I am sorry to say that 2018 was a terrible year for many of the daffodils grown in the UK.  The daffodils that were grown for my 2018 Scented Daffodil Trial experienced snow at the end of March, at a time when many of my trialled daffodil cultivars were grown, some of my daffodils stood poised and ready, just thinking about blossoming and coming into flower. 

A great many daffodil cultivars are listed as being scented, but daffodil flowers’ fragrances vary greatly, with some daffodil fragrances being more powerful than others, and some scents being more desirable and more pleasing.

Through my Daffodil Trials I have encountered a number of daffodils, which were listed as being fragrant, but when I grew the bulbs myself, I was disappointed to find that I was unable to detect any scent from their flowers however close I got to their blooms, and however many times I examined them. 

I am particularly fond of scented daffodils; last year I conducted a Scented Daffodil Trial, to showcase beautiful and enchanting daffodil cultivars, which produce exquisitely fragrant, long lasting flowers.

I’ve been looking forward to sharing the finest performing daffodil cultivars from my 2017 Scented Daffodil Trial with you, and as September is a great month to plant daffodil bulbs, this column offered me the perfect opportunity.

Fragrant daffodils deliver an uplifting joy and bring an unadulterated cheer into the spring garden; these scented daffodils can brighten your view and gladden your heart.  Many daffodil cultivars are listed as being scented, but some daffodil cultivars are more perfumed and more pleasing than others.

In 2016, I decided to run a Scented Daffodil Trial, to showcase the most beautifully scented, long flowering daffodils.  

For many, daffodils epitomise spring; historically they symbolised chivalry and new beginnings.  Today for many of us daffodils represent hope.

The quintessential daffodil is often pictured as bright yellow in colour, with a trumpet shaped flower, but in fact the daffodil has a long history of extensive breeding and consequently today there are a huge variety of daffodil flower colours – yellow, white, orange, pink and green, and many different flower types, and sizes of daffodil available.  

All daffodils are wonderful as cut flowers; it’s especially wonderful to enjoy the heady, deliciously sweet scent of the fragrant types indoors.  Some of the tall or large flowered, heavy headed daffodils, the double flowered types, do much better as a cut flower, they benefit from the protection of being admired in a vase indoors, as their stems are often damaged by the wind or rain outside.