Acrobat ant update

Last year, I discovered Crematogaster scutellaris ants on the cork I purchased for my new Tall Orchidarium.  Crematogaster scutellaris ants are known as acrobat ants, but these ants are found in many different countries, so they’ve got many other common names, too.  With their distinctive amber coloured heads and pointed abdomens, these ants are easy to identify. 

Things to look our for when you’re setting up a new Terrarium

I’m currently in the process of setting up a new terrarium, which is very exciting!  Don’t worry, I’ll take you on a tour of my new Tall Orchidarium in due course.  However, today I wanted to tell you about something unexpected that happened to me, while I was gathering together the materials for this new enclosure.

Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium

Welcome to the twenty-third update from my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  Since my last instalment, the two plants that were really struggling – Diplocaulobium chrysotropis and Macroclinium chasei have both died.  But it’s not all bad news, I’ve got a few orchid flowers to share with you and I’m also celebrating that for this week at least, the tiny aphid species that has colonised the plants inside this terrarium is temporarily under control.

Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium

Welcome to the twenty-second part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  This trial update is not all about success.  Since my last update, two orchids have declined – one more so than the other.  One plant looks like it’s probably in the process of dying; while another miniature orchid just isn’t looking as healthy as I would like.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba

Let me introduce you to Phalaenopsis parishii alba, a miniature, epiphytic orchid species that originates from Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Assam, Burma, and the Himalayas.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba is the white flowered form of Phalaenopsis parishii.

Phalaenopsis parishii alba growing conditions

In the wild, Phalaenopsis parishii can be found growing in humid areas.  This miniature orchid species produces flattened roots that nestle into the damp, moss laden branches, which overhang streams and ponds, in the areas where this plant makes its home. 

Floriferous orchid species

If you’re looking to purchase an orchid, it’s always good to buy an orchid species, or a hybrid, that has a predisposition and willingness to flower.  So, with this in mind, today I want to share the joy of two floriferous orchid species with you!

Dryadella simula

I trialled this Dryadella simula specimen very successfully inside my Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium

Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium

Welcome to the twenty-first part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  Since my last update, I’ve re-arranged the planting, introduced some new plants, and replaced the moss inside this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium.  In this update, I’ve got some gorgeous Ceratostylis philippinensisPhalaenopsis ‘Purple Princess’, Lepanthopsis astrophora ‘Stalky’, and Restrepia seketii flowers to show you! 

Miniature Orchids in Flower today!

It’s so wonderful to be able to share these photographs that I have taken of my orchids’ latest flowers with you – these photographs are of the very same inflorescences that are open now – these are the orchid blooms that I am enjoying today – I hope that you’ll enjoy these miniature orchid flowers with me. 

Welcome to the twentieth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, which was designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  I first planted this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium in August 2015, so at the time of writing – in August 2018, this BiOrbAir terrarium is three years old! 

Welcome to the nineteenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  In this update, I share with you updates on how the miniature orchids are growing inside this terrarium – some plants are flourishing, while other plants have declined and so have now been moved to other terrariums.

Miniature Orchid Trial The BiOrbAir Terrarium

The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  

It may surprise you to know that in the garden, as well as on the catwalk, fashions change and evolve, often quicker than we expect.  A plant that’s regarded as a ‘must have’ plant one minute, can soon be taken for granted and neglected, before being cast aside to make way for the latest modern plant introductions, when the superseded ‘must have’ plant is then at risk of being forgotten, often within a shorter time period than you might anticipate. 

When I was a child, it was my aim that by the time I became an adult I would have saved up sufficient funds to purchase, and forever after protect a beautiful woodland or forest, and at least one meadow!  I haven’t succeeded in my aim – I sadly have been unable to protect any of our woodlands, forests, or meadows, but I still feel just as passionately about plant conservation. 

Welcome to the eighteenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  In this update I am thrilled to share with you the delightful flowers of Macroclinium manabinumCeratostylis philippinensis, and Masdevallia rechingeriana!  I’ll also be updating you on the growth and development of the newest additions to this Miniature Orchid Trial.

As well as these mini celebrations, in this update I will be sharing the sad news of the death of one of my miniature orchids, and I’ll also tell you about the pests that these orchids have encountered recently!

Since I published my December 2017 Orchidarium Update, a number of readers have had questions about how I gather my data, with many asking why do I collect data, and what equipment do I use?  So, here’s an article that I have written especially for you, which I hope will answer all of your questions.

Data is really exciting! 

It’s easy in life to make assumptions, but assumptions are rarely accurate. 

Welcome to the seventeenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  I first planted this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium in August 2015, so at the time of writing – in December 2017, this BiOrbAir terrarium is over two years old.

If you would like to start at the very beginning, and read the first part of this Miniature Orchid Trial and BiOrbAir review, please click here.

Welcome to the sixteenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  I first planted this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium in August 2015, so at the time of writing – in November 2017, this BiOrbAir terrarium is 27 months old.  Some, though not all, of the miniature orchids that are currently growing inside this terrarium were featured in the original planting of this terrarium, which took place in August 2015.

Welcome to the fifteenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir.  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  I first planted this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium in August 2015, so at the time of writing, in August 2017, this BiOrbAir terrarium is two years old!

Some, though not all, of the miniature orchids that are currently growing inside this terrarium were featured in the original planting of this terrarium, which took place in August 2015.

Welcome to the fourteenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir!  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  I first planted this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium in August 2015, so at the time of writing – in July 2017, this BiOrbAir terrarium is 23 months old.  Some, though not all, of the miniature orchids that are currently growing inside this terrarium were featured in the original planting of this terrarium, which took place in August 2015.

Welcome to the thirteenth part of my BiOrbAir Review – Growing Miniature Orchids in the BiOrbAir.  The BiOrbAir is a specialised, automated terrarium, designed by Barry Reynolds from BiOrb.  I first planted this Miniature Orchid Trial BiOrbAir Terrarium in August 2015, so at the time of writing – in May 2017, this BiOrbAir terrarium is 21 months old.  Some, though not all, of the miniature orchids that are currently growing inside this terrarium were featured in the original planting of this terrarium, which took place in August 2015.

I so enjoy growing miniature, epiphytic orchids.  When I am mounting epiphytic orchids, usually I use cork bark as a mount, although sometimes I will use other woods to mount my orchids, it all depends on which orchid I am growing, and what materials I have.

I hope this information will help you, if you’re mounting epiphytic orchids onto cork bark or other wood, or if you’d just like to learn more about these diverse and interesting plants.