Angraecum cultriforme is an epiphytic orchid species from Tanzania, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.  These small sized orchids grow in evergreen forests and thickets, they’re often found growing near rivers.  Angraecum cultriforme plants grow as an epiphytes; these orchids tend to grow near the base of a tree, close to ground level, but plants also grow upon twigs and small branches.

Melons (also known by their botanical name Cucumis melo) are tender, sweet tasting fruits that can be successfully grown from seeds, in the UK.  Sow melon seeds in springtime – from March to the middle of May.  If you’re too late to sow seeds (or if you don’t have access to a glasshouse), you don’t have to miss out, as young melon plants can be purchased from many nurseries and garden centres.

Aubergines (also known as Eggplant or by the plant’s botanical name, Solanum melogena) are tender plants that need warmth and bright sunshine if they’re to thrive.  Sow aubergine seeds in pots of peat-free compost, inside a heated propagator or glasshouse, from January to April.  Ensure your seedlings are grown in an area that enjoys bright light.

From the end of May or beginning of June, (when there is no risk of cold temperatures or frost) if you garden in a warm area, aubergine plants can be hardened off (brought out from the glasshouse during the daytime and then taken back inside again at night for a couple of weeks), before being planted outside in a warm, bright and sunny area. 

Angraecum sacciferum is a miniature sized orchid species that can be found growing in the wild, over a widespread area.  This orchid species is a wild plant from many locations, including: Burundi, Cameroon, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sao Tome, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zaire, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.  Angraecum sacciferum grows as an epiphyte – when it’s found growing upon trees, and as an lithophyte – when plants are seen growing on or over rocky or stony surfaces, in wet areas, near rivers or streams.

As we learn more about plants, we make discoveries that result in plants moving from one plant genus to another; meaning name changes are required.  African violets used to be known as Saintpaulia, but their botanical name has now been changed to Streptocarpus.  I’ve left this group of plants listed under their old name, so you can more easily find them. 

Actiniopteris australis is a tender fern that requires warm temperatures to flourish.  This pretty little fern can be found growing in the wild, in a wide range of countries and locations, including: Madagascar, Australia, Africa, and Asia.

Producing very pretty, palm like fronds on a diminutive scale, Actiniopteris australis is a charming fern to add to your collection.

Actiniopteris australis is a miniature fern, that grows to just 15cm (6 inches) tall. 

Anthriscus sylvestris is a biennial or short lived herbaceous perennial plant, which is more commonly known as cow parsley – in the UK, at least anyway – where Anthriscus sylvestris grows as a wildflower, along roadsides, hedgerows, in grasslands and meadows.

Flowering in late spring, in May, Anthriscus sylvestris is a popular plant with bees, hoverflies, and other pollinating insects

Easily grown from seed, sown in autumn or springtime, Anthriscus sylvestris flourishes in any well-drained soil. 

Aerangis kirkii is a miniature to small sized, epiphytic orchid species, that originates from South Africa, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Mozambique.  Plants can be found growing upon both trees and shrubs in forested areas, close to rivers or near the coast line; this orchid species can be found inhabiting trees growing anywhere from sea level up to 200m above.

A warm growing orchid species, Aerangis kirkii requires filtered, diffused low light, or intermediate filtered, diffused light, combined with warm temperatures and a very humid environment to flourish.

Aerangis somalensis is a small sized, epiphytic orchid species, which can be found growing in various locations.  Plants grow in both dry areas of woodland, as well as near streams and rivers, in Africa.  The second part of this orchid species’ name – the specific epithet – derives from Somalia where this orchid is from, but this is not the only location where this orchid is found. 

Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta is a miniature epiphytic orchid species that originates from Kenya and Africa.  This beautiful and very distinctive miniature orchid produces attractive white, crystalline flowers, which have a bright orange-red column, or centre.

Aerangis luteo-alba var. rhodosticta plants enjoy growing in warm, humid conditions, where they can enjoy bright, filtered, indirect light.

For more detailed information about the care and preferred growing conditions of Aerangis luteo-alba var.