In the UK, Viscum album is normally referred to by its common name, Mistletoe.  Mistletoe grows up in the branches of trees where it forms spherical ball-shaped plants comprised of many stems holding pairs of lovely fresh-green coloured, leathery leaves.  This evergreen shrub produces tiny white flowers followed by shiny white berries.  The oval leaves are borne in pairs and are very attractive and are naturally enhanced by the edition of gleaming Mistletoe berries, which appear in September and take many months to ripen. 

The Silver Birch (Betula pendula) is one of our most recognisable UK native trees with its glorious silvery-white bark and dainty green leaves.  We’re not the only ones to have an affinity with Betula pendula, this stunning tree is a native plant of many countries in Europe and Northern Asia.  Betula pendula is a deciduous tree, its leaves turn from green to a buttery yellow before falling in autumn. 

Inula hookeri is a clump forming, herbaceous perennial from China.  I love daisies and I adore these sunny yellow flowers and I’m very fond of Inula hookeri’s super soft leaves.  Next time you see this plant, reach out and stroke a leaf, it’s soft and furry.  I appreciate this plant because its flowers attract bees and butterflies to my garden. 

Alliaria petiolata is a commonly found wildflower in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa.  Whenever its foliage is bruised, crushed, or trampled, this plant’s leaves release a scent that’s reminiscent of garlic; as a consequence, in the UK, Alliaria petiolata is often called Garlic Mustard, or Hedge Garlic.  Another common name for Alliaria petiolata is Jack-by-the hedge, which reflects one of this plant’s habitats and Alliaria petiolata’s prominence as a plant that lines our hedgerows. 

Phalaenopsis taenialis is a miniature, epiphytic orchid species, which originates from a number of locations, including Bhutan, Myanmar, and the Himalayas.  In teh wild, these miniature orchids can be found growing at the tops of trees, on the edges of forests.

Please note that I previously listed my Phalaenopsis taenialis plants as Phalaenopsis braceana (which is the name I purchased this plant as)