Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Big Leaf’ is a Fittonia that produces larger sized leaves than most Fittonia cultivars.  This particular cultivar features leaves that are around four times the size of a Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Bambino’ leaf.  The two plants are very similar in their appearance in all other respects; the obvious difference being the size of each Fittonia cultivar’s leaves. 

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Bambino’ is a cute little Fittonia.  This particular cultivar is smaller in size than many other Fittonias, producing leaves that are around a quarter of the size of one of a Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Big Leaf’  leaf.  The two plants are very similar in their appearance in all other respects; the obvious difference being the size of each Fittonia cultivar’s leaves. 

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘White Tiger’ (PBR) is an evergreen perennial.  This is a tender plant that’s suited to growing indoors as a terrarium, vivarium, or bottle garden plant.

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘White Tiger’ grows best when it’s planted in moist but well-drained soil or peat-free compost.  This is a tender plant that’s killed by frost and low temperatures; these plants need to grow in a warm (15C – 27C (59F to 80F)) room. 

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Joly Josan’ (PBR) is a small spreading, tender plant that thrives when it’s grown in a shaded location.  These plants flourish when grown in a moist, but well-drained, peat-free compost and thrive in a humid environment.  This Fittonia is an ideal bottle garden, terrarium, or vivarium plant.

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Joly Josan’ (PBR) is a naturally creeping and spreading plant, that grows up to about 15cm (6 inches) in height. 

Fittonia albivenis ‘Mosaic White’ is often known by the plant’s common name of the nerve plant – this name references the leaves of this tender plant’s white veining, which stands out against the lovely green of this plant’s leaf.  This is an attractive, easy to grow plant, which will help to brighten up any terrarium, vivarium, or bottle garden.

Fittonia albivenis ‘Mosaic White’ flourishes when it’s grown in moist, but well-drained soil, in a very humid location, away from harsh, direct light.  

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Red Angel’ (PBR) is also known by its common name of nerve plant, due to this Fittonia’s brightly coloured leaf veining.

Fittonias are excellent terrarium plants, but you could also try growing Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Red Angel’ as a houseplant in a warm and steamy bathroom.  Ensure you choose a location away from harsh, direct light or your plant will suffer.  

The common name of Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Forest Flame’ (PBR) is the nerve plant because of the decorative veining that highlights this plant’s leaves.

Like other Fittonias, Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Forest Flame’ (PBR) has specific growing conditions; this tender plant is killed by frost and cold temperatures and must be grown in a warm room.  In addition, Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘Forest Flame’ requires high humidity, moist, but well-drained compost, and low to medium light levels to grow well. 

The common name of Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘White Anne’ is the nerve plant due to the almost netted, coloured veining that decorates this little plant’s leaves.

Fittonia albivenis (Verschaffeltii Group) ‘White Anne’ is the perfect plant to include in your bottle garden, terrarium, or vivarium.  This is a great choice of plant if you’re looking to ‘lift’ the planting inside your terrarium. 

Fittonia albivenis ‘Skeleton’ is often referred to as the nerve plant, due to the distinctive nerve-like veining that this plant’s leaves display.

Fittonia albivenis ‘Skeleton’ requires low to medium light levels and high humidity to flourish.  These plants thrive when planted in a moist, but well-drained peat-free compost or growing medium.  The absolute minimum night time, winter temperature I would recommend for this plant would be 13C (55F), but warmer temperatures would be preferable; ideally temperatures should not drop below 15C (59F).

The common name of plants from the Fittonia albivenis Argyroneura Group is the nerve plant, this name refers to the Fittonia’s leaves with their distinctive veining.  Fittonias thrive when they’re grown in a terrarium, as these plants require low to medium light levels and high humidity to flourish.  When you’re looking to place your plants, avoid bright and sunny window sills, or locations where your plants will receive direct sunlight.

Cyanotis somaliensis ‘Kitten Ears’ is from Northern Somalia where it grows in the desert biome and dry shrub-land biomes.  These plants have a bushy, trailing habit and long, lance-shaped leaves that have a fine covering of long hairs that look very attractive, especially when viewed by certain angles in the sunlight.

This plant makes a superb houseplant for a light and bright room. 

I am such a fan of Tradescantia sillamontana, I adore this Tradescantia’s woolly foliage!  If I was designing a house for a houseplant flower fairy, the blankets on the fairies’ beds would be made from cosy Tradescantia sillamontana leaves and where these thick leaves have a lovely curve and depth to them – they would make the perfect cot for a flower fairy baby. 

Bring positivity to a dreary autumn day by forgetting the outside world and focussing on creating your own miniature plant world!  My step-by-step terrarium planting guide will help you plant your own long-lasting indoor centrepiece to enhance your home this autumn and winter.  Get ready to make the most of the longer evenings getting busy designing your own plant paradise!

Terrarium plants

A terrarium creates a perfect environment for small plants that thrive in low light levels and high humidity. 

I love terrariums and bottle gardens!  I so enjoy designing tiny plant worlds and creating miniature gardens.  This is the ideal time to build a terrarium or bottle garden, these Lilliputian microcosms are fun to make!  Terrariums will enhance your home and provide the perfect gardening therapy through the autumn and winter months.

The photograph above shows some of the ingredients that I use to formulate my own compost mixes for terrariums and bottle gardens. 

I planted this glass terrarium especially for the readers of October 2018 edition of Vantage Point Magazine.  This is a simple glass globe, planted with some attractive, but easy to find terrarium plants.  You can see all of the plants that I used for this terrarium, in the planting list below.  If you’re interested in any of these plants, click on an individual plant page for more information, where you’ll also find links to every article I have written for pumpkinbeth.com

I just adore creating terrariums, vivariums, and bottle gardens; I’d love to share my love of indoor gardening with you!  If you’re looking for some fabulous plants for a bottle garden, terrarium, or vivarium that you’re creating, I hope that my list of gorgeous plants that are perfectly suited to the growing conditions found inside these enclosures, will help you create a beautiful indoor garden.

A long-term review of the BiOrbAir (part three)

The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, which was designed by Barry Reynolds.  I planted up my BiOrbAir terrarium on the 25th September 2014.  As this was the first time I had planted a BiOrbAir terrarium; I chose a variety of different plants and ferns to trial and see how they each would grow inside the controlled environment of this terrarium, with the constant conditions the BiOrbAir provides.

A long-term review of the BiOrbAir (part two)

The BiOrbAir is a specialised terrarium, which was designed by Barry Reynolds.  I planted up my BiOrbAir terrarium on 25th September 2014.  As this was the first time I had planted a BiOrbAir terrarium; I chose a variety of different plants and ferns to see how they would grow inside the controlled environment of this terrarium.

A Long Term Review of the BiOrbAir

I am reviewing and trialling the BiOrbAir, a specialised terrarium from BiOrb.  I’ll be updating this page each month with a photograph of my BiOrbAir and an update of how the plants are growing and how well the BiOrbAir is working.  

This is the first part of my long-term BiOrbAir review, it starts after planting in September 2014, and continues through until April 2015.  

This is the full planting list for the BiOrbAir and the traditional terrarium I planted for my feature in the January 2015 edition of Vantage Point Magazine.