In the UK, Viscum album is normally referred to by its common name, Mistletoe.  Mistletoe grows up in the branches of trees where it forms spherical ball-shaped plants comprised of many stems holding pairs of lovely fresh-green coloured, leathery leaves.  This evergreen shrub produces tiny white flowers followed by shiny white berries.  The oval leaves are borne in pairs and are very attractive and are naturally enhanced by the edition of gleaming Mistletoe berries, which appear in September and take many months to ripen. 

Dipsacus fullonum is a biennial or perennial plant that’s found growing in the wild in a widespread area across Europe and even as far as regions approaching North West Africa.  In the UK, Dipsacus fullonum is usually known as the Teasel, but due to how far reaching this plant’s range is – I am certain that there must be countless different common names for Dipsacus fullonum.

Cyanotis somaliensis ‘Kitten Ears’ is from Northern Somalia where it grows in the desert biome and dry shrub-land biomes.  These plants have a bushy, trailing habit and long, lance-shaped leaves that have a fine covering of long hairs that look very attractive, especially when viewed by certain angles in the sunlight.

This plant makes a superb houseplant for a light and bright room. 

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana ‘Perfect White’ is a double-flowered form of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana with fully-double, snow-white coloured flowers.  The blooms are beautifully complimented by this plant’s gorgeous dark-green coloured, scallop-edged foliage.  Kalanchoe blossfeldiana ‘Perfect White’ is a houseplant that’s available to buy online or from garden centres, nurseries, or supermarkets.  In addition to this double-flowered, white form of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana that’s part of my houseplant collection, look out for Kalanchoe blossfeldiana forms with yellow, red, and pink flowers.

Sansevieria cylindrica ‘Straight’ is a rhizomatous plant from Tropical Africa that has specialised underground storage organs to store water and energy; these reserves enable this species to survive the dry seasons in Sansevieria cylindrica‘s homelands of Angola, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.  NB: The correct botanical name for this particular species is Dracaena angolensis, but plants are usually sold as Sansevieria cylindrica ‘Straight’. 

Cutting Celery is also known by the botanical name, Apium graveolens.  Cutting Celery is closely related to celery and celeriac, but these particular seeds have been selected and reselected especially for the flavour of their leaves.  The leaves taste like celery – it’s a strong flavour – so a little goes a long way, but it’s not too overpowering.  I really enjoy the taste of Cutting Celery leaves. 

‘Parcel’  or ‘Par-Cel’ is also known by the botanical name, Apium graveolens.  This is a hardy biennial plant that produces edible leaves with a strong flavour of celery; Parcel’s stems are edible too, but it is the pungent leaves that this plant is usually grown for.  The name of ‘Parcel’ was given because this edible plant has foliage that resembles parsley but when eaten it has the flavour of celery; so the plant’s common name is an amalgamation of the two names – ‘Parcel’.

The Florist’s Cyclamen (also know by their botanical name, Cyclamen persicum) are tender Cyclamen plants that are often given as gifts.  I find these particular Cyclamen are notoriously difficult to keep.  It’s a miracle if I can keep a Cyclamen persicum specimen alive for as long as a couple of weeks, as these plants thrive in cool temperatures of around 10-15C (50-59F) with a maximum temperature of 15C (59F) and they also require bright, indirect light. 

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana var. alba is tender perennial from Madagascar that’s often grown as a houseplant, in the UK.  I think this plant’s common name is Flaming Katy, but I am sure Kalanchoe blossfeldiana has many other common names.  I find that these plants are very drought tolerant and low maintenance, making them great gifts for both experienced and new gardeners.  Due to the fact that these plants are so easy to grow and they don’t need to be watered every week, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana is a perfect plant to give anyone that’s not overly interested in plants!

Juniper is also known by its botanical name, Juniperus communisJuniperus communis is an evergreen conifer with spiky needles.  Plants are very hardy and they flourish in exposed and sheltered locations.  These plants need a bright and sunny position; Juniperus communis is happy growing in almost any moist but well-drained soil, including stony ground and chalk.  When choosing where to plant Juniperus communis, avoid shaded areas and soils that are prone to water-logging. 

Yew is also known by its botanical name, Taxus baccata.  This is a glorious evergreen that’s versatile and accommodating.  Taxus baccata is happy to grow as a specimen tree or a hedge; plants are content to grow naturally as unpruned trees but are equally happy to be pruned and clipped into spheres, pyramids, corkscrew twists, hearts, or whichever shape your heart desires. 

The Silver Birch (Betula pendula) is one of our most recognisable UK native trees with its glorious silvery-white bark and dainty green leaves.  We’re not the only ones to have an affinity with Betula pendula, this stunning tree is a native plant of many countries in Europe and Northern Asia.  Betula pendula is a deciduous tree, its leaves turn from green to a buttery yellow before falling in autumn. 

In the UK, Prunus spinosa is usually known by its common name – Blackthorn.  I am sure that Prunus spinosa has many common names, as this is a widespread plant that can be found growing in the wild across Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa.  Prunus spinosa can be grown as a shrub, a hedge, or a tree.  These plants are very spiny and they often form thickets. 

Ilex aquifolium is the commonest holly we have in the UK; plants can be found growing both in the wild and as cultivated, garden plants.  This holly species can be used as container plants, for hedging, or grown as specimen trees.  Ilex aquifolium is native to the UK (Ilex aquifolium is absent from the Outer Hebrides, the Shetland Isles, and Orkney) but this is also a native plant of West Asia, North Africa, Southern and Western Europe.

Ranunculus flammula is an aquatic plant with beautiful shining-yellow, bowl-shaped flowers.  This plant’s common name is Lesser Spearwort, but it’s very much like a lovely buttercup to grow in a pond!  Ranunculus flammula can be grown in streams, ponds, lakes, or continually wet bog gardens; if you don’t have a pond, you could grow Ranunculus flammula in a container filled with rainwater. 

Angraecum leonis is a stunning orchid species that can be found growing in the wild in Madagascar and the Comoros Islands.  As is typical of Angraecum species, Angraecum leonis flowers are white in colour and display a very glamorous air and appearance.  Angraecum leonis is a miniature to small sized orchid that can vary in size.  If you’re considering purchasing this orchid, ensure that a larger growing area can be provided if needed.

If you are partial to green flowers, you’ll love this orchid!  Angraecum calceolus is a small-sized orchid species from Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Reunion Islands, and the Seychelles.  This plant is larger than many of the orchid species I’ve listed in my various terrarium planting lists.  Angraecum calceolus is unlikely to be a compatible choice for glass bottle gardens; a more substantially sized terrarium, vivarium, or orchidarium would be required to comfortably accommodate this orchid and provide a suitable home that will present itself as lasting and sustainable accommodation, as the plant develops and matures.

I love to write about really easy to grow, great-tasting vegetables, so I’m truly excited to tell you about this type of Texsel Greens!  Texsel Greens ‘Garlic Kale’ (also known by its botanical name Brassica carinata) is an incredibly useful, edible plant that produces delicious tasting, garlic-flavoured leaves.  ‘Garlic Kale’ makes a lovely addition to salads, sandwiches, soups, and other dishes. 

Alliaria petiolata is a commonly found wildflower in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa.  Whenever its foliage is bruised, crushed, or trampled, this plant’s leaves release a scent that’s reminiscent of garlic; as a consequence, in the UK, Alliaria petiolata is often called Garlic Mustard, or Hedge Garlic.  Another common name for Alliaria petiolata is Jack-by-the hedge, which reflects one of this plant’s habitats and Alliaria petiolata’s prominence as a plant that lines our hedgerows. 

Digitalis purpurea f. albiflora is the botanical name for our naturally occurring, white-flowered form of Digitalis purpurea – the foxglove.  I adore both our pink-flowered foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea) and this stunning white-flowered form – they’re two of my favourite plants.  I’ve grown foxgloves in every garden I’ve created; I used to grow foxgloves at my allotment, too; I simply can’t be without these fabulous plants!