Vanda nana is an epiphytic subshrub, a monopodial epiphyte that grows primarily in the wet tropical biome and can be found growing as a wild flower of Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos.  This is a miniature orchid; my Vanda nana plant that you see pictured above measures around 10-12cm tall.  Plants are also known by the synonym, Ascocentrum pusillum.

This miniature epiphytic orchid species can be grown mounted or planted in a small pot, but I prefer to grow my Vanda nana on a mount. 

Platycerium bifurcatum is also know as the Staghorn Fern; this is a stunning evergreen fern that naturally grows as an epiphyte – establishing itself on the trunks and branches of trees in its native environment in the treetops and rainforests of Java, Polynesia, Australia, and Asia.  This is a slow-growing, long-lived fern that will enhance your home when grown as a houseplant. 

I bought this young Asplenium from a garden centre.  The fern was in an area dedicated to terrarium plants with the pot simply labelled as ‘fern mix’.  I am uncertain what species or cultivar this fern is – I just know it’s an Asplenium.

As this fern grows and matures it is very likely to outgrow its terrarium, but that’s OK with me – I can enjoy this fern now and move it to a larger enclosure, or grow this fern as a houseplant at a later date. 

I must confess that I am a little doubtful that my Selaginella plants that you can see in my photograph above are actually true Selaginella apoda.  However, for more than three years I’ve seen exactly the same type of Selaginella on sale at various nurseries and chains of garden centres and all of the plants were labelled as Selaginella apoda – and so I may well be wrong and this maybe the correct name for this plant. 

Alocasia ‘Ninja’ plants thrive in a very humid environment making these plants ideally suited to growing inside a terrarium, vivarium, or bottle garden.  However, terrariums and bottle gardens are not universally the same, different enclosures will provide contrasting growing conditions.  When choosing a terrarium and deciding on a location to cultivate Alocasia ‘Ninja’, remember that these plants won’t be happy in a shaded environment – Alocasia ‘Ninja’ require bright but indirect light to be able to thrive. 

Pilea hitchcockii is a handsome little plant with attractive pointed leaves in intriguing shades of deep grey and chocolate-maroon, with tints of silver.  There’s a real depth to Pilea hitchcockii’s leaf colour; the combination of complimentary colour tones and such delicate and pretty serration along the leaf margins is exquisite.  I adore Pilea hitchcockii leaves!

This is a small, clump forming plant that thrives in bright but indirect light. 

Pilea cadierei ‘Ellen’s Silver’ is an attractive plant with silvery foliage.  The leaf colour on these plants is amazing; the foliage almost looks as if it has been painted with liquid silver!  This is such an eye-catching and stunning little plant with a naturally bushy habit.

Pilea cadierei ‘Ellen’s Silver’ thrives in areas that enjoy bright but indirect sunlight.  When deciding on where to place your plant, look for an area with soft lighting. 

This is Peperomia caperata ‘Red Luna’.  A peperomia with warm orange-red tinted leaves with raised veining and wrinkles that give the leaves another dimension and added interest.  There are a wide range of Peperomias plants available.  Peperomia caperata ‘Red Luna’ is an adaptable plant that can be grown inside a terrarium or bottle garden or cultivated in the traditional way, as a houseplant grown in a container.

Let me introduce you to Peperomia caperata ‘Schumi Red’.  This peperomia’s leaves are an attractive rich maroon colour with deep grooves and wrinkles that give the leaves added depth and texture.

There are so many types of Peperomia available.  Peperomia caperata ‘Schumi Red’ is an adaptable plant that can be grown inside a terrarium or bottle garden, but this Peperomia can also be grown in the traditional way, as a potted houseplant.

Asplenium bulbiferum is a very beautiful subtropical fern from New Zealand.  I adore the light and airy, carrot top like fronds that Asplenium bulbiferum produces; overall it has a very graceful appearance.

This fern grows as an epiphyte – the ferns grow upon other plants, instead of growing as a terrestrial plant that grows with its roots in the soil.  I mount my Asplenium bulbiferum ferns on their own individual pieces of cork bark and gently secure their roots in place with a strip of material cut from an old pair of stockings. 

There are various forms of Peperomia caperata plants available to purchase in garden centres and online.  Plants have handsome, fleshy leaves with deep set veins and their characteristic wrinkled foliage which adds welcome interest and texture to the home.  Leaf colours vary from silver, grey, glaucous blue and green tones, as well as green, red, orange, and variegated forms.

I’ve grown many forms of Peperomia caperata inside my terrariums and bottle gardens, where they usually adapt well and form much loved, long-term residents inside my enclosures. 

Peperomia caperata ‘Frost’ is an interesting plant with handsome silver and grey coloured foliage; as you can see from the photograph above, my plant has occasional soft blush coloured tints on it’s leaves and stems.  This plant has unusual colouring, making it a superb choice of plant to use as a contrast against other plants and to add a new style or colour to your home.

If you’re a fan of autumnal colours or you’re looking to introduce warmer colour tones to your home, why not invest in a Peperomia caperata ‘Quito’ plant?  Peperomia caperata ‘Quito’ leaves display an orangery-red glow and with their deeply grooved leaves they also add a really interesting texture to a terrarium or bottle garden.  With its unusual colouring and intriguing wrinkled leaves, these plants create a lovely contrast when they’re grown next to other terrarium plants and houseplants.

I bought this endearing little plant about ten years ago.  For me this is a truly charming terrarium plant.  I adore Goeppertia micans leaves; their foliage may appear to be lovely, but fairly ordinary plain green, narrow leaves, but when you touch this foliage it’s a delightful surprise to discover that these leaves are sumptuously soft!  The undersides of every leaf are smooth and silky, they feel like the softest velvet. 

I adore Asplenium fissum!  I’ve been growing these gorgeous ferns for about seven years now.  I really appreciate Asplenium fissum’s miniature size and endearing character and habit; I’m always finding myself admiring this fern’s decorative appearance and elegance.  Perfectly sized for terrariums, Asplenium fissum is a miniature fern that won’t grow taller than 20cm tall.  I must admit that most of my plants are smaller than this – many of my Asplenium fissum ferns have grown up to around 15cm tall.

Angraecum leonis is a stunning orchid species that can be found growing in the wild in Madagascar and the Comoros Islands.  As is typical of Angraecum species, Angraecum leonis flowers are white in colour and display a very glamorous air and appearance.  Angraecum leonis is a miniature to small sized orchid that can vary in size.  If you’re considering purchasing this orchid, ensure that a larger growing area can be provided if needed.

Lepanthes aculeata is a mini miniature orchid species that produces bright and cheerful, red, orange and yellow coloured blooms.  The flowers arise from the underside of a leaf; as the leaves are fairly upright they actually display Lepanthes aculeata’s flowers rather nicely.

I adore almost all Lepanthes species’ leaves, but I’m especially fond of Lepanthes aculeata’s foliage.  These tiny leathery leaves are two toned: the top side of Lepanthes aculeata’s leaf is a lovely leafy-green colour, while the underside of the leaves are coloured in a very handsome tone of mauve and this side has a rougher bristly-looking texture. 

Here’s another miniature orchid; this is Andinia schizopogon, an epiphytic orchid species that thrives in cool temperatures and humid growing conditions.  In this orchid species’ natural environment, these plants can be found growing in the cloud forests of Ecuador and Peru.

Andinia schizopogon produces rather curious looking mauve-maroon, finely striped flowers that look rather whiskery!  Plants can bloom at any time of year, given optimum growing conditions.

Lepanthes matamorosii is a mini miniature orchid species from Costa Rica.  This incredible little plant produces brick-red-orange coloured flowers which are astonishingly large in comparison to the size of the plant; they’re very cute!

In the wild, Lepanthes matamorosii can be found growing in regions at around 2750m, in The Cordillera de Talamanca mountain ranges of south-eastern Costa Rica.  This is a wonderfully diverse habitat that’s home to a range of plants and wildlife, including oak (Quercus costaricensis and Quercus copeyensis) trees that are endemic to this part of the world.

As the saying goes, ‘good things come in small packages’.  To prove this adage, here’s a teeny tiny orchid: Trisetella hoeijeri is an absolute darling of a plant.  An impossibly cute, exquisite beauty; I promise that this magnificent orchid will touch your heart, lift your spirits, and make you smile!

Trisetella hoeijeri is a mini miniature, epiphytic orchid species from Ecuador.