Ranunculus flammula is an aquatic plant with beautiful shining-yellow, bowl-shaped flowers.  This plant’s common name is Lesser Spearwort, but it’s very much like a lovely buttercup to grow in a pond!  Ranunculus flammula can be grown in streams, ponds, lakes, or continually wet bog gardens; if you don’t have a pond, you could grow Ranunculus flammula in a container filled with rainwater. 

Angraecum leonis is a stunning orchid species that can be found growing in the wild in Madagascar and the Comoros Islands.  As is typical of Angraecum species, Angraecum leonis flowers are white in colour and display a very glamorous air and appearance.  Angraecum leonis is a miniature to small sized orchid that can vary in size.  If you’re considering purchasing this orchid, ensure that a larger growing area can be provided if needed.

If you are partial to green flowers, you’ll love this orchid!  Angraecum calceolus is a small-sized orchid species from Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Reunion Islands, and the Seychelles.  This plant is larger than many of the orchid species I’ve listed in my various terrarium planting lists.  Angraecum calceolus is unlikely to be a compatible choice for glass bottle gardens; a more substantially sized terrarium, vivarium, or orchidarium would be required to comfortably accommodate this orchid and provide a suitable home that will present itself as lasting and sustainable accommodation, as the plant develops and matures.

I love to write about really easy to grow, great-tasting vegetables, so I’m truly excited to tell you about this type of Texsel Greens!  Texsel Greens ‘Garlic Kale’ (also known by its botanical name Brassica carinata) is an incredibly useful, edible plant that produces delicious tasting, garlic-flavoured leaves.  ‘Garlic Kale’ makes a lovely addition to salads, sandwiches, soups, and other dishes. 

Alliaria petiolata is a commonly found wildflower in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa.  Whenever its foliage is bruised, crushed, or trampled, this plant’s leaves release a scent that’s reminiscent of garlic; as a consequence, in the UK, Alliaria petiolata is often called Garlic Mustard, or Hedge Garlic.  Another common name for Alliaria petiolata is Jack-by-the hedge, which reflects one of this plant’s habitats and Alliaria petiolata’s prominence as a plant that lines our hedgerows. 

Digitalis purpurea f. albiflora is the botanical name for our naturally occurring, white-flowered form of Digitalis purpurea – the foxglove.  I adore both our pink-flowered foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea) and this stunning white-flowered form – they’re two of my favourite plants.  I’ve grown foxgloves in every garden I’ve created; I used to grow foxgloves at my allotment, too; I simply can’t be without these fabulous plants! 

Digitalis purpurea is the botanical name for one of our stunning wildflowers – the foxglove.  Foxgloves are charming plants that produce towering spires of handsome pink-purple flowers in June, July, and August.  We may chance upon Digitalis purpurea plants during country walks.  Groups of Digitalis purpurea flowers brighten our walks as we traipse through woodlands or heathlands, along coastal paths, over banks and hillsides, and alongside hedges and towpaths.

The Asparagus Pea (also known by the botanical name Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) is a small, decorative plant with a naturally low growing habit.  When I first heard of the Asparagus Pea, I was so excited by the very idea of this plant.  I can remember reading the description over and over: ‘a vegetable with a delicious taste that was somewhere between asparagus and pea’. 

Watermelons are great fun to grow!  If you’re wondering whether we can grow these delicious fruits in the UK, the answer is yes we can grow watermelons!  However, these plants will need to be started off in the protection and warmth of a glasshouse, polytunnel, or conservatory, and in the north of the country, (and in exposed positions) it may be preferable for watermelons to spend their entire lives indoors.

Swiss Chard (also known by the botanical name Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla var. flavescens) is a magnificent vegetable that brings a touch of its own exquisite beauty to the gardens and allotments where it’s grown.  This is another vegetable with an array of common names, it’s also called: Leaf Beet, Chard, Rhubarb Chard, and Rainbow Chard.  For ease of reference, I try my best to stick to calling this vegetable Swiss Chard; although I do also call it Chard from time to time – sorry about that.

Celeriac (also known by the botanical name Apium graveolens var. rapaceum) is not the easiest vegetable to grow; these plants have a long growing season and the seeds need to be started off in the warmth, fairly early in the season.  Celeriac seedlings will need to be protected inside a glasshouse, polytunnel, or conservatory, until all risk of frost has passed. 

Leeks (also known by their botanical name Allium porrum) are tasty vegetables that have short sowing window and a long growing season; as a result, many gardeners miss the leek’s narrow seed sowing period and accordingly fail to grow these delicious and versatile vegetables.  Like the majority of edible plants, leeks grow best in a sunny or partially shaded area. 

Rocket (also known by the botanical name Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa) is a fantastically easy-to-grow edible; it’s a productive plant with leaves that bring a deliciously peppery flavour to salads and culinary dishes.  I really enjoy rocket leaves eaten fresh in a salad.  One of my favourite simple suppers is a jacket potato with rocket and avocado.  However, you can also cook with rocket, as these leaves produce delicious soups.

Cornsalad ‘Medallion’ (Valerianella locusta) is a super easy to grow salad plant.  This is an annual plant that produces edible green, oval rounded leaves, with a subtle mild flavour.

I’ve grown cornsalad ‘Medallion’ in a really shaded position inside my Vegepod; my plants have thrived, despite the fact that they were grown in such challenging growing conditions.  My cornsalad ‘Medallion’ plants produced an amazing harvest of leaves throughout the autumn and winter months. 

Aerangis arachnopus is an orchid species from tropical Africa.  In the wild, Aerangis arachnopus orchids grow as part of the ecosystem in evergreen forests in the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Zaire.  Aerangis arachnopus plants are usually found in a range from 400m to 1000m above sea level.

Like many orchids, Aerangis arachnopus plants grow as epiphytes.  Aerangis arachnopus orchids don’t grow in the soil, as terrestrial plants do; instead, epiphytic plants use their roots to attach themselves to the branches and trunks of trees. 

Angraecum viguieri is a small to medium sized orchid species that is endemic to Madagascar.  This orchid species is another epiphyte – a plant that grows upon another plant.  Angraecum viguieri is not a parasitic plant; this orchid species takes no sustenance or nutrients from its host.  However, Angraecum viguieri enjoys improved growing conditions and air circulation, due to being raised up by its host plant.

Aerangis articulata is a miniature orchid species from Madagascar and the Comoros Islands.  These handsome orchids produce very decorative, pendent snow-white flowers.

This orchid species grows as an epiphyte.  Epiphytic plants grow upon another plant; these orchids are not parasitic – they don’t take any nutrients or sustenance from the host plant they grow upon.  Growing as an epiphyte is a useful strategy for this orchid species; Aerangis articulata plants benefit from the improved growing conditions and better air circulation that their host plants provide them with.

Aerangis collum-cygni is a miniature to small sized orchid species that grows in humid forests, moist woodlands, and rainforests.  These plants also make themselves at home in areas that were once forests, in regions where the forest’s native trees were roughly removed to make way for the plantations that replaced them.  Aerangis collum-cygni can be found growing as epiphytes in: Cameroon, Gabon, Tanzania, Uganda, Zaire, Zambia, and other areas across tropical Africa.

Angraecum pseudofilicornu is a small sized orchid species that’s endemic to Madagascar.   This orchid can be found growing in verdant green, moss and lichen covered, montane forests, on: Anjozorobe, Analamazaotra, Montagne d’Ambre, Marivorahona, Mantadia, and Moramanga, in the Northern tip of Madagascar.

This orchid species grows as an epiphyte – a plant that grows upon another plant.  This is not a parasitic plant, Angraecum pseudofilicornu doesn’t take any sustenance or nutrients from its host. 

Angraecum cultriforme is an epiphytic orchid species from Tanzania, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.  These small sized orchids grow in evergreen forests and thickets, they’re often found growing near rivers.  Angraecum cultriforme plants grow as an epiphytes; these orchids tend to grow near the base of a tree, close to ground level, but plants also grow upon twigs and small branches.