If you’re looking to grow plants for bees and butterflies, you might be interested in this Allium.  ‘Gladiator’ attracts a wide range of bees and pollinating insects – I am certain that this plant will fulfil your requirements and may even surpass your expectations!

‘Gladiator’ Alliums produce tall stems that reach up to around 1.2m (4ft) tall.  Each stem holds one spherical inflorescence that’s formed from hundreds of small star-shaped amethyst flowers. 

Fritillaria imperialis ‘Aurora’ are statement plants with large vibrant orange coloured, pendulous flowers that really create impact in the garden.  Often referred to as Crown Imperials, these bulbous perennials form tall plants that reach up to around 1m (3.2ft) tall.

I’ve grown my Fritillaria imperialis ‘Aurora’ in large containers of peat-free compost.  I’ve found these Fritillaries to be strong and sturdy plants that haven’t required any staking or support. 

Primula vulgaris are low growing, perennials that form basal rosette shaped plants, made up of beautifully textured, wrinkled, obovate leaves.  These small plants are generally known as primroses.  Primula vulgaris are popular wild flowers; they’re often found growing in gardens, the countryside, and in urban areas across Europe.  Primroses are hardy; plants will happily survive temperatures down as low as -20C (-4F), and probably lower.

Narcissus ‘Art Design’ is a Double Daffodil Cultivar, from Division 4 of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Daffodil Classification System.  These full flowered daffodils produce blooms that open first as soft yellow and white flowers, which change colour as they age.  In ageing, these daffodil flowers become a white and a soft caramel colour, with a hint of peach.

If you’re looking to grow plants for bees and butterflies then this isn’t a daffodil for you, as Narcissus ‘Art Design’ blooms are double and they aren’t accessible to insects. 

Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ is a Split-Corona Daffodil Cultivar, from Division 11a of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Daffodil Classification System.

This daffodil’s flowers change colour.  Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ flowers open with white petals and a central split corona that’s caramel-orange in colour; the blooms age and the split corona pretty rapidly changes from orange to a peachy-pink colour.

Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ is a standard height daffodil with flowering stems of around 40cm (16inches) tall. 

Narcissus ‘Bright Jewel’ is a brightly coloured daffodil with yellow petals and a red-orange trumpet.  This is a really vibrantly coloured flower that stands out across the garden.

I love scented flowers, so I was happy to discover that Narcissus ‘Bright Jewel’ produces lightly scented flowers with a delicate, yet pleasing fragrance.  The scent has a definite hint of aniseed to its perfume – this aniseed character was something I was struck by, each time I encountered Narcissus ‘Bright Jewel’ in the garden.

‘Mild Cultivated’ rocket is a cultivated form of rocket that produces green leaves with a lovely fresh, yet mild flavour.  Rocket ‘Mild Cultivated’ foliage still has that lovely peppery rocket taste but the leaves don’t have any heat; these leaves are without the intensity of flavour possessed by other more commonly found rocket cultivars.  This is the ideal variety of rocket to grow for children or anyone who doesn’t enjoy hot, spicy flavours. 

Although watermelons can be grown very successfully outdoors in the UK (once all risk of frost has passed); I must tell you straight away that watermelon seeds need to be started off inside a glasshouse, polytunnel, or consevatory.  ‘Little Darling’ plants need to grow within the confines of a warm and protected environment until all risk of frost has passed (which is usually from late May to the middle of June, depending on where you garden – in the UK).

The Asparagus Pea (also known by the botanical name Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) is a small, decorative plant with a naturally low growing habit.  When I first heard of the Asparagus Pea, I was so excited by the very idea of this plant.  I can remember reading the description over and over: ‘a vegetable with a delicious taste that was somewhere between asparagus and pea’. 

Alpine strawberries or wild strawberries (also known by their botanical name Fragaria vesca) are small, low growing, plants that trail along the ground, spreading via runners; these pretty little plants can grow up to around 15cm (6 inches) tall.  I adore alpine strawberries!  These dainty little plants are utterly charming, with attractive leaves, delightful white flowers, and the delicious red strawberries they produce.

Spinach (also known by the botanical name Spinacia oleracea) is a tasty and fast growing, edible plant that is easily grown from seed.  This is a very versatile vegetable with an extended harvest period.  Spinach can be grown from seeds sown directly into large containers of good quality compost or seeds can be sown directly in the soil.  Spinach plants have a tendency to bolt; plants are most likely to go to seed if the weather is hot or if the plants’ soil or growing medium becomes too dry. 

Watermelons are great fun to grow!  If you’re wondering whether we can grow these delicious fruits in the UK, the answer is yes we can grow watermelons!  However, these plants will need to be started off in the protection and warmth of a glasshouse, polytunnel, or conservatory, and in the north of the country, (and in exposed positions) it may be preferable for watermelons to spend their entire lives indoors.

Grapevines (also known by their botanical name Vitis vinifera) are decorative climbing plants that produce delicious grapes and handsome leaves.  These wonderful plants can be very productive.  Grapevines are versatile plants; a range of varieties are available, you’ll find grapevines that are suited to growing outdoors in gardens and allotments, or types that favour the improved growing conditions found inside conservatories, porches, glasshouses, and polytunnels.

Huauzontle (also known by its botanical name Chenopodium berlandieri) is an easy to grow annual from Mexico.  Due to their similar appearances, this vegetable is easily identifiable as being a relation of the common weed, Fat Hen (which itself is another edible plant).  Huauzontle plants produce edible leaves and teeny tiny flowers, which are eaten as newly formed buds, in a similar way to Broccoli

Leeks (also known by their botanical name Allium porrum) are tasty vegetables that have short sowing window and a long growing season; as a result, many gardeners miss the leek’s narrow seed sowing period and accordingly fail to grow these delicious and versatile vegetables.  Like the majority of edible plants, leeks grow best in a sunny or partially shaded area. 

Physalis peruviana is a tender, herbaceous perennial plant that produces absolutely delicious tasting orange berries, which are quite exquisitely wrapped in these gorgeous papery lanterns.  Also known as Cape Gooseberries, Ground Cherries, or Inca Berries, Physalis peruviana is a lovely plant, with a slightly shrubby habit.

I find that Physalis peruviana plants don’t grow very tall.  Physalis peruviana plants eventual height depends on the seed the plant was grown from, as well as the plant’s age, and the overall growing conditions the plant has enjoyed. 

Rocket ‘Dragons Tongue®’ is a new type of rocket that produces these handsome leaves that are attractively veined with maroon; the red veining creates a rather nice contrast against the leafy-green of the outer part of the leaves.  Rocket ‘Dragons Tongue®’ leaves have a fairly strong, spicy and delicious, peppery flavour.  This is a superb rocket cultivar that is reliable, long-lived, and slow to bolt. 

Rocket (also known by the botanical name Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa) is a fantastically easy-to-grow edible; it’s a productive plant with leaves that bring a deliciously peppery flavour to salads and culinary dishes.  I really enjoy rocket leaves eaten fresh in a salad.  One of my favourite simple suppers is a jacket potato with rocket and avocado.  However, you can also cook with rocket, as these leaves produce delicious soups.

French beans (known by their botanical name, Phaseolus vulgaris) are such lovely vegetables to grow.  These plants are both productive and decorative, with attractive flowers.  French beans are super plants that will truly enhance your garden; the beans they produce taste delicious, too!

Firstly, take care to select the type of French bean you want to grow.  There are two types of French beans: tall climbing French beans (often called ‘Pole Beans’) that grow up to 8ft (2.5m) tall (and taller!)

I love growing blueberries!  Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum and Vaccinium angustifolium) are deciduous shrubs that produce sublime tasting berries.  These handsome plants produce tasty fruit but they bring added interest to the garden with their intriguing white, bell-shaped flowers, which are adored by bees in springtime and their vibrant autumn leaves.  In autumn, blueberries deliver stunning leaf colours, turning vivid shades of orange and red before falling.