Orchids in bud and flower today!

Orchids in bud and flower today!

It’s always nice to share the joy of plants; with this in mind, I thought you might like to see an update on a few of my orchids.

Angraecum equitans update!

First of all, let me show you my Angraecum equitans plant.  You might remember this plant, as I’ve been writing about it for eight years now and I’ve trialled this particular Angraecum equitans plant in a number of different terrariums.  I absolutely adore this plant, it’s one of my favourite plants of all time but at the moment this Angraecum equitans specimen is actually producing a flower spike, which is very exciting!  There’s not a significant change to show you, but this miniature orchid’s flower spike has lengthened since I shared my last update.

It’s exciting to watch this Angraecum equitan’s flower spike developing. Any time I touch this orchid I worry I’ll snap off the spike – I am praying I won’t! Pictured on the 2nd February 2024.
Here’s a view of the other side of this Angraecum equitans plant. Pictured on the 2nd February 2024.

Aerangis hyaloides flower buds!

Here’s a picture of one of my Aerangis hyaloides plants in bud. The flower buds of this orchid species look like they are giving us the ‘thumbs up’ sign! Pictured on 2nd February 2024.
To help you gauge the size of this young miniature orchid, here’s a picture of the same Aerangis hyaloides plant in flower on the 27th February 2023. I grew this seedling from a flask of seedlings – this is a picture of this Aerangis hyaloides specimen’s first ever flowering.

I adore Aerangis hyaloides.  I used to grow a great many plants of this orchid species, as part of the National Collection of Miniature Aerangis and Angraecum Species, but I sadly lost many of these plants when my heating broke.  Luckily for me, my heating is all fixed and working perfectly now, and this Aerangis hyaloides plant survived.  I’m so very grateful that I didn’t lose all of my plants.

I don’t really want to even mention my heating breaking, it was ages ago now, but the plus side of giving my plants such cold temperatures for seven days and nights is that I can tell you about the plants that easily made it through this time, the plants that struggled, and the species that did not survive.  I hope this knowledge will help you improve your orchid growing or learn more about plants.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2017….

Bulbophyllum ambrosia pictured on the 3rd May 2017.

I’m pretty sure I bought this Bulbophyllum ambrosia as a very tiny plant back in March 2016.  I planted this orchid inside my Orchidarium in March 2017 and this Bulbophyllum remained inside this enclosure until I built my Tall Orchidarium in November 2019.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2018….

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 31st March 2018.

Bulbophyllum ambrosia increased in size inside my Orchidarium, but despite developing into a substantial sized plant that was larger than flowering size throughout its time in this enclosure, this orchid refused to bloom.

I divided my original Bulbophyllum ambrosia plant into three: one substantial plant that I sold at the Orchid Society of Great Britain Auction back in January 2018, and two much smaller plants that I continued growing inside my Orchidarium.  As these three plants are all divisions of the same plant they are genetically identical to one another; to increase the gene pool and propagate an orchid of the same species with different genes, I would need to pollinate the orchid flowers, wait for the seeds to ripen, and then sow the seeds and raise new plants.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2019……

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 5th January 2019.

I introduced two Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants to my new Tall Orchidarium at the beginning of November 2019.  I hoped that the brighter light inside my Tall Orchidarium would encourage these orchids to come into bloom.  To maximise the effect of the lights, I positioned both of these Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants directly underneath my Tall Orchidarium’s LED lights.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2020….

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 25th December 2020.

Hooray, it worked!  My Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants came into bloom for the first time in January 2020.

A closer look at this Bulbophyllum ambrosia flower, as pictured on the 18th January 2020.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2021….

Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.
Bulbophyllum ambrosia, as pictured on the 3rd January 2021.
Bulbophyllum ambrosia, pictured on the 18th January 2021.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2022….

Bulbophyllum ambrosia pictured on the 31st January 2022.
Bulbophyllum ambrosia pictured on the 31st January 2022.

A look back at my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2023….

My Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants survived my week-long cold snap when my heating failed in January 2023 and flowered triumphantly a little later than usual – in February 2023.

I took this picture of my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plant on the 27th February 2023.

Fast-forward to the present day and see my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants in 2024….

This Bulbophyllum ambrosia orchid flowers every winter at the same time. Pictured on the 2nd February 2024.
Bulbophyllum ambrosia is an epiphytic orchid. I grow all of my Bulbophyllum ambrosia plants mounted on large pieces of cork.
Bulbophyllum ambrosia’s gorgeous white and magenta striped flowers look stunning. These blooms produce a delightfully sweet and musky perfume.
There is a substantial quantity of moss growing around my Bulbophyllum ambrosia orchids. Low-level mosses grown in amongst orchids can be very beneficial to the orchids, as mosses retain water for extended periods of time, thereby raising humidity levels and improving the growing conditions for the orchids. Pictured on the 2nd February 2024.
This Bulbophyllum ambrosia flower has been blooming for around two weeks. Pictured on the 2nd February 2024.
Here’s a closer view of a Bulbophyllum ambrosia bloom. Pictured on the 2nd February 2024.

To see my Orchid Calendar and find orchid events, including plant sales, orchid talks, orchid shows, and more, please click here.

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For more articles about orchids, please click here.

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For gardening advice for February, please click here.

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