An Update from my Wildlife Pond in Early Autumn

Hello and welcome to my wildlife pond in September!  Since my last update, we’ve gone from one extreme to the other – from drought – to a stormy week of thunder, lightening, and heavy rain; followed by more rain over the last two weeks.  My pond (and water butts and water tanks) are all full to the brim! 

Wildlife Around my Pond

I am so grateful for my little pond; this small area of water attracts many insects to our garden.  As well as planting up my pond with aquatic plants that live in water, I’ve planted the narrow border around my pond with garden plants that will attract bees, butterflies, moths, hoverflies, and other insects.  If you’re interested in growing plants for bees and butterflies, you won’t need a pond or a boggy area of ground to grow these garden plants – they grow in regular garden soil – my plants are growing in free draining, sandy soil; so I’ve chosen mostly drought tolerant plants.

Making Meadows

Meadows present a natural, seemingly effortless beauty, with an undeniable allure.  For the most part, meadow guardians save much of the energy that gardeners spend repeatedly mowing and maintaining traditional lawns.  Nevertheless, meadows are not an easy option; creating a meadow requires endeavour, careful planning, and time, to ensure success.

Perennial meadow plants

Our native British, perennial meadow plants flourish in poor soils, where they grow contentedly alongside sedately-growing, fine-leaved grasses. 

It may surprise you to know that in the garden, as well as on the catwalk, fashions change and evolve, often quicker than we expect.  A plant that’s regarded as a ‘must have’ plant one minute, can soon be taken for granted and neglected, before being cast aside to make way for the latest modern plant introductions, when the superseded ‘must have’ plant is then at risk of being forgotten, often within a shorter time period than you might anticipate. 

The Morgan Stanley Garden was designed by Chris Beardshaw, and built by Chris Beardshaw Ltd, for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017.  I met Chris Beardshaw at The Morgan Stanley Garden, where I was interested to learn more about this show garden.

Firstly, here is some information about this Show Garden, but read on for a mini interview with Garden Designer, Chris Beardshaw himself!

The Telegraph Garden was designed by Andy Sturgeon and built by Crocus.  The RHS judges presented The Telegraph Garden with a Gold Medal, and the coveted award of Best in Show.

Remembering the sense of awe and wonderment that he felt visiting The National History Museum, for the first time as a child, Andy Sturgeon has used his childhood memories as the inspiration for his design for The Telegraph Garden.  

RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2016

The Royal Horticultural Society’s Hampton Court Palace Flower Show, supported by Viking Cruises, is the world’s largest annual flower show!  The Show covers 34 acres of ground, occupying both sides of the Long Water, in the grounds of Hampton Court Palace.

The Floral Marquee is 6,750 square metres in size – big enough to house an FA football pitch!