Here’s another superb rose that was bred by David Austin Roses.  Rosa ‘Wild Edric’ is an English Shrub Rose.  This is a beautiful rose to grow as a hedge – if I was planting a rose hedge, ‘Wild Edric’ would be the rose I’d choose.  Having said that, Rosa ‘Wild Edric’ also makes a fantastic plant to grow in garden beds and borders. 

Allium cristophii is a superb species of Allium that can be seen growing as a wildflower in Turkey, Turkmenistan, and Iran.  If you’re looking for plants to provide pollen and nectar for insects, you’ll be happy to hear that Allium cristophii flowers attract a wide range of bees and other pollinating insects, and this Allium species simply thrives in the UK!

Alliaria petiolata is a commonly found wildflower in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa.  Whenever its foliage is bruised, crushed, or trampled, this plant’s leaves release a scent that’s reminiscent of garlic; as a consequence, in the UK, Alliaria petiolata is often called Garlic Mustard, or Hedge Garlic.  Another common name for Alliaria petiolata is Jack-by-the hedge, which reflects one of this plant’s habitats and Alliaria petiolata’s prominence as a plant that lines our hedgerows. 

Digitalis ferruginea ‘Gigantea’ is an absolutely stunning foxglove!  Plants produce tall spires of fantastically beautiful, tan coloured flowers; each individual bloom is enhanced by a gorgeous rusty coloured veining.  The whole effect of a Digitalis ferruginea ‘Gigantea’ plant in bloom is truly breathtaking.  I remember the first time I saw these foxgloves in flower during a garden visit, I instantly knew that I simply had to grow these plants in my own garden and promptly ordered some seeds!

Digitalis purpurea f. albiflora is the botanical name for our naturally occurring, white-flowered form of Digitalis purpurea – the foxglove.  I adore both our pink-flowered foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea) and this stunning white-flowered form – they’re two of my favourite plants.  I’ve grown foxgloves in every garden I’ve created; I used to grow foxgloves at my allotment, too; I simply can’t be without these fabulous plants! 

Digitalis ‘Candy Mountain’ is a short-lived perennial foxglove, famed for its horizontal flowers.  Every single bloom is tilted upwards.  This floral adaptation allows us to admire each individual flower’s markings; it provides us with the perfect opportunity to observe bees buzzing in and out of each tubular bloom, as they pollinate Digitalis ‘Candy Mountain’ flowers.

Digitalis purpurea – our wildflower has downward facing blooms which tend to be held on one side of its main stem. 

If you’re looking to grow plants for bees and butterflies, you might be interested in this Allium.  ‘Gladiator’ attracts a wide range of bees and pollinating insects – I am certain that this plant will fulfil your requirements and may even surpass your expectations!

‘Gladiator’ Alliums produce tall stems that reach up to around 1.2m (4ft) tall.  Each stem holds one spherical inflorescence that’s formed from hundreds of small star-shaped amethyst flowers. 

Digitalis purpurea is the botanical name for one of our stunning wildflowers – the foxglove.  Foxgloves are charming plants that produce towering spires of handsome pink-purple flowers in June, July, and August.  We may chance upon Digitalis purpurea plants during country walks.  Groups of Digitalis purpurea flowers brighten our walks as we traipse through woodlands or heathlands, along coastal paths, over banks and hillsides, and alongside hedges and towpaths.

Allium ‘Globemaster’ is a stunning Allium with purple coloured, spherical flower heads, made up of many individual star-shaped flowers.  One of the taller Alliums, ‘Globemaster’ pops its head above lower growing plants.  These gorgeous globular flowers are held on tall sturdy stems that are usually resilient enough to withstand the worst of the wind and weather without needing any support.

This is a wonderful plant to grow in a wildlife garden; Globemaster’s tall purple flowers produce an abundance of pollen and nectar for bees, butterflies, and other pollinating insects. 

Primula vulgaris are low growing, perennials that form basal rosette shaped plants, made up of beautifully textured, wrinkled, obovate leaves.  These small plants are generally known as primroses.  Primula vulgaris are popular wild flowers; they’re often found growing in gardens, the countryside, and in urban areas across Europe.  Primroses are hardy; plants will happily survive temperatures down as low as -20C (-4F), and probably lower.

Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ is a Split-Corona Daffodil Cultivar, from Division 11a of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Daffodil Classification System.

This daffodil’s flowers change colour.  Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ flowers open with white petals and a central split corona that’s caramel-orange in colour; the blooms age and the split corona pretty rapidly changes from orange to a peachy-pink colour.

Narcissus ‘Pink Wonder’ is a standard height daffodil with flowering stems of around 40cm (16inches) tall. 

Narcissus ‘Bright Jewel’ is a brightly coloured daffodil with yellow petals and a red-orange trumpet.  This is a really vibrantly coloured flower that stands out across the garden.

I love scented flowers, so I was happy to discover that Narcissus ‘Bright Jewel’ produces lightly scented flowers with a delicate, yet pleasing fragrance.  The scent has a definite hint of aniseed to its perfume – this aniseed character was something I was struck by, each time I encountered Narcissus ‘Bright Jewel’ in the garden.

‘Mild Cultivated’ rocket is a cultivated form of rocket that produces green leaves with a lovely fresh, yet mild flavour.  Rocket ‘Mild Cultivated’ foliage still has that lovely peppery rocket taste but the leaves don’t have any heat; these leaves are without the intensity of flavour possessed by other more commonly found rocket cultivars.  This is the ideal variety of rocket to grow for children or anyone who doesn’t enjoy hot, spicy flavours. 

Although watermelons can be grown very successfully outdoors in the UK (once all risk of frost has passed); I must tell you straight away that watermelon seeds need to be started off inside a glasshouse, polytunnel, or consevatory.  ‘Little Darling’ plants need to grow within the confines of a warm and protected environment until all risk of frost has passed (which is usually from late May to the middle of June, depending on where you garden – in the UK).

Pea ‘Rosakrone’ (Pisum sativum ‘Rosakrone’) is super pea variety that produces these dainty, rose-pink and ivory coloured flowers.  Plants produce small to medium sized green pea pods that can be eaten young (as mangetout), or allowed to develop into deliciously sweet green peas.  This is a decorative and reliable vegetable that will succeed in a sunny and open site, in almost any moist, but well-drained soil.

Alpine strawberries or wild strawberries (also known by their botanical name Fragaria vesca) are small, low growing, plants that trail along the ground, spreading via runners; these pretty little plants can grow up to around 15cm (6 inches) tall.  I adore alpine strawberries!  These dainty little plants are utterly charming, with attractive leaves, delightful white flowers, and the delicious red strawberries they produce.

Watermelons are great fun to grow!  If you’re wondering whether we can grow these delicious fruits in the UK, the answer is yes we can grow watermelons!  However, these plants will need to be started off in the protection and warmth of a glasshouse, polytunnel, or conservatory, and in the north of the country, (and in exposed positions) it may be preferable for watermelons to spend their entire lives indoors.

Skirret (also known by the botanical name Sium sisarum) is a perennial root vegetable, which enjoyed great popularity in the medieval and Tudor periods, but sadly is rarely grown nowadays.  I expect Skirret’s fall from favour is due to this vegetable producing thinner roots than carrots and parsnips and therefore being far more fiddly and difficult to clean and prepare than these more popular root vegetables. 

Huauzontle (also known by its botanical name Chenopodium berlandieri) is an easy to grow annual from Mexico.  Due to their similar appearances, this vegetable is easily identifiable as being a relation of the common weed, Fat Hen (which itself is another edible plant).  Huauzontle plants produce edible leaves and teeny tiny flowers, which are eaten as newly formed buds, in a similar way to Broccoli

Physalis peruviana is a tender, herbaceous perennial plant that produces absolutely delicious tasting orange berries, which are quite exquisitely wrapped in these gorgeous papery lanterns.  Also known as Cape Gooseberries, Ground Cherries, or Inca Berries, Physalis peruviana is a lovely plant, with a slightly shrubby habit.

I find that Physalis peruviana plants don’t grow very tall.  Physalis peruviana plants eventual height depends on the seed the plant was grown from, as well as the plant’s age, and the overall growing conditions the plant has enjoyed.