Aerangis arachnopus is an orchid species from tropical Africa.  In the wild, Aerangis arachnopus orchids grow as part of the ecosystem in evergreen forests in the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Zaire.  Aerangis arachnopus plants are usually found in a range from 400m to 1000m above sea level.

Like many orchids, Aerangis arachnopus plants grow as epiphytes.  Aerangis arachnopus orchids don’t grow in the soil, as terrestrial plants do; instead, epiphytic plants use their roots to attach themselves to the branches and trunks of trees. 

Angraecum viguieri is a small to medium sized orchid species that is endemic to Madagascar.  This orchid species is another epiphyte – a plant that grows upon another plant.  Angraecum viguieri is not a parasitic plant; this orchid species takes no sustenance or nutrients from its host.  However, Angraecum viguieri enjoys improved growing conditions and air circulation, due to being raised up by its host plant.

Aerangis articulata is a miniature orchid species from Madagascar and the Comoros Islands.  These handsome orchids produce very decorative, pendent snow-white flowers.

This orchid species grows as an epiphyte.  Epiphytic plants grow upon another plant; these orchids are not parasitic – they don’t take any nutrients or sustenance from the host plant they grow upon.  Growing as an epiphyte is a useful strategy for this orchid species; Aerangis articulata plants benefit from the improved growing conditions and better air circulation that their host plants provide them with.

Aerangis collum-cygni is a miniature to small sized orchid species that grows in humid forests, moist woodlands, and rainforests.  These plants also make themselves at home in areas that were once forests, in regions where the forest’s native trees were roughly removed to make way for the plantations that replaced them.  Aerangis collum-cygni can be found growing as epiphytes in: Cameroon, Gabon, Tanzania, Uganda, Zaire, Zambia, and other areas across tropical Africa.

Angraecum pseudofilicornu is a small sized orchid species that’s endemic to Madagascar.   This orchid can be found growing in verdant green, moss and lichen covered, montane forests, on: Anjozorobe, Analamazaotra, Montagne d’Ambre, Marivorahona, Mantadia, and Moramanga, in the Northern tip of Madagascar.

This orchid species grows as an epiphyte – a plant that grows upon another plant.  This is not a parasitic plant, Angraecum pseudofilicornu doesn’t take any sustenance or nutrients from its host. 

Angraecum cultriforme is an epiphytic orchid species from Tanzania, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.  These small sized orchids grow in evergreen forests and thickets, they’re often found growing near rivers.  Angraecum cultriforme plants grow as an epiphytes; these orchids tend to grow near the base of a tree, close to ground level, but plants also grow upon twigs and small branches.

Angraecum stella-africae is an epiphytic orchid species from the forests of Malawi, Limpopo, and Southern Africa.  This miniature orchid produces a short-lived white flower that’s absolutely massive in comparison with the diminutive size of the plant.  Each bloom carries an exceptionally long spur that starts life curled up while the plant’s in bud; the spur gradually unfurls as the flower develops, eventually straightening when the green-tipped spur points to the ground, reaching far below the bloom.

Arctium lappa can be found growing wild across Europe, Scandinavia, and the Mediterranean, as well as other locations around the world.  In the UK, Arctium lappa is more commonly known as Greater Burdock, but I’m sure that this plant has a range of common names, as it’s a native plant of so many countries.

This is an edible and medicinal plant that is grown or foraged for food and medicine. 

Origanum onites is one of my favourite plants; its a pretty little thing with a long flowering period; plants bloom over the summer months.  This is a superb plant for a wildlife garden.  Origanum onites plants produce an abundance of these sweet, dainty flowers that are adored by bees, butterflies, hoverflies, and moths.  Commonly known as marjoram, Origanum onites is a culinary and medicinal herb with aromatic leaves that will enhance a wide variety of culinary dishes.

Melons (also known by their botanical name Cucumis melo) are tender, sweet tasting fruits that can be successfully grown from seeds, in the UK.  Sow melon seeds in springtime – from March to the middle of May.  If you’re too late to sow seeds (or if you don’t have access to a glasshouse), you don’t have to miss out, as young melon plants can be purchased from many nurseries and garden centres.

Peas (also known as Pisum sativum) are annual vegetables from the Fabaceae or Leguminosae (Legume) family.  These climbing plants produce pods filled with peas.  The peas are often the focus for gardeners and cooks, but don’t miss out on the extent of the gourmet delights that peas offer us – as all parts of pea plants are edible – the shoots, leaves, pea pods, and the peas themselves – they’re delicious! 

Gerbera jamesonii ‘Red’ is a fun houseplant that produces large and quite dramatic, intense red coloured daisy flowers, which are really rather dazzling; they’re guaranteed to brighten up your day!

I find this type of Gerbera thrives when grown in a pot of slightly gritty, well-drained, peat-free compost.  When placing your pot of Gerbera jamesonii ‘Red, find a spot where your plant can bask in the sunlight – perhaps a sunny windowsill, a porch, or conservatory. 

Gerbera jamesonii ‘Yellow’ is a tender, perennial Gerbera.  This plant is great fun to grow indoors, as a houseplant.  Gerbera jamesonii ‘Yellow’ produces vivid, intense yellow coloured daisy flowers, which are large in size and really rather dazzling; they’re guaranteed to bring an abundance of cheer to any dull day!

I find this type of Gerbera thrives when grown in a pot of slightly gritty, well-drained, peat-free compost. 

Aerangis seegeri is a miniature orchid species from Eastern Madagascar and Nosy Boraha, a small island located near the East Coast of Madagascar (Nosy Boraha used to be known as île Sainte-Marie).  These orchids grow in the coastal forests of these plant rich areas, at a range of altitudes from as low as sea level, to as high as 1500m above sea level.

Angraecum drouhardii is a mini miniature sized orchid species from Madagascar.  This is an epiphytic orchid species that grows on the trunks of moss covered trees, in mountainous regions of Northern Madagascar, at 1200m above sea level.

I love this dear little orchid, it’s a very sweet plant.  Angraecum drouhardii plants produce snow white coloured flowers which are positively ginormous in size, when viewed in comparison to the size of this diminutive little orchid. 

Angraecum arachnites is a miniature, epiphytic orchid species, which is endemic to Madagascar, where plants can be found growing in humid, evergreen forests.

This orchid species produces really striking flowers, they’re quite large in size and are white in colour.  The blooms look rather like floral spiders, they have long and slightly twisting, curved extensions, which look rather like spider’s legs. 

Angraecum moandense is an orchid species that hails from the rainforests of a wide range of exotic, tropical locations, including: Cameroon, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, the Ivory Coast, Liberia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zaire.  Plants produce small, pale greenish yellow coloured flowers, which have reflexed petals and from a distance look rather leaf-like in their appearance.

This is a miniature orchid species whose natural home is growing in amongst trees and other plants, in damp humid rainforests, where competition for space is great and plants grow close to one another, growing cheek by jowl. 

Ilex is the latin name for the genus of plants we often refer to as hollies.  This is an interesting and diverse group of plants, that includes evergreen and deciduous plants, that form small shrubs, tall trees, and everything in between – depending on the Ilex species or cultivar grown.

Ilex are native plants of the United Kingdom, Europe, the Mediterranean, the Americas, China, North America, South East Asia, and other areas around the globe.

Lemurella culicifera is a miniature, epiphytic orchid species that can be found growing in the Comoros Islands and in the West and South Western regions of Madagascar.  Plants from this orchid species grow in thickets and in dry forests, in areas that range from just above sea level, all the way up to 1500m above sea level.

This is a floriferous orchid species; plants produce rather cute, small green coloured flowers, which are often borne in numbers.

Angraecum peyrotii  is a critically endangered orchid species that’s endemic to the Antananarivo Province, in central Madagascar.   Plants grow in a restricted area, in forests, from 1000m to 1500m above sea level.  This orchid species needs our help and protection to survive.  The plant’s habitat is threatened by logging; Angraecum peyrotii is at risk from people who are clearing forests in this area of Madagascar.