.

Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 15th December 2020.

Ceratostylis pristina, pictured on the 15th December 2020.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Ceratostylis pristina, as pictured on the 21st May 2021.

Dockrillia striolata

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

This Dockrilla striolata specimen was grown from a tiny fragment of a plant (a division from a mother plant that my husband purchased at an OSGB auction).  I’ve been growing this small sliver of life inside my Tall Orchidarium, since I first set this enclosure up in November 2019.  This was such a minuscule cutting, that I didn’t get around to taking a picture of this plant until January 2021, when this Dockrilla striolata plant flowered for the first time.

Dockrillia striolata flowering

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

I was thrilled see this Dockrilla striolata plant bloom for the first time!

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

The centre of Dockrillia striolata flowers look as if they’ve been squirted with cream!

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Dockrillia striolata flowers produce a lovely scent.  You’d need to enjoy a close encounter with this orchid to take in its flower’s fragrance, but close up this perfume is both present and pleasing – it’s a sweet scent.

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

A closer look at a lovely Dockrillia striolata root. Pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

It’s always exciting to see a gorgeous new orchid root!

Dockrillia striolata, pictured on the 3rd January 2021.

Dockrillia striolata, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at two Dockrillia striolata leaves, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Dockrillia striolata, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at a Dockrillia striolata root, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Humata heterophylla

I did also include a Humata heterophylla fern early on when I was planting up my Tall Orchidarium, but this fern didn’t like the growing conditions and died a short while after its introduction to this enclosure.  I had entirely expected this fern to fail, but I like to test plants in new environments so I can learn more about them; even if this means that one of my trials confirms my expectations it’s still useful.

Humata repens

Humata repens, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

I adore miniature ferns!  I’ve managed to squeeze a couple of ferns into my Tall Orchidarium.  This is Humata repens, a truly miniature fern that can be grown as an epiphyte – mounted on cork – alternatively Humata repens can be cultivated terrestrially – planted in a compost.

A closer look at Humata repens, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

This fern is a true miniature – my plants are all under 10cm (4inch) tall.  It seems somewhat ironic that I’m growing such a tiny, low growing fern inside my Tall Orchidarium!  I’ve chosen to include this fern inside this enclosure, as I simply adore this charming fern.  I want to ensure that wherever physically possible, I include at least one Humata repens plant inside each of my terrariums.  This is an insurance policy that ensures that if anything happens to one of my terrariums I’ll always have at least one of these darling ferns alive and growing safely inside another enclosure.

Humata repens, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Humata repens, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Humata repens, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Humata repens, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum

Macroclinium manabinum, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Well this Macroclinium manabinum plant is in a sorry state!  It’s quite incredible that this tiny scrap of a plant is managing to flower!

Macroclinium manabinum, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

I grew this Macroclinium manabinum plant inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium from November 2017 until November 2020, but after experiencing some problems with my BiOrbAir terrariums, I dismantled these terrariums and moved my plants into other enclosures.  Hence this Macroclinium manabinum has been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium for the past six months – since November 2020.

Macroclinium manabinum, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

This miniature orchid was in such poor condition when I moved this plant to my Tall Orchidarium.  To be honest, although I want this once lovely orchid to survive. I am expecting the worst – I’m not expecting this orchid to make it.  However, I would absolutely love to be proved wrong on this – I would love this Macroclinium manabinum to survive.

Macroclinium manabinum, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum flowering

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 25th January 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum produces absolutely fabulous flowers!  This is an incredible display from a plant that has suffered immeasurably!

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 1st February 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

Macroclinium manabinum, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

Neofinetia falcata

Neofinetia falcata, as pictured on the 14th January 2021.

This is a tiny Neofinetina falcata seedling that I’ve been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium for a while.  Fingers crossed that this dear little plant will establish well.

Ornithocephalus manabina

Ornithocephalus manabina, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Ornithocephalus manabina is yet another orchid that was previously growing inside one of my BiOrbAir terrariums.  This miniature orchid was growing inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir from January 2019 until November 2020, when this plant was moved to my Tall Orchidarium.

The conditions inside my BiOrbAir terrarium were less than satisfactory for a considerable time before I eventually took action and moved my plants into new terrariums.  When things go wrong, the swifter you act and take steps to resolve things the better chance you have of success.  I fear that I’ve left it too long before I took action; my heart aches for this dear little plant who’s had a really rough time.  Consequently, my Ornithocephalus manabina has lost a lot of its leaves and this plant doesn’t look anywhere near as strong or healthy as I would like.  I hope that I can revive this plant, fingers crossed!

Ornithocephalus manabina, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Ornithocephalus manabina, as pictured on the 21st May 2021.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Here’s another orchid that’s not looking great!  My Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’ plant has been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium since I first set up this enclosure in November 2019.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

I didn’t provide this plant with a long enough period of drought, which accounts for my plant’s decline.  Many orchids require distinct seasons in order to thrive – periods of lower temperatures and drought or drier conditions are necessary to keep these plants in good health.

Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi ‘Green’, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis equestris

Phalaenopsis equestris, pictured on the 15th January 2021.

I’ve only taken one picture of this young Phalaenopsis equestris plant.  This plant has been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium, since I set up this enclosure in November 2019.  I can see visible signs of spider mite damage on this orchid’s leaves.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 14th January 2021.

I am hoping that this young Phalaenopsis honghenensis plant will continue to make good progress.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 14th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis honghenensis, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

This is Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis – this plant has been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium since November 2019 – which was 18 months ago, as I write to you today.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Here is the beginnings of a flower spike – exciting to see – but I doubt it will amount to anything, as this is a still a young plant.

Phalaenopsis inscriptiosinensis, as pictured on the 21st May 2021.

Phalaenopsis micholitzii

This is my Phalaenopsis micholitzii plant, as pictured on the 10th May 2020, when this orchid was first mounted and introduced to my Tall Orchidarium.

This Phalaenopsis micholitzii specimen is a young plant that was originally growing in a plastic pot inside my Rainforest Terrarium.  On the 10th May 2020, I mounted this plant on a piece of cork and moved this Phalaenopsis micholitzii specimen into my Tall Orchidarium.

This is my Phalaenopsis micholitzii plant, as pictured on the 10th May 2020, when this orchid was first mounted and introduced to my Tall Orchidarium.

This orchid soon started to decline inside my Tall Orchidarium, so I moved this Phalaenopsis micholitzii plant out into another terrarium.  I had thought that I would lose this Phalaenopsis micholitzii plant, but thankfully it’s still alive at the moment – a year later.  Speed is key – act quickly when you spot signs of distress.  My slow reactions can be my downfall, as I can’t respond as quickly as I would like.  I can’t drop everything to move plants into different growing conditions fast enough, and I lately I haven’t been able to spend as long as I would like SB-ing my orchids.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 28th September 2020.

This is Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata.  I’ve been growing this small sized orchid inside this enclosure since I set up my Tall Orchidarium in November 2019.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 28th September 2020.

This Phalaenopsis is displaying yellowing, patchy-coloured leaves.  I put this unhealthy appearance down to spider mite damage and not having achieved the ideal growing conditions for this Phalaenopsis species.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 28th September 2020.

It was exciting to see this Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata specimen’s flower spike developing!  However, I’m not getting my hopes up, as this orchid is becoming more and more yellow and less full of life with each passing month.  At the moment, I will just be happy if I can keep this orchid alive for the long-term.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 28th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 30th November 2020.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 30th November 2020.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 30th November 2020.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 30th November 2020.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

A closer look at a Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, leaf, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

A zoomed in view of this Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata plant’s crown, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

A closer look at a Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, flower spike, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis pallens var. denticulata, as pictured on the 21st May 2021.

Phalaenopsis pantherina

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina is another orchid that has declined.  This is the same plant that I grew inside my Rainforest Terrarium from April 2018 through until November 2019.  This small sized orchid has been badly affected by spider mites.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina flowering

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 24th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 24th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 24th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 24th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 4th December 2020.

A closer look at this developing Phalaenopsis pantherina flower bud, as pictured on the 4th December 2020.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pantherina, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii

Phalaenopsis parishii in bud, as pictured on the 2nd December 2019.

I’m growing two Phalaenopsis parishii plants inside my Tall Orchidarium.  I introduced both of these plants to my Tall Orchidarium in November 2019.  I’ve also got another young seedling, which is possibly a Phalaenopsis parishii plant – but it could also be something else entirely.

A closer look at Phalaenopsis parishii in bud, as pictured on the 2nd December 2019.

This is my oldest Phalaenopsis parishii plant.  I’ve had this plant for a number of years.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 21st December 2019.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis parishii specimen’s developing flower buds, as pictured on the 21st December 2019.

Phalaenopsis parishii in bud, as pictured on the 6th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii in bud, as pictured on the 6th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii in bud, as pictured on the 6th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii flowering

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 20th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 20th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 20th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 28th January 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 10th February 2020.

This Phalaenopsis parishii plant looks rather ropey, as it has had its energy sapped by spider mites.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 8th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 8th March 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 2nd April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 2nd April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 27th April 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii with a remarkable amount of extensive leaf damage – caused by spider mites, as pictured on the 13th July 2020.

Yikes!  Look how bad this spider mite damage is!

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis parishii specimen’s leaves, as pictured on the 13th July 2020.

This is serious spider mite damage!

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis parishii specimen’s leaves, as pictured on the 13th July 2020.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

This is a small seedling I bought labelled as Phalaenopsis parishii.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Hello, lovely new root!

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

This is another Phalaenopsis parishii plant – I’ve had this plant for a number of years, but it’s not as old as the plant with the terrible spider mite damage that I showed you earlier.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 8th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 8th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 14th March 2021.

On the 15th March 2021, I cross pollinated this Phalaenopsis parishii plant with pollen from a lovely Phalaenopsis parishii specimen that’s growing inside my Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 16th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 16th March 2021.

I’ve found that not all Phalaenopsis parishii plants are scented, but this particular Phalaenopsis parishii specimen produces flowers with the most gorgeous musky, sweet fragrance.  On the 29th March 2021, I cross pollinated this Phalaenopsis with pollen from another Phalaenopsis parishii plant that’s growing inside my Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

After I pollinate Phalaenopsis parishii flowers they don’t look quite as nice as they do when the blooms are new and fresh; so, I took a few pictures to show you the flowers in their prime.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

The orange-peach coloured Phalaenopsis parishii flower that you can see pictured above is one of the blooms that I pollinated.  Orchid flowers usually change colour or fade after pollination – the change in colour sends a message to the pollinators to let them know that they’re too late and the flower has already been fertilised.

A closer look at these Phalaenopsis parishii flowers, pictured on the 12th April 2021.

The two white flowers that you see pictured above have not been pollinated.  I left these flowers as I don’t want to overload the plant or place undue stress on this Phalaenopsis parishii specimen.  I will pollinate some of this plant’s later flowers.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

These slightly mangled looking seed pods also bear the scars of spider mite damage.

Phalaenopsis parishii seed pods, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

This Phalaenopsis parishii plant is so scrappy – this is my fault for not spraying my plants frequently or thoroughly enough with SB Plant Invigorator.  I feel very guilty seeing any of my orchids in a poor condition; my heart aches in apology and remorse.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 19th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 19th April 2021.

I took these pictures just before I pollinated this Phalaenopsis parishii flower.

Phalaenopsis parishii, as pictured on the 19th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 20th May 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 20th May 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 20th May 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 20th May 2021.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 20th May 2021.

In this photograph I’ve taken fro you below, you can really see the seed pods developing.  Both of these flowers have been pollinated – the yellow looking flowering stem was pollinated more recently than the chunky green seed pod, which as it has aged has developed these beautiful grooves.

Phalaenopsis parishii, pictured on the 20th May 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th May 2020.

I’ve written quite a lot about Phalaenopsis pulchra, including this article I wrote as this Phalaenopsis pulchra plant came into flower and this article I wrote when the plant has been in bloom for a while.   If you’re interested, you can find every article that mentions this plant – here.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th May 2020.

This plant was given to me by my friend, Gary Firth.  I grew this orchid inside my Rainforest Terrarium from April 2018 until November 2019, when I introduced this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen to my Tall Orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th May 2020.

This Phalaenopsis pulchra plant has produced a number of flower spikes.  My photograph below shows a flower spike alongside a root.  The flower spike has a slightly ‘mitteny’ look about it; whereas on this Phalaenopsis species, the plant’s roots are shaped almost like a pencil.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th May 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 18th May 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 29th June 2020.

A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s developing flower spikes, as pictured on the 29th June 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 29th June 2020.

A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s developing flower spikes, as pictured on the 29th June 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra flowering

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 17th August 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 8th September 2020.

This Phalaenopsis pulchra plant has produced this magnificent flower. The plant is currently in the process of producing a number of flowering stems. Pictured on the 10th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra’s vivid magenta flowers are perfectly complimented by this orchid’s handsome light green to mid-green coloured leaves.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 14th September 2020.

Here you can see my Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen in flower, as pictured on the 28th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra in flower, on the 28th September 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra is a small sized orchid, it’s larger than many of the orchids in my collection. Pictured on the 16th October 2020.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

A closer look at the mother plant of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

This Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen is producing some lovely new roots, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

A closer look at this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s longest stem, which is now developing a keiki, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

This is the beginnings of a new Phalaenopsis pulchra plant, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

A brand new Phalaenopsis pulchra plant complete with a new root, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 5th January 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A new Phalaenopsis pulchra keiki developing, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at this new Phalaenopsis pulchra keiki, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at two of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s roots, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at two of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s roots, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s new keikis, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at two of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s damaged flowering stems, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

A closer look at one of this Phalaenopsis pulchra specimen’s new flowering stems, as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis pulchra, as pictured on the 21st May 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Two of my best friends gave me this Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ plant – so it’s a plant that’s close to my heart.  I started growing this Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ plant inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium from November 2018 until November 2020.  After experiencing problems with my BiOrbAir terrarium, I dismantled my Miniature Orchid Trial and moved this Phalaenopsis to this enclosure.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

This is a hybrid Phalaenopsis that’s easy to grow and flower.  Currently, my plant is growing in a too bright position, but it’s managing OK.  This orchid would be happy growing as part of a group of orchids outside of a terrarium – Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ doesn’t require as humid an environment as the other orchids that are growing inside this orchidarium.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 8th March 2021.

Hybrid Phalaenopsis are widely available – you can purchase these plants from garden centres and supermarkets.  This is a miniature Phalaenopsis hybrid – you don’t tend to see quite as many of these smaller sized plants, but if you’d prefer a smaller plant like mine –  look out for them while you’re shopping for groceries or buy online.  I have miniature Phalaenopsis hybrids that came from Love Orchids – these plants were grown in the UK.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 8th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 8th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ flowering

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 8th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 16th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 16th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 16th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 16th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’ as pictured on the 29th March 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, as pictured on the 12th April 2021.

Phalaenopsis wilsonii

Phalaenopsis wilsonii, pictured on the 11th January 2021.

This is a really tiny Phalaenopsis wilsonii plant that I’m growing inside my Tall Orchidarium.  So far, so good – this little plant is growing nicely.

Self-seeded Pteris

A self seeded Pteris fern, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

This self-seeded Pteris popped up in the moss inside my Tall Orchidarium.  In January 2021, I potted up this little fern and it’s now growing away nicely inside this enclosure.

A self seeded Pteris fern, pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

A self-seeded Pteris fern, as pictured on the 15th April 2021.

Pyrrosia serpens

Pyrrosia serpens, as pictured on the 22nd March 2021.

This is Pyrrosia serpens, another miniature epiphytic fern that I’m growing inside my Tall orchidarium.  I introduced Pyrrosia serpens to my Tall Orchidarium in November 2019.  This plant has grown in size and developed well inside this enclosure, despite the lighting being rather challenging and temperatures being lower than this warm growing species would prefer.

Restrepia

An as yet unidentified Restrepia species, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

I’m not certain which Restrepia species this is.  This plant has been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium since I first set up this enclosure in November 2019.  This Resrepia sin’t looking as lovely or healthy as I would like.  Hopefully this orchid will become stronger and healthier in time.

An as yet unidentified Restrepia species, as pictured on the 21st January 2021.

Stelis muscifera

Stelis muscifera, as pictured on the 4th December 2020.

This Stelis muscifera is a sorry looking specimen.  The plant you see here is a mere fragment of its former self in many ways; this plant was originally part of a much larger and healthier specimen plant.  My Stelis muscifera plant had been growing inside my Orchidarium since March 2017.  This orchid was thriving and had developed into a large sized, stunningly healthy, beautiful miniature orchid.  I decided to divide my larger Stelis specimen to create a number of new plants.  This sounded like a great plan, until in the days following its separation each of the new miniature orchids I created seemed to writhe in agony, before rapidly dropping their leaves until all that remained were these dead-looking stems!

This Stelis muscifera ‘plant’ had no leaves whatsoever only a few short months ago, but now signs of hope are emerging with new leaves to give this plant hope of a happier and healthier new life.

Stelis muscifera, as pictured on the 14th January 2021.

Incidentally, this is by far the healthiest of the plants that I ‘created’ by dividing my original Stelis muscifera plant – the other divisions all died!  I wish I hadn’t attempted to propagate this plant.  You don’t know until you try – but I’ve tried it and I wouldn’t recommend dividing Stelis muscifera!

Stelis muscifera, as pictured on the 14th January 2021.

You can discover more about all of the orchids I’ve been growing inside my Tall Orchidarium, in my Tall Orchidarium Planting List.

Other articles that may interest you………………..

To see my Tall Orchidarium as I first set up this enclosure, please click here.

To see all of the articles I’ve written about my Tall Orchidarium, please click here.

To see a planting list of orchids, ferns, and other plants, that thrive inside terrariums and bottle gardens, please click here.

To see all of my articles about setting up terrariums, please click here.

To read about my Thanksgiving cactus, please click here.

To see my Rainforest Terrarium being created, please click here.

To see my houseplants, please click here.

Other articles you might like:

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