Alliaria petiolata is a commonly found wildflower in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa.  Whenever its foliage is bruised, crushed, or trampled, this plant’s leaves release a scent that’s reminiscent of garlic; as a consequence, in the UK, Alliaria petiolata is often called Garlic Mustard, or Hedge Garlic.  Another common name for Alliaria petiolata is Jack-by-the hedge, which reflects one of this plant’s habitats and Alliaria petiolata’s prominence as a plant that lines our hedgerows. 

Celeriac (also known by the botanical name Apium graveolens var. rapaceum) is not the easiest vegetable to grow; these plants have a long growing season and the seeds need to be started off in the warmth, fairly early in the season.  Celeriac seedlings will need to be protected inside a glasshouse, polytunnel, or conservatory, until all risk of frost has passed. 

Skirret (also known by the botanical name Sium sisarum) is a perennial root vegetable, which enjoyed great popularity in the medieval and Tudor periods, but sadly is rarely grown nowadays.  I expect Skirret’s fall from favour is due to this vegetable producing thinner roots than carrots and parsnips and therefore being far more fiddly and difficult to clean and prepare than these more popular root vegetables. 

Grapevines (also known by their botanical name Vitis vinifera) are decorative climbing plants that produce delicious grapes and handsome leaves.  These wonderful plants can be very productive.  Grapevines are versatile plants; a range of varieties are available, you’ll find grapevines that are suited to growing outdoors in gardens and allotments, or types that favour the improved growing conditions found inside conservatories, porches, glasshouses, and polytunnels.

Blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum) are hardy deciduous shrubs that thrive in warm and sunny, sheltered sites.  These naturally bushy plants will grow in almost any well-drained soil.  Blackcurrants enjoy regular watering throughout the summer months; these fruits will tolerate a wetter soil through the growing season, providing the ground isn’t too wet during the winter months.  These productive fruits can be grown in full sunshine or partial shade.

Carrots, also known by their botanical name of Daucus carota, are an easy to grow, delicious root vegetable.  There are a wide range of carrot cultivars available for gardeners to grow, from the more regularly seen orange coloured carrots, to red, purple, white, or yellow coloured carrots.  I enjoy the subtle differences in the taste and texture of the carrots of each colour variation. 

Apples, also known by their botanical name of Malus domestica, are a group of deciduous fruit trees, which originate from Asia and have been cultivated for a great many years.

In the UK, apples are commonly divided into two groups: culinary or cooking apples and dessert apples.  Other countries do not group, or consider apples in this way, they treat apples as one group.

Figs, also known by their botanical name of Ficus carica, are wonderfully beautiful shrubs or trees, that produce delicious, parthenocarpic fruits in summer and early autumn.  In the UK, figs grown outdoors produce one crop of figs a year, but when the same fig plant is grown in warmer climates it can crop at least twice a year.

Fig shrubs or trees are very attractive, their large, beautiful leaves are very handsome indeed, these plants can add a pleasing character and charm to the garden.