Rhinanthus minor (often called Yellow Rattle) is a hardy annual wildflower with handsome yellow flowers that are held hostage by pumped up, yet slightly flattened, calyxes, each one flanked by a toothed green leaf.  Plants grow in meadows, grasslands, and prairies, flowering during the summer moths.  This is a widespread species that’s a native plant of many European countries.

If you’re looking for a glimpse of Rhinanthus minor, you’ll often find this wildflower growing in grassy places. 

Arctium lappa can be found growing wild across Europe, Scandinavia, and the Mediterranean, as well as other locations around the world.  In the UK, Arctium lappa is more commonly known as Greater Burdock, but I’m sure that this plant has a range of common names, as it’s a native plant of so many countries.

This is an edible and medicinal plant that is grown or foraged for food and medicine. 

Achillea millefolium is a herbaceous perennial that produces lovely ferny, scented foliage and large flat flower heads; each flower is made up of numerous individual florets.  This is a wildflower of the UK, as well as many countries in Europe and Asia.  Plants have spread further afield to colonise other countries and continents, after Achillea millefolium was used as an arable feed and escaped from gardens.

Origanum onites is one of my favourite plants; its a pretty little thing with a long flowering period; plants bloom over the summer months.  This is a superb plant for a wildlife garden.  Origanum onites plants produce an abundance of these sweet, dainty flowers that are adored by bees, butterflies, hoverflies, and moths.  Commonly known as marjoram, Origanum onites is a culinary and medicinal herb with aromatic leaves that will enhance a wide variety of culinary dishes.

Echium vulgare is a hardy biennial with hairy stems; plants produce pretty pink buds, which open as sky-blue coloured flowers.  This is a superb plant for a wildlife garden, as whilst it’s blooming, Echium vulgare is a veritable bee magnet!

This is a UK native plant that can also be found growing naturally in the wild in other European countries.  Echium vulgare thrives in areas that are out in the open and warmed by the sunshine. 

Peas (also known as Pisum sativum) are annual vegetables from the Fabaceae or Leguminosae (Legume) family.  These climbing plants produce pods filled with peas.  The peas are often the focus for gardeners and cooks, but don’t miss out on the extent of the gourmet delights that peas offer us – as all parts of pea plants are edible – the shoots, leaves, pea pods, and the peas themselves – they’re delicious! 

This is a beautiful plant – it’s one of my favourites!  Leucanthemum vulgare is commonly known as the ox eye daisy.  This hardy perennial plant is native to Europe and Asia, where it flourishes in meadows, banks, roadsides, and areas of waste ground.  Leucanthemum vulgare produces large, single daises with golden centres, which are surrounded by rays of white petals.  This is a super plant to grow to encourage wildlife, it’s beneficial to bees, butterflies, hoverflies, and a great many other insects, which in turn draw birds and a wider range of wildlife into the area.

You can’t miss Anthemis tinctoria when it’s in flower, as these glowing, sunny yellow daisies really stand out across the garden.  Anthemis tinctoria is commonly known as Dyer’s Chamomile, as the flowers and stems of this plant can be used to dye fabrics and other materials.  Plants flower in the summer time.  In the UK, Anthemis tinctoria usually blooms during June, July, and August.

I love Blechnum spicant, it’s such a handsome, charming little fern, with its narrow, dark green coloured pinnate fronds.  Depending on this fern’s particular stage of growth, Blechnum spicant may form low growing rosettes with the sterile fronds leaning out horizontally, or if the fertile fronds are more predominantly growing, plants will appear as more upright and erect in their habit. 

Lychnis flos-cuculi is an utterly charming plant.  This hardy, herbaceous perennial, is a UK wild flower, which is commonly known as ‘Ragged Robin’ – a name that references this plant’s star shaped, deeply cut flowers.  Ideally suited to growing in a wet, water meadow, a damp pasture, or a bog garden, Lychnis flos-cuculi is the perfect choice of plant to grow alongside a pond or in any soil or area of ground where the soil is always wet and prone to flooding.

Orlaya grandiflora is a gorgeous plant!  Looking like a rather glamorous cross between cow parsley and a lace cap Hydrangea, Orlaya grandiflora makes a great addition to the garden.

I love Orlaya grandiflora for so many reasons: it looks wonderful in the garden, befitting meadow or prairie plantings, cottage gardens; suiting modern or traditional styles.  It makes a beautiful cut flower and encourages hoverflies, bees, butterflies, and other pollinating insects, into the garden.

Valeriana officinalis is a herb, known for its relaxing properties, which is more commonly known as Valerian.  Looking rather like a pale pink flowered Verbena bonariensisValeriana officinalis produces branching stems that hold panicles of tiny star shaped flowers, in the palest shade of dusky pink.  This attractive plant is a magnet for bees and butterflies.

Growing to around Valeriana officinalis 1.5m (5ft) tall, Valerian produces scented flowers, leaves, stems, and roots.

Geranium phaeum is a hardy perennial plant that produces dark maroon coloured flowers, which provide valuable food for bees and butterflies.  Also known as the dusky cranesbill – this plant’s common name is quite apt, as this Geranium’s flowers really are a dusky colour.  Remove flowering stems as they fade, to encourage your plant into a longer flowering season.

Geranium phaeum grows to 80cm (2.6ft) tall, the leaves have dark markings which match rather nicely with its flowers. 

Anthriscus sylvestris is a biennial or short lived herbaceous perennial plant, which is more commonly known as cow parsley – in the UK, at least anyway – where Anthriscus sylvestris grows as a wildflower, along roadsides, hedgerows, in grasslands and meadows.

Flowering in late spring, in May, Anthriscus sylvestris is a popular plant with bees, hoverflies, and other pollinating insects

Easily grown from seed, sown in autumn or springtime, Anthriscus sylvestris flourishes in any well-drained soil. 

Drosera rotundifolia is a small, low growing, perennial carnivorous plant that forms a rosette shape as it grows.  Drosera rotundifolia is also known by its common name of round leaved sundew, this plant naturally grows in acidic peaty, boggy, marshy soils, across heathlands, lowlands, moors, and other areas, where you’ll find Drosera rotundifolia growing in acidic soil.  Drosera rotundifolia flowers from mid to late summer.